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Moving" Picture 

WORLD 



Vol. 68, No. 1 



PRICE 25 CENTS 





Holland 




■IS 




J. Parker Read Jr. 



O 





RexDeachs 

drama of beautiful adventuresses 

featuring ' / 

Betty Bly the wMahlon 

Hamilton w£ * h a iar s e cast inci « d "i° 

Europe's Ten Most Beautiful Women/ 

'Directed by " (Di St r (Jilted Ay 

T.Hayes Hunter GoLdwynJoosmopolitan, 




Published by CHALMERS PUBLISHING COMPANY SSw'KScSft 

claa. «atter June 17, 1901, at the Po.t Office at New York. N. Y., under the act o4 March J. 1«79. Printed weekly. »3.00 a year. 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

^1 \r The King of 

■O : • .Daredevils 

+ C 0MING' 

The sensation of two continents 
— the man of iron nerve and 
muscle who has thrilled all 
Europe with his feats of strength 
and daring will soon appear in 
the most stupendous chapter 
play thriller yet offered to ex- 
hibitors. Thrills and surprise 
sensations unprecedented in 
chapter play production guar- 
antee its unlimited box office 
possibilities. 

WATCH FOR IT! 




UNIVERSAL'* 
COLOX/AL 

CHAPTER PLAY 

This, too, is included in 
Universale Great Spring Drive! 





May 3, 1924 

'73571 



ARGUE 

By DANNY 
All you please. About the 
summer picture situation. And 
vou get in a circle— and get no- 
'where Because the exhibitor 
places the blame of conditions on 
the producer. And the producer 
and distributor blame the exhib- 
itor. And there is no give and 
lake. So there you are. 

Cheap, unsatisfactory pic- 
tures, not good for showing 
any other time are released 
and shown during July and Au- 
gust. This seems to be the 
cleaning up period for all the 
unsatisfactory stock on the 
shelves. And what does this 
mean? 

Heretofore it has meant this— al-| 
ways: that your patrons get sick and 
dissatisfied; that they sec one poor 
picture after another and then stay 
away. Which means that you have to 
show a half dozen big successes early 
in the season to again get them in the 
habit of coming. H this isn t the 
height of asinine business ideas what 
is' You wouldn't find a duplication 

I of' such ideas in any other business 

j in the world. 

I // there isn't any money in 

running a theater during July 
and August why keep a thea- 
ter open? Certainly it would 
he far better to close during 
those two months, keeping 
I your busmess in good shape 

| by doing so, than remaining 

[ open, showing bad pictures, or 

I poor pictures, making dissat- 
I isfied patrons and otherwise 

I injuring your good will. 

I There are a lot of mighty good pn 

I tures that— for various reasons— are 

I not shown in various communities 

I during the early release period It 

I Mr. Exhibitor would work a littl< 

I hander— instead o^bejn^jntereste. — , 

I the b all game^/ and <ug some of those 

I ATp he would "be in a n excellent posi^ i 

I (tion to do business/ Sind keep his pa- 

I tVons happy— rather than show a lot 

I of junk, just because he buys it 

I cheap. The exhibitor who thinks he 

I is getting away with something by 

I showing cheap pictures is like the 

I man who wears a toupee. He only 

I fools one — himself. 



As for instance: 



Manslaughter 
Nice People 
On the High Seas 
Kick In 
Racing Hearts 
Prodigal Daughters 
The Ne'er-Do-Well 
The Heart Raider 
Law of the Lawless 
Homeward Bound 
To the Last Man 
The Cheat 
Zaza 

The Spanish Dancer 
Wild Bill Hickok 
Call of the Canyon 
Don't Call It Love 
Flaming Barriers 
Pied Piper Malone 
Shadows of Paris 
Icebound 
Peter the Great 
The Confidence Man 
Triumph 
Bluff 

The Old Homestead 



To Have and to Hold 
Back Home and Broke 
My American Wife 
Grumpy 

Trail of the Lonesome 

Pine 
The Exciters 
Only 38 

Woman with Four Faces 

Hollywood 

Bluebeard's 8th Wife 

Ruggles of Red Gap 

Woman-Proof 

His Children's Children 

To the Ladies 

Big Brother 

West of the Water Tower 
The Humming Bird 
Heritage of the Desert 
The Stranger 
A Society Scandal 
The Fighting Coward 
Dawn of a Tomorrow 
The Breaking Point 
Men 



Your Paramount exchange has fresh, perfect prints and com- 
plete advertising campaigns on every one of these BIG pictures. 



Daily. 



Summer or Winter- 



paramount (pictures 



PRODUCED BY 



■:s^k\ famous players-lasky corporation E^Ktmk 

l«gt-V " ^» 'NEW VOR.K. CIIV (* flBMJ„tWJ » 

y,fflyA<« j AD 9w p . H ,,, z -.V KO * Jt ^,hh5SJf- y C E £ l , L ,ft,% MII ; LE 



4 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Play BIG Spring Pictures! 




Light, fast, scream- 
ingly funny — an 
ideal new Spring 
comedy from the 
director of "The 
Covered W a g o n." 
Adapted by Walter 
Woods from Booth 
Tarkington's b i g 
stage play, "Mag- 
nolia." Ask the man 
who's played it! 



Adolph Zukor and Jesse LLasky 
present A 

Jan^CRUZE 

PRODUCTION 



WITH 



"The Ftehtin 




ERNEST TORRENCE 
MARY ASTOR. 
NOAH BEERY 
PHYLLIS HAVER 
CULLEN LANDIS 
paramount Qiclure^ 




Other BIG May -June Releases: 

ICEBOUND MONTMARTRE 

BLUFF TIGER LOVE 

CODE OF THE SEA THE GUILTY ONE 

DAWN OF A TOMORROW THE BEDROOM WINDOW 



(paramount Q>idures 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



5 



Breaking Point for Records! 




A BIG mystery melodrama written by the most successful writer 
of mystery stories in the world — Mary Roberts Rinehart, author 
of "The Bat" and others. All-star cast. Elaborate box-office 
production by the director of "Shadows of Paris" and "The Spanish 
Dancer." Adapted by Edfrid Bingham and Julie Herne. It's the stuff 
that gets the money, boys! 

Produced by 



FAMOUS PLAYERS- LAS KY CORPORATION 

' ADOLPH ZUKOR. P..i/d»«e • . 




MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 




STARRING 

MADGE BELLAMY 
JOHN BOWERS 
OTIS HARLAN 
HAL COOLEY 

FRANCELLIA 

BILLINGTON 
BILLY B. VAN 

and others. 

Directed by Win. A. Seiter 



"AMUSEMENTS" said 

Entertainment value— VERY GOOD— Exploitation— VERY GOOD — Palmer photoplay 
has rung the bell again in its 2nd offering. — It, apparently, is one organization which 
recognizes the factors which make for box office successes, which presages a real boom 
for exhibitors.— This fact was illustrated in "JUDGMENT OF THE STORM." It is 
emphasized in "THE WHITE SIN." It is a worthy successor to "JUDGMENT OF 
THE STORM." 

There's the whole story to ycu on "THE WHITE SIN." With such a cast 
as Madge Bellamy, John Bowers, Hal Cooley, Francellia Billington, Billy 
d. Van, Otis Harlan, Ethel Wales and others, plus a Box Office title which 
has m^de a hit with more than 1,800 exhibitors, you can book and boost "THE 
WHITE SIN" to the limit. 

FILM BOOKING OFFICES 



OF AMERICA, Inc. 



723 Seventh Avenue, New York City 



Sales Office United Kingdom: R-C Picture Corf.. 26-27 D' Arblay St., U'ardour St., 
London, W . 1, England 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 




jts for women! 

Why Get Married 

Andree Lafayette 




Can the woman who handles business 
contracts keep the laundry list straight 
too? 

Is the hand that rocks the cradle able 
to manipulate the typewriter also? 

Are the meals as good, the kiddies as 
well scrubbed, the house as spick and span 
while mother is winning promotion down- 
town? 



A Laval Photoplays Production. 

A LAVAL PHOTOPLAYS PRODUCTION 



Here's contrast to arouse discussion — ■ 
the contrast of the bride who is a business 
woman with the bride who's a housewife 
and mother. 

It's a situation you can exploit — an ab- 
sorbing story of two first years of marriage 
■ — a story that will interest women every- 
where. 

And it's women, remember, who keep 
your theatre going. 



ASSOCIATED EXHIBITORS 



>ical distributor 

fH6' EXCHANGE 



ARTHUR-S. KANE pkestdea't 



FOREIGN REPRESENTATI 
SIDNEY GAAftCTT 



18 



MOV 1 X G PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



You are in the midst of Universale Great 
Spring Drive ! Every showman in the 
business should book Universal pro- 
duct as a matter of self-interest. No 
showman — not a single exhibitor — can 
afford to miss the chance to cash in 
on this great drive offer. Your keen 
sense of showmanship will prompt you 
to act at once. Here is everything in 
audience-tested pictures at a price not 
one cent higher than you can afford to 
pay ! 

UNIVERSAL JEWELS 

THE STORM 

with Virginia Valli and House Peter-;. 
HUMAN HEARTS 

with House Peters and a big cast. 
THE SHOCK 

with Lon Chaney and Virginia Valli. 
UNDER TWO FLAGS 

starring Priscilla Dean. 
KENTUCKY DERBY 

starring Reginald Denny. 
TRIFLING WITH HONOR 

with an all-star cast. 
HUNTING BIG GAME IN AFRICA 
THE FLIRT 

with an all-star cast. 
THE FLAME OF LIFE 

starring Priscilla Dean. 
DRIVEN 

with an all-star cast. 
THE ABYSMAL BRUTE 

starring Reginald Denny. 
BAVU 

with an all-star cast. 
MERRY GO ROUND 

with Mary Philbin, Norman Kerry. 

George Hackathorne. 
A CHAPTER IN HER LIFE 

A Lois Weber production with a 

great cast. 
DRIFTING 

starring Priscilla Dean. 
TRIFLING WITH HONOR 

with J. Warren Kerrigan, Anna Q. 

Nilsson and Tom Santschi. 
THE ACQUITTAL 

with Claire Windsor. Norman Kerry. 

Barbara Bedford and Richard Tra- 

vers. 

A LADY OF QUALITY 

starring Virginia Valli with Milton 
Sills. 

THE DARLING OF NEW YORK 

with Baby Peggy and an all-star cast. 
WHITE TIGER 

starring Priscilla Dean. 

THE LAW FORBIDS 

Baby Peggy with Robert Ellis, Eli- 
nor Faire and a big cast. 

FOOLS HIGHWAY 

starring Mary Philbin. 

SPORTING YOUTH 

starring Reginald Denny. 

THE STORM DAUGHTER 

starring Priscilla Dean. 

THE LEATHER PUSHERS 

Smashing romances of the prize riiii; 
from H. C. Witwer Collier's Weekly 
stories. 

First, second and third series featur- 
ing Reginald Denny. Fourth series 
featuring Billy Sullivan, Universal 
Jewel Series. 

FAST STEPPERS 

starring Billy Sullivan. Stories by 
Gerald Beaumont, master of spor 
stories appearing in the Red Bo k 
Magazine. Universal Jewel Series. 




A Special Word to 

No. 380 Straight from the Shoulder Talks 
by Carl Laemmle, President of the 
Universal Pictures Corporation 

[HIS talk is intended for those of you 
who are ruinously hammering down 
Universal rental prices through book- 
ing circuits, booking agencies or whatever you 
choose to call them. 

You tell me you formed these booking 
combinations to defend yourselves against pro- 
ducers or distributors who are crushing you. 
You tell me your booking combination is the 
only weapon with which you can combat still 
greater circuits, whether owned by producers 
or not. 

I don't know anything about that, because 
undoubtedly there are two sides to that story 
as to every other story. But I do know that, 
thoughtlessly and without intending to do so, 
you are hammering prices down on the very 

company you ought to support to the last 
ditch. Every time you use that booking com- 
bination against Universal, you are using it 
against yourself ! Everything you do to 

weaken Universal is a good swift kick in 
your own pants ! 

I ask you to stop it and stop it now! 

With all the power at my command, I ask 
you to realize that if you treat Universal as an 
enemy — as some of you are unintentionally 
doing — you are fighting your own future, 
battling vour own flesh and blood! 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



19 



Rooking Circuits 

Do I ask special favors for Universal. 7 
YOU BET YOUR LIFE I DO! 

I ask you to treat Universal as you would 
treat a partner. Regardless of what your 
booking combination rules may be, I ask you 

to waive them in dealing with Universal I ask 

you to quit forcing me to deal with one theatre. 
I ask you to quit restraining me from getting 
the benefit of competition among you! I ask 
you to quit fixing the price that I've got to 
accept for my pictures! I ask you to quit club- 
bing my prices down to a ridiculous basis! 

By what earthly right do I ask these 
things? Simply by right of the fact that I've 
never done anything to warrant this sort of 
rough treatment from exhibitors. I am not 
threatening you with great chains of thea- 
tres. I never tried to force you to book "every- 
thing or nothing." I never tried any cute or 
devilish little tricks or schemes or devices to 
take you into camp. I've always played with 
you with every darned card on the table, face 
up, and not a card up my sleeve. 

If you are determined to use a club in 
booking, don't use it where it will damage you 
in the end. There is no greater blow you 

could give yourself than to injure Universal. 

I know you are hurting us without realizing 
what you are doing. Now that you do know, 
will you wake up and quit fighting yourself 
over my shoulder ? 



? 



Universal Star Series 

Here is a group of high-powered 
box-office stars supported by splen- 
did casts, expert direction and all the 
resources of Universal City in a 
great variety of appealing stories. 
JACK HOXIE 

In seven rough-riding outdoor ac- 
tion pictures. 

HERBERT RAWLINSON 

Nine tested and proved pictures of 
the gentleman-adventurer variety. 
GLADYS WALTON 

In five noteworthy pictures of the 
modern girl. 
LAURA LA PLANT 

In two productions full of peppy, 
actionful comedy. A magnetic new 
screen personality. 
ALL STAR CASTS 

Here are a dozen productions with 
sure-fire box-office profits guaranteed 
on past performances. All produced 
with special casts and exploitation 
angles. 



HOOT GIBSON 

The whimsical western star in eight 
galloping releases, each an audience pic- 
ture with a box-office wallop I 

UNIVERSAL 
SHORT SUBJECTS 

CHAPTER PLAYS 

"The Steel Trail," "The Fast Express," 
"The Ghost City," "Beasts of Paradise," 
Featuring William Duncan, Pete Morri- 
son, Margaret Morris, William Desmond 
and Eileen Sedgwick. 

CENTURY COMEDIES 
starring Hilliard Karr, Jack Earle, Al 
Alt, Pal, the Dog; The Century Follies 
Girls, Buddy Messinger and Spec O'Don- 
nell. 

UNIVERSAL ONE-REEL COMEDIES 

Featuring Neely Edwards and Bert 
Roach. 

THE GUMPS 

Featuring Joe Murphy and Fay Tincher. 

TWO-REEL WESTERNS 
featuring: Pete Morrison, Harry Carey, 
Bob Reeves, Roy Stewart, Helen Gibson. 
Kingfisher Jones, Jack Dougherty and 
Helen Holmes. 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS 
The best pictorial news service brought 
to the screen. Advertised daily in all 
Hearst papers to over 20,000,000 readers. 

THE MIRROR 
A novelty sensation reflecting the past 
and current events. 




Universal s 

Great 
SpringDrive 

4 is on/ 




Get the bid 
surprise otter 

IUNIVERSAL EXCHANGE 



May 3, 1924 



20 MOVING PICTURE WORLD May 3, 1924 

A Screen Show- Down 



%eady 
For 

Immediate 
please 





B. F. ZEIDMAN presents 

"Daring Youth" 

The Story of an Untamed Wife 
and cf Knowing Husband 



BEBE DANIELS 

Supported by 

NORMAN KERRY LEE MORAN 

LILLIAN LANGDON >od ARTHUR HO YT 

'Directed by WILLIAM BEAUD1NE 



Sacramento Pictures corporation 

presents 

John C ort ' s Famous Stage Success 

LISTEN LESTER" 

LOUISE FAZENDA - EVA NOVAK 
HARRY MVERS - GEORGE O'HARA 
ALEC FRANCIS - LEE MORAN 
and DOT FARLEY 

Directed by Wm. A. SEITER 



Distributed 
through - — ' 



Big' Ones- they 

PRINCIPAL PICTURES 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



21 



With a Pat* Hand . 



Eastern productions. Inc. 

present 

"The Masked Dancer" 



HELENE CHADWICK 

and 

LOWELL SHERMAN 
eAdapled from 
"The Woman With the Mask" by Kpdolph Lothar 
Directed by BURTON KING 



B. F. ZEIDMAN presents 

"The Good Bad Boy" 



JOE BUTTER WORTH, MARY JANE IRVING 
and 

BROWNIE, The Great Dog 
Directed by EDDIE CL1NE 

Director of "Circus Day>" 



'Book Them 

Through the 
Leading 
Exchange in 
Your Territory 




B. F.. ZEIDMAN presents 

"DAUGHTERS 
OF PLEASURE" 

Starring 

MARIE PREVOST and MONTE BLUE 

Directed by William Beaudine 



can 't be beaten ! 
CORPORATION 



Principals second 
series of 




BETWEEN 




A Great 
Love Story 

By 

ROBERT W. CHAMBERS 

What is Greater — 

Man's Friendship for 

Man — Or — 

Man's Love for Woman? 

Shall a Friend Forgive 
Him Who Destroys 
His Home? 

oA Drama of 
Scourged Hearts 




FRIENDS 



Played By 
A Star Cast 



LOU TELLEGEN 
ANNA Q. NILSSON 
NORMAN KERRY 



(Courtesy of Universal ) 



ALICE CALHOUN 
STUART HOLMES 

4 

HENRY BARROWS 






NOW BEING SOLO ON INDEPENDENT MARKET 

GOTHAM PRODUCTIONS 

1600 BROADWAY NEW YORK CITY 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



BORROWED HUSBANDS 



A Great Story Of Society 

In Which— 



NANCY REALLY LOVED 
HER HUSBAND BUT 
WHEN HE WENT 
AWAY— 





SHE LET MAJOR 
DESMOND THINK SHE 
{ WAS FREEAND HE FELL 
I N LOVE WITH HER-- ■ 



/ DR1ANGWELL THE HUSBAND 
OF HER BEST FRIEND MADE 
DESPERATE LOVE 
TO HER—- 




AND 

"CURTIS STANLEY 
iROKE HIS WIFE'S HEART 
BY FLIRTING WITH HER 



Florence Vidor, Earle Williams 
rockcliffe fellowes, robert gordon 

A DAVID SMITH PRODUCTION 



ALBERT E. SMITH president 



mmmmmwsm 



26 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3. 1924 




KENOAU-' 



CAPITOL THEA 

DIRECTOBS chaMBWS 
ROB 2?Lu du poWT 



sss-Ssssass' 



April 



4th, 



1924. 



^ax to. Min^: 



.„t to congratulate yo^ 
I "that V ar \f S lendoza, 

C0 /tufa3S0clat93. ^ out 
0 f our » + 0 me ^o -lieu- 

^ the theatres, in lieu 

Lese f Q f a t9 an f muBicianB in the 

«fS Pl0t " ^ahle hecause It 

^ei<rr a y ver/ « ^ ^ ^ 

X thin* it la 
execute!- 



'/hematic Music 



Cue „SAee^ 



VIRTUOUS LIARS 




The Times — "The settings in this film were favor- 
able as were the lighting and photography in most 
of the sequences." 




The Evening World — "It has Dagmar Godowsky 
as one of its features. She does excellent work as do 
Burr Mcintosh and Naomi Childers." 




The Morning World— He (Maurice Costello) 
seems to have retained much of the charm and 
personality which made him such a popular idol. 




The Brooklyn Eagle— "There are two per- 
formances that are really better than average 
screen characterizations. They are those of 
Edith Allen and David Powell. Miss Allen is 
a comparative newcomer to the shadowed drama 
but she leaves no room for doubts about her fu- 
ture on the screen, as for Powell he can always 
be depended upon for a thoroughly satisfactory 
interpretation." 



A Whitman Bennett Production 



Released by Vitagraph 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



29 



MSRMAID COMMVISS 

Every one a new story, with new laughs and something DIFFERENT 
in comedy entertainment. But every one full of fast, snappy action. 

EVERY 

Jack White Production 



IS A SURE LAUGH-GETTER 



FAMILY LIFE" 



With MARK JONES 
and SUNSHINE HART 

"'Family Life' will prove the hit of 
any program, and the hard-boiled ex- 
hibitor or patron who doesn't get a lot 
of laughs out of it needs a pulmotor— 
he is almost dead. * * * One of the best 
Comedies Jack White ever made." 

Exhibitors Herald 

"You can usually count on a brands 
new comedy stunt in a Jack White 
production, and 'Family Life' is no 
exception." Moving Picture World 




THE SPICE OF THE PROGP.A 




THERE 
HE GOES" 



With 



LIGE CONLEY 

Remember what a scream Lige Conley was 
as the automobile racer in " Backfire"? You will 
agree he is even funnier in the horse race in 
"There He Goes". 



Xised by JACK WHITE 



For foreign rights address 
FAR EAST FILM CORPORATION 
729 Seventh Avenue 
New York City 



EDUCATIONAL 
FILM EXCHANGES, Inc. 



m 



30 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 




By 



ted 



p t acv ^ - 



OW FIRST 

tf NATIONAL J 
^APiaURESJ 



"Please, Oh ! Please— Don 't 
ask me to do that. " 



flfiosfi.Jmx 

presents 

Cheat 



She hated his life, his friends. 
He was her husband and de- 
lighted in forcing her to do 
those things which caused her 
great pain. 

Then came the storm; the 
wrecking of the yacht and 
freedom. 

This is, indeed, what is termed 
"a peach of an audience picture." 



A Jitfit national Attraction 




Moving Picture 

WORLD 

Founded j'n ltyOJ by J. P. Chalmers 




The Editor's Views 

Saunders Speaks Up for the Salesman — and We Agree — The Man in the Trenches 

and His Chance to Rise to Headquarters 



EDWARD M. SAUNDERS, sales manager 
for Metro Pictures, takes good natured ex- 
ception to the otherwise unanimous praise 
accorded our salesman friend, "Bozo" Jones. Mr. 
Saunders tells us: 

"The only thing I have against material of this 
sort is that it tends to cheapen or throw in a false 
light the man on the firing line. We can't do or 
say too much to the glory of the salesmen who 
carry the brunt of our struggles." 

And we can say no more than to agree with Mr. 
Saunders on the importance and responsibility of 
the salesman in this industry, while in the same 
breath venturing the thought that the Jones char- 
acter is serving his purpose — no more, no less. 
The purpose being to supply a smile or two. A 
race, a nation, a religion or an industry that does 
not possess a sense of humor embracing its own 
frailties has not the breath of life. 

* * * 

WITH all his gentle chiding, we thank the 
genial Mr. Saunders for an excuse to ex- 
press a word of regard for the genus film 
salesman. We believe we have said it in print on 
more than one previous occasion, in fact we know 
we did when we were ourselves fresh from strug- 
gles with sales. 

It has been our firm conviction that there is no 
field making greater demands on the salesman than 
the film industry, placing greater responsibility on 
him— and, in the past, rewarding him as poorly. 
When we speak of rewards, we do not particularly 
mean monetary recompense. We speak rather of 
the rewards that make for contentment and 
progress. 

The producers can line up a schedule of worthy 
product New York can develop the most perfect 
of sales plans and the most effective of advertising 



surroundings — and all will fail if the man on the 
firing line fails. 

Yet think of the yawning chasm, the vast gulf 
that has existed between that man in the trenches 
and the seats of the mighty in New York. 

And in any field, you can only secure from your 
salesmen in proportion as you allow their vision 
and ambition to sight the top rung of the ladder; 
in proportion as you induce loyalty to embrace the 
men at the top. 

* * * 

WE are inclined to get our tenses mixed. Be- 
cause there are organizations in which the 
evils that make the salesman's lot a sorry 
one are fast disappearing. Perhaps some in which 
they have entirely disappeared. But there are 
others that make the present tense appropriate. 

Just as, in the ranks of the salesmen, there is a 
"Bozo" Jones to match the one who earns our 
praise or sympathy. 

So, all in all, when you come to discussion of the 
men on the firing line, you find yourself enmeshed 
in a maze of if's, and's, and but's. 

The thought has often struck us, however, that 
the percentage of "Bozo's" would be far less had 
we not driven from the field so many men capable 
of improving the balance. 

The top-notch sales recruit, making good in his 
territory, found it hard to adjust himself to the 
realization that he must lose his job every time 
New York changed sales managers, or the sales 
chief switched branch managers. 

Likewise, he found a high powered telescope 
necessary to ascertain the managers in his ter- 
ritory who had risen from the ranks. He 
quickly learned that the procedure in case of a 
(Continued on next page) 



32 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



The Editor's Views 

{Continued from preceding page) 
vacancy was to draw lots in the Astor lobby. 
* * * 

THIS method of allowing a thought to develop as you 
bang the typewriter has its advantages. It seems 
to make for safer conclusions. 
A few paragraphs above we stated a fear that our tenses 
were becoming involved. Then we went on to a discus- 
sion of the salesman's pet worries and found it necessary to 
use the past tense almost entirely. 

Correctly so. For we can recall any number of dis- 
tributing organizations that today have fairly fixed the 
rule of "promotions from the ranks only." And we are 
reminded, as our thoughts wander down the list of dis- 
tributors, of the personal loyalty that most of the sales 
managers of our industry command in full measure. 

The film salesman's lot is improving, his position advanc- 
ing. Along with the progress that all branches of the in- 
dustry are constantly recording. 

And we'll state right here that we can't do too much for 
"the man on the firing line." There are a lot of us in New 
York — and Hollywood — who owe many a "thank you" to 
him. 




Eddie Saunders. Publishing his pic- 
ture because you don't see it in print 
as often as you should. And because 
he gave us the argument that started 
this week's editorial. And — again — 
because while we get more formal in 
twelve point type this page gives us a 
chance to say "Eddie." Which is the 
proper way to speak about a chap 
as well liked and as popular as Eddie 
Saunders. And deservedly so. Eddie 
is one of the top-rung boys who came 
up the ladder. Probably explains his 
understanding of the boys at the 
front. 



Mis-Outs and Wrong Posters 

THE film salesman again. How would you like to be 
selling biscuits if the National Biscuit Company made 
as many wrong shipments, or sent damaged goods as often 
as a film company does — and then found it so difficult to 
secure satisfaction for your customer as it has been in the 
picture industry? That's another handicap under which 
the film salesman has labored. Happily, the perfection of 
an efficient Arbitration Board system is rapidly alleviating 
this condition. For which we give thanks. 



Henry Ginsberg. Young — in years; 
but old — in experience. Knows the 
territorial exchanges — and they know 
him, and have faith. The latter is the 
important part. Henry Ginsberg is go- 
ing to be heard from We venture the 
prophecy. Maybe right soon, sirs. 
Because after closing up with Pre- 
ferred Henry took train for the coast. 
Where he is conferring with import- 
ant producers. His eyes, and theirs, 
on next season. And the territorial 
market. And the building of something 
solid, permanent, holding into the 
future. 




Samuel Goldwyn. Has hit the bell 
with "Cytherea." All the sumptuous 
richness of "The Eternal City" — plus — 
greater audience value. Especially for 
American audiences. Every person 
who is married, was married, or hopes 
to get married will come to see it and 
go away to talk about it. If the adver- 
tising is built on the real meaning of 
that word "Cytherea" — and the more 
pertinent catch-line "You Can't Get 
Away With It." Samuel Goldwyn de- 
serves success. He is one producer who 
has never tried to cheat — either his 
art or his ideals. From the day when 
he lured Geraldine Farrar to the studio 
glare. 



Every Man His Otvn Code 

WE are still on the subject of the film salesman. Think- 
ing of the burden that an industry without long- 
fixed trade practices places upon the man at the point of 
contact. He has no fixed price for his merchandise, only 
a loosely drawn and constantly changing code of ethics. 
All natural in a youthful industry. But the result is that 
he finds it almost impossible to build up "customer con- 
fidence" — by far the greatest asset of the salesman in any 
other walk. The amazing part is that, with all his handi- 
caps, the film salesman DELIVERS. 



Howard Dietz. Hardly needs an in- 
troduction to the boys in New York 
— but perhaps the folks out on the 
highways and byways would like to 
see the man who has been behind those 
snappy campaigns on "Three Weeks," 
"Nellie the Beautiful Cloak Model," 
and other pictures of Goldwyn's cur- 
rent list. Howard has been turning 
out the consistently good ad copy and 
the consistently live campaigns under 
the Goldwyn trade mark for these 
many years. Young, aggressive, per- 
sonally well-liked — we are glad to 
introduce him in our gallery of illus- 
trated editorials. 



And in Closing 

ON our way to New Orleans. Intend to absorb some 
of that First National enthusiasm. There certainly 
should be plenty of it after the manner in which Dick 
Rowland has slammed the bull's-eye with hit after hit. If 
we meet Earl Hudson at the St. Charles we will try to get 
him to tell us — for you — how he does his part of it. But 
perhaps the franchise holders won't let Earl out of the 
studio while he is delivering so strongly. We wouldn't. 




May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



33 




THE METRO- 
GOLDWYN 
MERGER 

Its Meaning to 

LOEW 

Stockholders 
to 

GOLDWYN 

Stockholders 

We Have Prepared 
an Analysis of This 
Situation. Copies May 
Be Obtained on Re- 
quest at Our Offices, 
1531 B'way, at 45th St. 
Astor Theatre Bldg. 
Phone Lackawanna 7710 
and at 
511 Fifth Ave. 

at 43rd St. 
Phone Vanderbilt 4560 



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HENDERSON 
and LOEB 



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at 25th Street 

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at ASth Street 

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Moving" Picture 

WORLD 

ROBERT E. WELSH EDITOR 

Published Weekly by 
CHALMERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
516 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

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John F. Chalmers, president; Alfred J. Chalmers, vice-presi- 
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Branch Offices: 28 East Jackson Boulevard, Chicago; W. E. 
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Editorial Staff: Ben H. Grimm, Associate Editor; John A. 
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Subscription price : United States and its possessions, Mexico 
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Copyright throughout Great Britain and Colonies, under the 
provisions of the Copyright Act of 1911. (All rights reserved.) 

Other publications: Cine Mundial (Spanish). Technical books. 



VOLUME 68 



NUMBER 1 



Features 

Editorial 31 

Thumbnail Editorials 32 

Edward Saunders, Henry Ginsberg, Samuel Goldwyn, 

Howard Diets 

Is Radio Affecting You? 34 

News of the Week 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Form Giant Consolidation 37 

American Pictures Show Constant Development in Italy 39 
Branch Managers Competing for Kenma Array of Prizes 41 

Nine Big Goldwyn Productions in Works 45 

German Organization Produces, Imports and Exhibits 

pictures' 47 

Big Campaign on "Why Men Leave Home" 49 

New York Exhibitors to Convene in Buffalo 69 

Boston Convention to Hear Report on Legislative Work 70 
New York City Mark Strand Theatre Celebrates Tenth 

Anniversary ' '1 

Paramount Forms 100 Per Cent Club for its Salesmen. . 72 

Departments 

Exhibitors News and Views 51 

Straight From the Shoulder Reports 57 

Selling the Public to the Public 73 

With the Advertising Brains 81 

Reviews 83 

Pep of the Program 86 

. HQ 
Better Equipment oy 

■ 00 
Projection 

d.Io^bc 96 



One of a Series 

The Hamilton 
National Bank 

130 West 42nd Street 

IT is possible to talk 
Service, to preach 
courtesy and coopera- 
tion, to mention unex- 
celled conveniences 
and facilities — 

And still fall short 
of telling the whole 
story. 

It is impossible to 
fully realize the mean- 
ing of Hamilton Na- 
tional Service until 
you have experienced 
its features. 

Contact is convic- 
tion. 

A chat with one of 
our officials — entail- 
ing no obligation, of 
course — will give you 
new light on the place 
of modern banking in 
modern business. And 
the especial advan- 
tages to the motion 
picture man of asso- 
ciation with an Inde- 
pendent Bank, keyed 
to sympathetic under- 
standing of his prob- 
lems. 

We respectfully 
urge the visit. 

In full confidence 
that a frank discussion 
of your banking prob- 
lems and our Service 
will well repay you. 



lamilton National Bank 

130 West 42nd Street 

(Biuh Terminal BMg.) 

New York City 

Open 9 A. M. till 10.30 P. M. 
Our Deposit Vaults — open at the 
same hours — are admitted to bt 
the best equipped in the city. 



34 MOVING PICTURE WORLD May 3. 1924 

Boston Musicians Get Extra Pay for Playing for Broadcasting 



Is 

Radio 

Affecting 

You? 

Some Call It a Menace- 
Others Say It Doesn't Hurt- 
Actual Conditions Disclosed — 

[Editor's Note: Radio — Is it an ominous menace, a 
passing fad, or can it be harnessed by the enterprising 
exhibitor to prove a box-office aid? Your opinion is 
as good as ours, and the next man as wise as either of 
us. In an effort to disclose actual conditions and the 
outlook throughout the country Moving Picture World 
has put under way a survey of the country. The fol- 
lowing article presents the second installment of that 
survey. BUT WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! 
Has radio affected your business? What do you think 
of the future? What moves do you advocate to meet 
this competition? Let's have your views — join in the 
round-table discussion.] 

BOSTON. — Union musicians of Greater Boston, who, up 
to the present time, have been entertaining audiences 
throughout the country by means of the radio, hereafter 
must receive compensation for playing at all radio concerts. A 
new law inserted in the constitution and by-laws of the Boston 
Musicians' Protective Association will affect exhibitors who 
broadcast their musical programs. The State Theatre, Boston, 
under the Marcus Loew management, occasionally broadcasts 
portions of its musical programs, which are included in the pro- 
grams sent out by one of the Boston sending stations. The 
State is an exclusive first-run picture theatre. 

The new provision covering the playing for radio may result 
in making not only the managements of theatres and moving 
picture houses, but of hotels, ballrooms and other places who 
are making a practice of broadcasting concerts furnished by 
members of the association, pay double or treble the wages of 
these musicians. It was learned that the Boston local was pre- 
paring to enforce regulations that members of the executive 
board consider necessary in order to protect the interests of 
its members. 

Action Result of Complaints 

The decisive action of the Boston local was the result of com- 
plaints made by members, alleging that some of them are being 
overworked, while others are losing contract jobs as the result 
of broadcasting tactics being pursued in some instances, where 
union musicians are being used on one job to keep other mem- 
bers of the union idle. 

Similar action has been taken in other cities, including 
Chicago, where, after April 15, no union musicians, and singers 
as well, will do radio broadcasting free of charge, according to 
an announcement by James C. Petrillo, of the Chicago Federa- 
tion of Musicians. At a recent meeting of the union the decision 



was reached to charge $8 for a three-hour engagement after 
April 1 ; all appearances of less than three hours to l>e charged 
for as of three hours. 

Pittsburgh Men Want Increase 

In Pittsburgh 2,500 union musicians are seeking an increase 
in wages for radio broadcasting engagements. The musicians 
demand $8 for a three-hour engagement. The scale at the 
present time is $6. 

The matter of paying musicians for broadcasting work is 
expected to be one of the principal subjects to be discussed at 
the national convention, which will take place at Colorado 
Springs on May 2. 

MILWAUKEE— "The evil effect of radio upon the 
show business is being magnified without justifi- 
cation. Radio is not hurting business and should 
give no wide awake exhibitor cause for worry." 

That's the story most of Milwaukee's showmen tell. 
"Radio presents a great problem for motion picture- 
theatre men to solve. It is cutting a deep hole into receipts 
and is becoming more of a menace each day." 

That's the story the rest of Milwaukee's movie men tell. 
And apparently both pro and con in the argument are 
correct, for a survey shows that some houses are suffering 
as a result of the radio craze, while others continue to do 
such good business that one would think the public had 
never heard of aerials, static and the hundred and one 
other technical terms that have come to be bywords. How- 
ever, the survey indicates that those suffering from the 
radio craze still are in the minority, and for the most part 
exhibitors are confident the world will soon have enough 
of its new plaything and will return to normalcy and its 
theatres. 

Some Neighborhood Houses Suffer 

Other conclusions which may be drawn from this survey 
follow : 

Neighborhood houses located in the wealthier districts 
feel the effects of radio more than other theatres because 
their patrons are able to spend money for expensive sets, 
although this is not true of all such districts. 

Theatres in the downtown section and those neighbor- 
hoods settled by the working classes are escaping its effects 
almost entirely. 

Better pictures is one way to overcome the new evil, 
while a diversified, well balanced program is another suc- 
cessful remedy. 

Among those who see in radio a serious situation for 
exhibitors is Fred Seegert, of the Regent Theatre and 
president of the Motion Picture Theatre Owners of Wis- 
consin. Mr. Seegert has become somewhat of a radio bug 
himself, and for that reason feels that he knows whereof 
he speaks when he says : 

"Radio presents an obstacle in the path of the motion 
picture exhibitor, especially the exhibitor in the neighbor- 
hood house. It is cutting heavily into receipts and 
indications are that it will remain a handicap, if it improves 
as rapidly as it has during the last few months. Of course, 
radio can never really take the place of the movies, but at 
the same time it provides a substitute that is satisfying 
a great many. 

"Radio Bugs" Need Sleep 

"Some showmen argue that because the best radio 
programs do not begin until after 11 p. m. the show busi- 
ness does not suffer, but I have found that while radio fans 
do not become active until that time, they stay up until 
all hours of the morning and are too tired on the following 
night to go to a show even if they would give up radio for 
that long. 



May 3, 1924 MOVING PICTURE WORLD 35 

Cities With Broadcasting Stations Hit Hardest, Survey Shows 



"One way to overcome the new craze is to prevail upon 
producers to give us bigger and better pictures. The 
public has had its fill of the type of picture that is flooding 
the market at present. It wants something new and full of 
thrills dished up in a high class way. Until it gets that, the 
public will tinker with its radio instead of filling theatres." 

Mr. Seegert's theatre is in a district where many residents 
can afford radio sets. 

Believes Craze Temporary 

Henry Staab, executive secretary of the Motion Picture 
Theatre Owners of Wisconsin, who in his position keeps 
in touch with members throughout the state, declares the 
situation in some small towns is serious, but it is his 
belief that this condition will not last. He, like many 
others in the business, is inclined to regard radio as a fad 
of which the public soon will tire. He says further : 

"Most of the good programs via the radio are scheduled 
for after theatre hours. Consequently, the public can 
still attend shows as they have in the past and at the same 
time not miss the radio concerts. 

"While a few of the houses in the big cities undoubtedly 
are suffering along with the smaller exhibitors, I feel that 
the cut in movie patronage will not be permanent." 

Views of a downtown exhibitor are expressed by Roy C. 
MacMullen, manager of Ascher's Merrill Theatre, as 
follows : 

"Radio is attracting so much attention because it is 
something new. As soon as the novelty wears off, which 
can't be long, radio will in no way affect the motion picture 
business. It never can take the place of the movies and, 
as a result, the public most likely will find time for both. 
As m*!*ers stand now, I find it is to my advantage at times 
to feature radio artists in connection with my regular 
program, because there is no doubt of their popularity." 

To which Stanley Brown, new manager of Saxe's Strand, 
also a downtown house, adds: 

Can't Broadcast Pictures 

"No matter how powerful the radio stations are, they 
cannot broadcast motion pictures and the public that has 
been educated to the point of going regularly to see the 
movies will continue to go despite radio. 

"Radio at present is a fad. Even a rabid radio fan wants 
something to break the monotony of the music and 
speeches that come via the ether waves and the natural 
thing is to turn to the showhouse. 

"Phonographs, when first introduced, created a similar 
stir, but soon were no longer novelties and as a result lost 
their lure. It will be the same with radio. 

"Right now the small town houses are hit quite badly, 
but even they will overcome this and as for the downtown 
Milwaukee theatres there is little to fear." 

No Danger, Says Koch 

Charles Koch, who handles the Garden Theatre, one of 
Leo A. Landau's downtown houses, comments as follows : 

"While radio of course is yet in its experimental stage 
and it is therefore hard to predict the results to the show 
business, I am inclined to say that theatre patronage will 
not fall off because of it. Our business has not suffered 
thus far and I am convinced that great improvements must 
be made in the radio field before any harm results to us." 

George Fischer, of the Milwaukee Theatre, one of the 
finest outskirt houses in the city, is not losing any sleep 
over the radio problem. He declares he's so busy with his 
business that he has never even heard a radio, let alone 
worry about it. And Mr. Fischer is firm in his belief that 
a diversified, well-balanced program is a one hundred per 
cent, anti-toxin against the radio bugaboo. 



"Make your program so attractive that even the radio 
fan will give up a few hours to see it," is his advice. "It's 
not so much a question of big pictures as judgment hi 
arranging the entire program, being sure to give your 
patrons a little comedy, some newsreel and stage presenta- 
tions in addition to the regular feature. 

"My opinion is that radio is not hurting the business in 
Milwaukee and that for the most part other reasons are 
responsible for slackening of business that any exhibitors 
may complain of. The best programs are not broadcast 
until 10 or 11 p. m., which gives the radio fan a chance 
to take in a show and relax before tuning in. 

"My showhouse is situated in a middle class district, yet 
I doubt if many in my neighborhood can afford to own 
radio sets." 

South Side Not Worried 

Among those who declare radio is not hurting business 
is Charles Beckman of the Juneau Theatre ; on Milwaukee's 
South Side. He declares : 

"Some houses in the city may be suffering from the 
radio craze, but my theatre is patronized for the most part 
by an element that cannot afford expensive radio sets and 
for that reason my business continues unaffected." 

This sentiment is echoed by Bud Fischer, one of the 
oldest exhibitors in the business, who owns the Park Thea- 
tre on Milwaukee's South Side and who also manages the 
Capitol Theatre, at Manitowoc, Wis. 

"The smaller towns are feeling the effects of broadcast 
programs, but houses located in territories such as the 
Park Theatre are not hit because radio outfits are still not 
within reach of the average man. Besides, even if they 
were, the average person isn't satisfied to listen to radio 
night after night and would turn to the movies for diversion 
just as he does now." 

M. Rice, of the State, a West Side house, sums the situa - 
tion up briefly. 

Nothing to Worry About 

"It is nothing to worry about. We are ignoring it 
entirely." 

J. H. Silliman, of the Downer Theatre, which is in one 
of the fashionable neighborhoods of the city, declares that 
radio is cutting into the. show business somewhat at 
present, but that this condition will not last and is not to 
be regarded as serious, unless it improves at an unexpected 
rate. He says : 

"It's the same story as is presented by the phonograph. 
People like to play it occasionally, but it never keeps them 
from going to the movies." 

"End Not in Sight" 

Jack Marcus, of the Jack Marcus Enterprises, operating 
the Victoria and Royal Theatres, declares that "the end is 
not in sight" and that this opposition will grow stronger 
as the days pass. 

"The radio as a method of family entertainment is just 
now getting under way," he says. "Another year and it 
is hard to estimate just how large a percentage of our 
theatregoing families will be at home with their radio 
evenings instead of in the theatre. The concerts, too, come 
at the very time of the evening when we should expect 
our only large attendance of the entire day. When they 
knock us out of the first evening show, they cripple our 
whole day's business. And with the opening of a local 
broadcasting station here every one has just gone radio 
nutty — that's all they talk about." 



36 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



To Hold Sales Meetings 



Two Hodkinson Conventions Called by 
President Munroe 

F. C. Munroe, president of the Hodkinson 
Corporation, has called two big sales con- 
ventions of the company's branch managers 
to be held within the next three weeks. 

The first of these sales conventions is 
called for Saturday, April 26 at the home 
office of the company with managers G. A. 
Falkner of Washington, William Yoder of 
Atlanta, W. G. Humphries of Philadelphia, 
G. R. Ainsworth of Pittsburgh, L. J. Hack- 
ing of Boston, W. H. Wagner of Buffalo, 
George Dillon of New York and W. F. 
Seymour eastern division manager attend- 
ing. 

The second convention will be held at the 
Congress Hotel in Chicago on Saturday May 
3, with H. H. Hurn of Cincinnati, L. W. 
Alexander of Kansas City, R. E. Peckham of 
Detroit, C. Knickerbocker of Minneapolis, 
C. D. Hill of St. Louis, Herman Stern of 
Omaha, J. J. Mooney of Cleveland, H. S. 
Lorch of Chicago, Cecil Maberry central 
division manager and L. W. Weir western 
division manager attending. 

Vice presidents Paul Mooney and John 
Flinn will attend both conventions at which 
the Fall product which has now been lined 
up and the company's distributing plans for 
the 1924-25 season will be disclosed and dis- 
cussed in detail. 




Scenes from "The Racing Kid," a Century 
Comedy for April release. 



"Plastigrams" Get 
Unique Display 

Many striking bits of publicity, un- 
usual even in connection with features 
many times the length, have been se- 
cured by theatre managers on "Plait" - 
grams," Educational's third dimension 
movie, Educational offices report. 

Perhaps the most unusual and striking 
was a full page story and layout of cuts 
which appeared in the St. Paul "Daily 
News" of Sunday, April 6. The story 
and illustrations were planted in the 
paper by B. C. Ferris, manager of ad- 
vertising and publicity for the Finkel- 
stein & Ruben circuit of theatres. The 
illustrations occupied a full half page 
and with the story, gave a lucid ex- 
planation of how the stereoscopic effect 
is secured. 



A Diversified Program 



Muc'.i Entertainment in Pathe's April 
27 Releases 

Will Rogers in "Highbrow Stuff" and 
Harry Langdon in "Flickering Youth," head 
Pathe's program of releases for April 27. 
"Get Busy," a single-reel Hal Roach comedy 
featuring "Snub" Pollard, and "The Be- 
trayal," sixth chapter of the Patheserial 
"Leatherstocking," are also prominent num- 
bers on this program. 

"An Ideal Farm" is the latest Aesop's Film 
Fable. Pathe Review No. 17 includes "Pho- 
tographic Gems," a collection of picturesque 
views of Bear Creek Canyon, Colorado ; "The 
Secret of Soft Coal," an interesting number 
of the "Popular Science Series ;" "How the 
American Flag Is Made at Philadelphia," an 
instructional feature with a patriotic appeal, 
and "When Winter Comes," a Pathecolor 
presentation of scenes taken at the famous 
holiday resort at Cinta, Portugal. 

Also for release on April 27 is the second 
of the Will Nigh miniatures, titled "The 
Guest." The first of these single-reel 
"punch" dramas, "Among the Missing," was 
released February 17, and has been meeting 
with considerable success. Will Nigh di- 
rected and the important roles are played 
by Leslie Stowe, Beryl Mercer and Fred 
Jones. They are prominent Broadway actors. 



Phyfe Uses Pastels 

Hal Phyfe, well known pastel portrait art- 
ist, who decorated the Astor Theatre lobby 
for Norma Talmadge's "Secrets," is one of 
the first artists to introduce the idea of us- 
ing original pastels instead of the highly 
colored, shiny lithographic photographs 
which have heretofore decorated motion pic- 
ture lobbies. Mr. Phyfe made a series of 
thirteen pastels of Miss Talmadge. This 
lobby has attracted considerable attention 
because of its simplicity, its artistic nicety 
and its unusualness. Several forthcoming 
productions are now negotiating for similar 
series of pastels to be used as an aid to ex- 
ploitation. 



"The Spirit of U. S. A." 

"The Spirit of the U. S. A.," and not 
"Honor Your Mother," is the final title of 
the fifth Emory Johnson production for the 
Film Booking Offices. 



New Franchise Holder 

Denver Publisher Takes Warner 
Policy for Four Western States 

A slight re-alignment in the franchise 
holders for Warner Bros. Classics of the 
Screen took place last week when a deal was 
consummated whereby Frank Barmettler, a 
prominent Denver publisher, took over the 
Denver office of Kwality Pictures, distribu- 
tors of the Warner product. 

The Denver office, under the new arrange- 
ment, becomes an individual exchange cov- 
ering the territory consisting of Colorado, 
Utah, Wyoming and New Mexico. L. T. 
Fidler, a well known Middle West exchange 
executive, has been installed as manager. 

L. K. Brin who formerly operated the 
Denver branch of Kwality pictures in con- 
junction with his main office in Seattle, will 
continue to handle the Warner franchise 
for the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho 
and Montana and the new arrangement will 
enable Mr. Brin to devote his personal at- 
tention to these four states. 



Buys Foreign Rights 

The Inter-Ocean Corp. has acquired the 
European distribution rights to Screen Snap- 
shots, a C. B. C. single-reel series, better 
known as "The Fan Magazine of the 
Screen." The Hall Room Boys Comedies 
has also been sold by the company to the 
Selco Company for distribution in Austral- 
asia. 




Neal Burns in "Dandy Lions," an Educa- 
tional-Christie Comedy Directed by Archie 
Mayo 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



37 



Metro, Goldwyn, Cosmopolitan and 
L. B. Mayer in Giant Consolidation 



METRO PICTURES, Goldwyn Pic- 
tures and Louis B. Mayer Company 
this week formally merged their im- 
mense holdings into an amalgamation which 
will also include the distribution of Cosmo- 
politan Productions. "The combined com- 
pany will in point of magnitude, influence, 
and physical scope be the peer of any other 
film organization in the world," says the an- 
nouncement. The negotiations, which have 
been in progress for some time, were initi- 
ated by F. J. Godsol, president of Goldwyn, 
and were completed with the signing of pa- 
pers by the principals. Marcus Loew will 
head the new company. 

The name of the merged corporation will 
be Metro-Goldwyn Corporation. In addition 
to F. J. Godsol, Edward Bowes, vice-presi- 
dent of Goldwyn, will be on the Board of 
Directors and actively associated with the 
amalgamated company, as will also be Mess- 
more Kendall and William Braden. Louis 
B. Mayer will be vice-president in charge of 
all production activities. 

The consolidation is intended to eliminate 
waste in production, to make bigger and 
better pictures at less cost, to furnish better 
service to exhibitors and to accomplish a 
tremendous saving in distribution. The mer- 
ger will in no way submerge the Goldwyn 
company or eliminate or curtail its produc- 
ing and distributing organization. 

Goldwyn executives and the Goldwyn or- 
ganization will be retained throughout. 
Abraham Lehr, vice-president of Goldwyn, 
in charge of its studios, has not yet indi- 
cated whether he will remain with the 
merged company. This statement, issued by 
Marcus Loew, is a flat denial of various 
unfounded reports that Goldwyn would dis- 
appear from the field after the merger with 
Metro. 

The amalgamation brings to the support 
of Metro-Goldwyn the immense Loew chain 
of theatres and the large number of houses 
which Goldwyn at present controls through- 
out the country, the most important being 




the Capitol Theatre, New York. Goldwyn 
owns a half interest in the Capitol, the other 
half interest being owned by the Moredall 
Realty Corporation, of which Messmore 
Kendall is president and Edward Bowes vice- 
president and managing director. The pol- 
icy and personnel of the Capitol will remain 
absolutely unchanged. Also included in the 
deal are two theatres in Los Angeles, the 




LOUIS B. MAYER 
Vice-president in charge of production of 
Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer. 



MARCUS LOEW 

Who heads the new consolidation of 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

California and Miller's; theatres in Seattle 
and Tacoma, Wash., and Portland, Oregon, 
of which one-half is owned by Goldwyn and 
one-half by W. R. Hearst; also the Ascher 
Circuit of houses in Chicago and adjacent 
territory, comprising more than twenty the- 
atres in which Goldwyn Company owns a 
one-half interest. 

The Goldwyn Studios at Culver City, Cal., 
covering forty acres, are included in the 
merger and will be the producing center of 
the combined companies. 

Mr. Loew, in commenting on the amalga- 
mation and explaining the status of the four 
companies in the merger, added : 

"The motion picture business is going 
through a stabilizing process and is working 
itself out on sane economic principles. 
Through combining our forces in the best 
interests of all parties to the merger, Metro, 
Goldwyn, Cosmopolitan and Louis B. Mayer 
Company are going a long way in the right 
direction. In order to obtain the greatest 
efficiency and economy in production such 
a step was inevitable. 

"Every other business has experienced the 
same difficulties in its beginnings, and has 
come to realize the economic necessity of 
centralization. In the railroad business, for 
instance, this was brought about by the 
Union Pacific, the Southern Pacific, the 
Central Pacific and the Illinois Central, who 
gradually achieved the amalgamation of all 
the western roads. They were centralized, 
as they are today, yet all retain their in- 
dividuality. 



"The merger will accomplish mutual sav- 
ings that will react to the benefit of the ex- 
hibitor, and through the exhibitor to the 
public, which is what we wish to bring 
about." 

Ma reus Loew's position as the heaviest 
theatre owner in the country will be greatly 
strengthened. 

The combined organization of Metro, 
Goldwyn, Cosmopolitan and Mayer will have 
for release the coming season, as a result of 
the merger, such immense productions as 
"Ben Hur," now being filmed in Italy by 
arrangement with A. L. Erlanger; Rex In- 
gram's "The Arab," recently filmed in North 
Africa; Marshall Neilan's "Tess of the 
D'Urbervilles," now being completed, and 
Eric Von Stroheim's "Greed," which has 
been a year in the making. 

Other celebrated directors for the new 
amalgamation will include Clarence Badger, 
Reginald Barker, Frank Borzage, Charles 
Brabin, Edward Cline, Alan Crosland, Scott 
Dunlap, Emmett Flynn, Hobart Henley, E. 
Mason Hopper, Rupert Hughes, Robert Z. 
Leonard, Fred Niblo, Harry Rapf, J. Parker 
Read, Jr., Victor Schertzinger, Victor Sea- 
strom, King Vidor and Robert Vignola. 

A partial list of the famous stars who will 
be seen in pictures of the new organization 
includes the following : Renee Adoree, Edith 
Allen, T. Roy Barnes, Monte Blue, Betty 
Blythe, Eleanor Boardman, Hobart Bos- 
worth, Mae Busch, Francis X. Bushman, 
Lew Cody, William Collier, Jr., Jackie Coo- 
gan, Pedro de Cordoba, Virginia Lee Corbin, 
William H. Crane, Viola Dana, Marjorie 
Daw, Robert Edeson, Leon Errol, George 
Fawcett, Louise Fazenda, W. C. Fields, Lynn 
Fontanne, Robert Frazer, Pauline Garon, 
Lillian Gish, Huntley Gordon, Ralph Graves, 
Creighton Hale, Mahlon Hamilton, Raymond 
Hatton, Walter Hiers, Stuart Holmes, Hedda 
Hopper, Jobyna Howland, Gail Kane, Bus- 
ter Keaton, Norman Kerry, Kathleen Key, 
James Kirkwood, Barbara La Marr, Alfred 
Lunt, Edmund Lowe, Percy Marmont, Tully 
Marshall, Adolph Menjou, James Morrison, 




FRANK J. GODSOL 
President, Goldwyn Pictures Corporation. 



38 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Mae Murray. Conrad Nagel, Ramon No- 
varro, Pat O'Malley, ZaSu Pitts, Aileen 
Pringle, Alma Rubens, Oscar Shaw, Norma 
Shearer, Wyndham Standing, Anita Stew- 
art, Lewis Stone, Ruth Stonehouse, Blanche 
Sweet, Laurette Taylor, Alice Terry, Johnnie 
Walker, George Walsh and Gaire Windsor. 

Among current productions of the com- 
bined companies are "A Boy of Flanders," 
"Don't Doubt Your Husband," "Happiness," 
"Mademoiselle Midnight," "Name the Man," 
"Nellie the Beautiful Cloak Model," "Recoil," 
"Reno," "Scaramouche," "Second Youth," 
"Sherlock Jr.," "The Great White Way," 
"The Rejected Woman," "The Shooting of 
Dan McGrew," "The Uninvited Guest," "The 
White Sister," "Three Weeks," "Through 
the Dark," "Thy Name Is Woman," "True 
as Steel," "Under the Red Robe," "Unseeing 
Eyes," "WHd Oranges" and "Women Who 
Give." 

Big productions to be released by the new 
amalgamation the coming season will include 
the following : "A Cigarette Maker's Ro- 
mance," "Along Came Ruth," "Bread," "Bro- 
ken Barriers," "Circe," "Danger," "Dixie," 
"East of Suez," "Enemies by Command," 
"Every Woman's Experience," "Fashions for 
Man," "Flames of Blue Ridge," "Foolish 
Youth," "Free Love," "Greater Light," "His 
Hour," "Is Marriage a Failure?," "Jason," 
"Judgment of Men," "Little Robinson Cru- 
soe," "Married Strangers," "Mary the 
Third," "Nothing to Wear," "One Night in 
Rome," "Playthings of Desire," "Revela- 
tion, Rust," "Span of Life," "The Bando- 
lero," "The Beauty Prize," "The Bitter Cup," 
"The Dead Command," "The Goose Man," 
"The Great Divide," "The Hero," "The Mer- 
ry Widow," "The Middleman," "The Red 
Lily," "The Snob," "The Trail of '98," "The 
Tree of the Garden," "The Volunteer Or- 
ganist," "The Waning Sex," "The World's 
Illusion," "Toilers of the Sea," "Watch Your 
Wife," "Wife of the Centaur" and many 
others. 

A few of the famous authors whose works 
are announced for production by the new 
organization include Rex Beach, Rachel 
Crothers, Elinor Glyn, Benjamin Glazer, 
Thomas Hardy, Frederick and Fanny Hat- 
ton, Victor Hugo, Vicente Blasco Ibanez, J. 
Hartley Manners, June Mathis, Franz Mol- 
nar, Charles Norris, Frank Norris, Nina Wil- 
cox Putnam, Jacob Wasserman and H. C. 
Witwer. 




EDWARD BOWES 
Vice-president of Goldwyn Pictures 
Corporation. 




The Play, From The Picture Angle 

By Robert G. Lisnian ■ 



. b /""HEAPER TO MARRY," by Samuel Shipman, presented at the 49th Street 
v>" Theatre by Richard Herndon on April 15th, 1924. 

Here is something for the gentlemen who manufacture motion pictures for the 
State Right market. As the saying goes, "the title will sell it." 

This play is a comidrama, dealing with two partners who each take unto themselves 
a woman, one using the ring method and the other dispensing with it. Of course as this 
play has a moral, as the title indicates, the beringed couple wins out and achieves hap- 
piness. 

If the picture censors should be invited to use their red pencil on this play as it now 
stands, the show would be over at ten minutes of nine, but with discreet titling, the 
picture version could give the public what they so much desire without offending the 

censors. 

Only two sets are used in the play, and few more would be necessary in the pic- 
ture. As a play, and also when this property becomes a picture, it will belong in the 
class with "Nellie the Beautiful Cloak Model" and the production should be handled 
in the same manner as Mr. Flynn has done with the aforesaid. 

Unless Mr. Shipman is foolish enough to insist on a five figure ransom, this wedding 
ring moral will be distributed to the public by the screen in large doses ere the summer 
is over. 

h EXPRESSING WILLIE," a comedy by Rachel Crothers, presented at the 48th 
-L Street Theatre by Equity Players, Inc., on April 16th, 1924. 

If the screen could do this play justice and be profitable to the producer, there might 
be cause for fear that the speaking drama would lose its footing. It certainly would 
take a director with at least a "Black Oxen" or a "Flaming Youth" to his credit 
to handle "Expressing Willie." 

Willie, the tooth paste millionaire's, adventures are not complicated. They concern 
themselves with Minnie, his small-town sweetheart who arrives on the scene in time 
to save him from a high-brow fortune hunter. The latter has a great deal to say 
about teaching Willie to "express himself." 

There is much talk in this play about "expressing yourself." It might be said to 
be the theme. There is arso a musical number with that title which is bound to be ex- 
tremely popular and will help the picture along when this property gets to that state. 

nl EAH KLESCHNA," the melodrama by C. M. S. McLellan. A revival, presented 
J—/ by William A. Brady with an all star cast, at the Lyric Theatre on April 21st. 

A picture has been made of this play by Famous Players, with Dorothy Dalton as 
the star. It was released within the month under the title of "The Moral Sinner." 

Lowell Sherman's performance in the play makes the usual screen villain seem like a 
tame juvenile. 

No picture star's rise has been more meteoric than the stage career of Helen 
Gahagan. When this young lady is a Venus among the stars of Broadway many a 
picture producer will regret that he has not some pictures on the shelf with Miss 
Gahagan in them. 



Mayer Arrives on Coast 



Thalberg and Rapf Are Associated 
With New Production Head 

Louis B. Mayer, newly elected vice pres- 
ident in charge of all production activities 
of the amalgamated Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 
Corporation, who will have associated with 
him two of the best known executives in 
the industry, Irving G. Thalberg and Harry 
Rapf, has arrived with his staff at the Cali- 
fornia studios of his company and assumed 
charge of the numerous producing units at 
work there. Production plans being laid 
are the most extensive in the history of the 
combined organizations. 

Irving G. Thalberg, who has been with 
Mr. Mayer the past year, was formerly di- 
rector general of the Universal Company. 
Harry Rapf, one of the best known inde- 
pendent producers in the industry, with a 
long record of consistent box-office suc- 
cesses, was releasing under the Warner ban- 
ner just previous to joining the Mayer 
forces. He will make three productions for 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 




JAMES R. GRAINGER 
General Manager of Sales, Goldwyn-Cosmo- 
politan Distributing Corporation. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



39 



American Motion Pictures Show 

Constant Development in Italy 



By W. STEPHEN BUSH 

Rome, March 20. 
(Special to Moving Picture World) 

WHILE the production of films is 
diminishing in every country in 
Europe, nowhere has the decadence 
of the native motion picture been more com- 
plete and deplorable than here in Italy. This 
wonderful country, rich in motion picture pos- 
sibilities, at one time near the head of the 
procession, today is a negligible quantity in 
the international markets. American firms 
have come here (plus modern American light- 
ing systems, be it well understood) and have 
seen and conquered without an effort. Amer- 
ican companies at this very moment are work- 
ing in Italy, one with Lillian Gish and Di- 
rector Henry King in Florence, the other the 
Goldwyn Company making preparations for 
"Ben Hur" out in the old Cines studio by the 
gate of St. John, where many years ago "Quo 
Vadis" was made. 

I strolled out to the Cines studio the other 
day. No one was there but an electrician 
named Kolb, who is addressing himself 
assiduously to his task of modernizing the 
electric plant. The old studio certainly has 
a look of unpreparedness and will need a 
lot of attention before the camera can be set 
to work. Such at least is the opinion of Di- 
rector Charles J. Brabin, whom I found at 
the Excelsior Hotel only yesterday. Mr. 
Brabin said that he expected to get busy about 
the first of April. The changes necessary on 
the Cines grounds and in the studio proper 
will take weeks, Mr. Brabin said. He told 
me that all the necessary legal arrangements 
with the Cines people, or, in this case, the 
Unione Cinematografica Italiana, had been 
completed to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Mr. Brabin was giving a good deal of 
attention to the study of the galleys to be 
used in the famous scene on the sea. Probably 
a spot on the Tyrrhenian sea will be chosen 
because it is easily reached from Rome. As 
a large number of slaves must be seen perish- 
ing in the waves, Mr. Brabin wants to wait 
till the water is a bit warmer, which it surely 
will be in April. Mr. Brabin thought that 
the cost of the production might be kept down 
to about 50,000,000 lire. This money will be 
expended carefully and judiciously, and every 
lira must render a proper account of itself. 
Mr. Brabin is full of energy and enthusiasm 
and thoroughly absorbed in his task. He 
hinted that there would be new sensations in 
photography and promised to be more ex- 
plicit as soon as the work of the camera is 
properly under way. 

Going back to the subject of Italian and 
foreign pictures, I have convinced myself from 
observations in almost every part of the king- 
dom that the percentage of American-made 
pictures has substantially increased since last 
year. Probably 90 per cent of the pictures 
shown are American in origin, while the other 
10 per cent may be divided between native and 
other foreign films, mostly German. United 
Artists and Universal are doing the biggest 
business. It is to be noted in this connection 
that the Fascisti are on record as offering their 
help to American or other foreign producers 
who may wish to come here to take advantage 



of the scenic and historic backgrounds. Their 
attitude at first was one of suspicion; it has 
changed to an attitude of helpful hospitality. 

A remarkable feature of the situation in 
Italy is this : While the screen produces lit- 
tle, and that little mostly below par, the present 
day literature of Italy is in an exceptionally 
flourishing condition. Dramatic literature par- 




LLOYD HAMILTON 

In "Killing Time," an Educational-Hamil- 
ton Comedy directed by Fred Hibbard 



ticularly has been fertile in first-class produc- 
tions, equal, to say the least, to the best plays 
of either England or the United States. Dario 
Niccodemi and Luigi Pirandello have achieved 
a fame that has traveled far beyond the con- 
fines of Italy. There are other names of 
scarcely less renown. 

Although some of the plays of Niccodemi 
have been filmed, and many more of them are 
quit filmable, the Italian producers, who have 
made the attempt, have distinctly failed to 
do justice to their subject. The great play 
"L'Ombra" ("The Shadow"), recently filmed 
by a subsidiary concern of the Unione C. I., 
has been a failure. The fault lies chiefly in 
the cast. The actress selected to play "The 
Shadow" was quite unsuited to her part. No 
histrionic ability was discoverable in any of 
the principal characters of the play. This is 
the opinion of the best film critics of Italy. 
The same play has been produced both on 
the British and the American stage with Ethel 
Barrymore in the leading part and has achieved 
a creditable success. 

It might be interesting to inquire into the 
causes of this decay of the Italian film, but 
that would be a long and rather involved story. 
Two of the causes were reckless expenditure 
and expensive promotion. The attempt to 
bring all the Italian producing concerns under 
one control and eliminate competition has de- 
stroyed much of the initiative and independence 
without which the industry cannot endure and 
prosper. 

In Italy more people go to the picture thea- 
tres than either in France or in Germany. No 
people respond more quickly to quality in pic- 
tures than the people of Italy. They are lively 
and intelligent and they appreciate the good 
drama and the good comedy. No country of- 
fers greater opportunities for American capital 
either in the producing or the exhibiting 
branches of our industry. The methods of 
exhibition and the ideas of showmanship are 
behind the times here as everywhere else in 
Europe, but from the way the Italians respond 
to every effort to please them it is certain that 
a first-class picture house conducted on Amer- 
ican principles would pay big dividends. Italy 
is one of the coming countries of Europe. It 
is orderly, prosperous, and the people are, as 
they have been since Caesar's time, fond of 
good amusement. 



U. S. Film in Chile 

The Chileans are enthusiastic movie "fans," 
and all their large cities and towns have a 
generous quota of movie houses, according 
to advices to the Department of Commerce. 
In the villages where it would not pay to 
build a movies theatre, the show is often 
given in the local church. A decided prefer- 
ence is shown for American films, the Italian 
films taking second place. The United States 
furnishes about 66 per cent of all films 
shown, while Italy's share is around IS per 
cent. 



Signs Katherine Lee 

Katherine Lee, of the Jane and Katherine 
Lee sister team, has been cast for the role 
of Evadne in Herbert Brenon's Paramount 
production, "The Mountebank." 



40 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 




Scenes from "The Rejected Wonian," a Distinctive Production distributed by Goldwyn. 



Educational Lists 6 Comedies 
of Diversified Nature for May 



Starts Fourth of Series 



Edward Laemmle Directing New- 
Episode of "Fast Steppers" 

Edward Laemmle has begun the filming of 
the fourth of the "Fast Steppers" series of 
race track stories at Universal City in which 
Billy Sullivan is starred. Three of the series 
have been completed. 

The story is "Shooting Star," based on one 
of Gerald Beaumont's stories of "The In- 
formation Kid." It has its setting at Tia 
Juana and after a few days' shooting of in- 
terior scenes at the studio the company will 
go to the border sporting center for shots at 
the track and paddock. 

Shannon Day and James Quinn are sup- 
porting Sullivan in this picture. 



English Like "Rosita" 

Mary Pickford has been anxiously await- 
ing news of how the public in England would 
receive "Rosita," which Ernst Lubitsch di- 
rected. The news came last week in the fol- 
lowing cable despatch from A. W. Lyons, 
manager of the Brighton Academy, Brighton, 
England, where "Rosita" was given its first 
foreign presentation : "Capacity audiences 
applaud 'Rosita' and England congratulates 
you and salutes the 'World's Sweetheart.' " 



SIX two-reel subjects of widely varying 
nature will form the backbone of Ed- 
ucational's program for May. Two 
Christie Comedies of differing character will 
be released during the month, as will be 
one each of the Hamilton, Tuxedo, Mermaid 
and Juvenile brands. These two-reel sub- 
jects will be supported by eight single-reel 
pictures of the Cameo brand, Secrets of 
Life, Hodge-Podge, Sing Them Again se- 
ries, Bruce Wilderness Tales and the new 
Fun Shop series. 

Bobby Vernon is starred in the first two- 
reel comedies, released during the first week 
of the month. Vernon is seen as a small 
town Romeo in a comedy that contains 
more broad situations than is usually found 
in the Christie Comedies. 

Lloyd Hamilton's "Going East" will be 
released the second week of the month. 
Hamilton will be supported by Ruth Hiatt 
and Dick Sutherland in a novel comedy 
taken almost entirely in a setting of the in- 
terior of a Pullman car. The comedy was 
directed by Fred Hibbard. 

"Out Bound," a single reel Cameo comedy 
released the same week, will present the pop- 
ular trio, Cliff Bowes, Sid Smith and Vir- 
ginia Vance, in a fast action, slapstick com- 
edy, while one of the most interesting sub- 
jects of the "Secrets of Life" series so far 
released will be presented in "The Lady 
Bird." This subject should prove especially 
interesting to audiences, as it shows the 
little insect as a real friend of man, as it is 
the deadly enemy of the mealy bug, or 
scale, which would quickly destroy the citrus 
fruit industry unless held in check by the 
Lady Bird. 

"Nerve Tonic," the second Christie of the 
month, will be released during the week 



starting May 18, and "The Bonehead," a 
Tuxedo Comedy with the inimitable 
"Poodles" Hanneford starred, will make this 
week's releases especially attractive to thea- 
tres looking for good comedies. Lyman H. 
Howe's Hodge-Podge, "A Tiny Tour of the 
U. S. A.," and "Lost Chords," of the "Sing 
Them Again" series of song-pictures, will 
complete the schedule of the week. 

Two two-reel comedies will also be re- 
leased the last week of the month in the 
Mermaid Comedy, "Air Pockets," an air- 
plane comedy with Lige Conley and the 



COLORS were made to beautify nature, 
not to be the result of mathematics 
or precision,'' observes A. L. Godoy, 
vice-president, treasurer and secretary of 
Reel-Colors, located in New York City. 

It would take many pages, says Mr. Godoy, 
to describe his invention of mechanical col- 
oring of film. The multi-coloring of certain 
scenes in modern productions will be a ne- 
cessity once the slogan, "See it in colors," 
is appreciated in all its worth, predicts this 
inventor. It would be just as consistent 
and conscientious to suppress all coloring in 
photographs and advertising if appropriate 
scenes in the film reel are to remain a plain 
black and white, Godoy remarks. 



Pan Berman Returns 

Pan Berman, son of H. M. Berman, gen- 
eral sales manager of F. B. 0. has returned 
to New York from Hollywood, for a short 
visit. Pan, though only twenty years old, is 
attached to the Al Santell company film- 
ing "Fools in the Dark" and starring Matt 
Moore and Patsy Ruth Miller. 

familiar Mermaid cast, and "The Junior 
Partner," a Juvenile comedy with Johnnie 
Fox, Jr., Tommy Hicks, Jack McHugh and 
other well-known juvenile comedians. Rob- 
ert Bruce's "Flowers of Hate," an outdoor 
drama with a sudden comedy twist, and 
"Powder Marks" with the Cameo trio, will 
conclude the month's releases. 

Kinograms, the news reel, will be re- 
leased twice a week, and the newly acquired 
"Fun Shop" series, the reel of original hu- 
mor with the huge newspaper tie-up, will 
be released every other week. 



"Let us come to the real reason for the 
prejudice against colors," says Godoy. "One 
thing must be borne in mind which is indis- 
putable : that so far, every scene is impos- 
sible to color by hand or mechanically, and 
that color photography has not been per- 
fected to the extent of making it econom- 
ically practicable. What remains then? To 
select the scenes you are to color. And 
who is to select them? The producer or 
distributor who knows little of colors? Or 
the man who knows something of colors? 
The answer is obvious." 

Mr. Godoy estimates that he can multi- 
color a maximum of 15,000 feet per day. "I 
can 'color' what I 'see' in order that you 
may also 'See it in colors."' 



Godoy Advances Argument for 
Multi-coloring Some Scenes 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



41 



Metro-Goldwyn Report 

Newburger, Henderson & Loeb, mem- 
bers of the New York Stock Exchange, 
have just completed a comprehensive 
report on the Metro-Goldwyn merger. 
This concern has prepared a detailed 
report on the merger covering every 
angle of interest to Loew and Goldwyn 
stockholders. This is the second of a 
series of reports covering motion picture 
issues listed on the "Big Board," the 
first being on Famous Players. Copies 
of both reports can be obtained from 
General Manager Daniel Loeb at the 
Newburger, Henderson & Loeb uptown 
offices, 1531 Broadway, New York City. 



Completes New Play 

William de Mille has completed the filming 
of Qara Beranger's mystery drama, "The 
Bedroom Window,'' and has begun cutting 
the production at the Lasky studio. Next 
week he will leave for New York, where he 
will edit and title the production with Mrs. 
Beranger at the Paramount studios in Long 
Island. "The Bedroom Window" boasts a 
cast which is noted for ensemble acting. It 
consists of May McAvoy, Malcolm Mc- 
Gregor, Ricardo Cortez, Ethel Wales, Rob- 
ert Edeson, George Fawcett and others. 



Company Reorganized 

The re-organization of the Pacific Studios, 
of San Mateo, a suburb of San Francisco, 
Cal., with a capitalization of $1,000,000 has 
been announced by President W. H. Pear- 
son. Creditors will be given preferred 
stock in the new corporation and stock- 
holders will receive common stock. The 
property will be leased to the Connery- 
Dohrmann interests, who will shortly com- 
mence work on pictures for release through 
W. W. Hodkinson Corporation. 




Branch Managers Competing 
for Kenma Array of Prizes 



THE equity in a new home, a $25 a week 
increase in salary and a $500 dinner 
ring — these are prizes offered by the 
Kenma Corporation, producer of "Three 
Miles Out," for collections on that feature. 
The recipients are to be branch managers 
of Associated Exhibitors, the distributor of 
the attraction. 

"Three Miles Out," the story of which 
is by John Emerson and Anita Loos, is the 
thrilling melodrama in which Madge Ken- 
nedy is now winning fresh laurels as an 
actress of the silver sheet. Only recently 
released, the picture already is off to a flying 
start, Associated officials say. Harold C. 
Bolster is the head of the Kenma Corpora- 
tion. 

The awards are to go to the managers 
who have most nearly realized their quotas 
on the picture at the close of business on 
August 16 next. The contest began sev- 
eral days ago, when the announcement 
was broadcast to the exchange branches, 
and thus will continue four months. Busi- 
ness already done on the picture will count. 
Net collections from each office on the clos- 
ing date will be compared with territorial 
expectancies and the prizes will be awarded 
to the managers who have realized the great- 
est percentage of their quota. In the event 
of any ties, each of those so tying will be 
awarded the full amount of the prize tied 
for. 

In the assignment of quotas considera- 
tion has been given to the size of a given 
district, the number of theatres, their char- 
acter, the size and character of the towns in 
the district, and the size of collections from 
these particular localities on previous 
pictures. 

The winner of the first prize, an equity 
in a house and lot — a home — may buy a 
place already built, the statement of con- 
ditions explains, or the producer and As- 
sociated will do the building. The winner 
himself selects the location and plans and 
the cost may be what he decrees, up to a 
$10,000 maximum. One-third of the gross 
amount will be advanced in cash as a first 
payment. This will be the producer's con- 
tribution and will enable the buyer to carry 
the remainder in first and second mort- 
gages which can be paid off as rent. 

The second prize is the salary increase 
of $25 a week, which is to be added to what- 
ever amount the winner is being paid at the 
time the award is made. To the winner of 




third place goes a dinner ring costing $500. 

Discussing the list of awards and the 
competition it has aroused among the branch 
managers, J. S. Woody, general manager of 
Associated Exhibitors said: "Associated is 
deeply appreciative of this generous offer. 
The prizes themselves are of such generous 
proportions — so practical and valuable — that 
the vocabulary I possess falls far short of 
expressing my enthusiasm over the pro- 
ducer's liberality." 



To Handle Garrick Film 

Associated First National Pictures, Inc., 
will distribute the first production of the 
recently formed Garrick Pictures Corpora- 
tion, a New York State corporation, capi- 
talized at $200,000, with offices at 247 Park 
avenue. 

The picture is "Born Rich," by Hughes 
Cornell, a story which has been running 
serially in sixteen Hearst newspapers, and 
which is about to be issued in novel form. 
Through the courtesy of E. L. Smith, Will 
Nigh has been signed as the director of 
this picture, which is to be made at the 
Biograph studios in New York, with T. A. 
Persons as production manager. The cast 
has not as yet been announced. 



Finish "Code of the Sea" 

Director Victor Fleming has completed 
the filming of his Paramount production, 
"Code of the Sea," featuring Rod La Rocque 
and Jacqueline Logan. The entire company 
spent most of the last two weeks of work 
photographing the thrilling spectacle of four 
ships at sea in a tremendous storm. Byron 
Morgan's story was adapted by Bertram 
Millhauser. 




Scenes from "Not One to Spare," a Renaud Hoffman production for distribution by W. W. Hodkinson Corporation. 



42 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 




Scenec from First National's "The White Moth" with Barbara La Marr and 

Conway Tearle 



Easter Crowds Jam Strand 
to See Lloyd's ''Girl Shy » 



TEN deep standing in the rear and a 
line outside resembling Chaliapin 
night at the Metropolitan greeted the 
new Harold Lloyd comedy, 'Girl Shy,' at 
the Strand yesterday." 

Thus does Quinn Martin of the New York 
Morning World describe the opening of 
Harold Lloyd's latest comedy feature for 
Pathe at the Mark Strand Theatre, New 
York, on Easter Sunday, April 20. Early 
in the week, Joe Plunkett, managing di- 
rector of the Strand, convinced that the 
house was to experience attendances sur- 
passing all previous figures, decided upon 
an extra showj opening at 11 a. m. instead 
of 1 :30 p. m. 

Photoplay critics of the New York dailies 
vied with each other in paying tributes. Mr. 
Martin of the World, after testifying to the 
great drawing power of the new Lloyd com- 
edy, describes its reaction on the big Strand 
audience in the following language : 

"The 2 o'clock audience yesterday began 
giggling when the title was flashed across 
the silver sheet, and increased in its mirth 
until, along toward the end, it was won- 
dering seriously whether quiet ever could be 
restored." 

Harriette Underhill of the Herald-Tribune 
also singled out the drawing power of the 
comedy for special mention : 

"Because some one has been magnanimous 
enough to reserve a special box for critics 
at the Strand Theatre, we were able to 
watch 'Girl Shy' and sit at the same time 
yesterday, a thing which we had not be- 
lieved possible as we were fighting our way 
through the crowds on the sidewalk. 

"It sounds so foolish to say that Harold 



Lloyd's latest picture is his funniest. One 
just keeps on saying that after each come- 
dy he makes, but it really does seem as 
though this one is the funniest." 

Don Allen of the Evening World in his 
review column said : 

"We have seldom, if ever, heard more 
laughs per minute than rocked the Strand 
yesterday during the showing of Harold 
Lloyd in his latest picture, 'Girl Shy.' And 
that's saying a great deal, because we have 
seen both Chaplin and Lloyd in the same 
theatre many times before.'' 

The photoplay critic of the New York 
Evening Sun commented: 

"Anything to be said about Harold Lloyd's 
'Girl Shy' at the Strand should be said with 
chuckles. It is foolish to attempt to put 
laughter into words. We enthusiastically 
and amid hearty guffaws recommend it as 
a thing of unflagging delight and invention, 
of laughter almost uninterrupted." 

Fred Hall of the New York Times re- 
marked : 

"Those who went to the Strand yesterday 
to see Harold Lloyd in 'Girl Shy' apparent- 
ly forgot about the Easter showers in their 
merriment over this picture, which is filled 
with farcical sequences. Mr. Lloyd is a 
genius in obtaining and making the most 
of new ideas to bring happiness to audi- 
ences." 



Birskin Resigns 

Samuel J. Birskin, for three years with 
C. B. C. Film Sales Corp., as secretary and 
office manager, has resigned. He is formu- 
lating plans for the organization of a new 
state rights company. 



Specials to Be Biggest 



New Series of Columbia Features to 
Be Best of C. B. C. Productions 

C. B. C. Film Sales Corporation are at the 
present time forming extensive plans on 
their new series of eight Columbia specials 
in which the biggest stars of the industry 
will be cast. 

The eight Columbia specials are to be of 
a variety entirely different from the average 
motion picture and will be staged along the 
dignified and entertaining lines of the most 
popular plays and books. F. Heath Cobb, 
head of the C. B. C. Scenario Department, 
will supervise the selection of stories to 
be used in these productions. 

In regard to this series, President Joe 
Brandt of C. B. C. said: "On my travels 
to the key centers in the local territory, I 
made an intensive study of the class and 
character of production that appeals to the 
moving picture patron. What did I find? 
Without a dissenting voice, the opinions ex- 
pressed confirmed my original idea that high 
class dramas with tense stories are in ever 
increasing demand. What the public want 
and what they will patronize are produc- 
tions that are true to life and have human 
interest appeal." 



New Baby Peggy Comedies 

First of Five Two-Reelers for May 11 
Release 

Universal Pictures, through new arrange- 
ments with Julius and Abe Stern of Century 
Comedies, will release five two-reel pictures 
in which Baby Peggy plays the star role. 
They are "Our Pet," "The Flower Girl," 
"Stepping Some," "Poor Kid" and "Jack and 
the Beanstalk." 

They are to be released every two weeks, 
starting May 11 with "Our Pet." These 
comedies have never been released and are 
reputed to be the best subjects Baby Peggy 
has appeared in for Century. They were 
made by Al Herman, Harry Edwards, Arvid 
Gillstrom and Noel Smith. 



His Fourth Exchange 

Arthur Bromberg, president of Progress 
Pictures, Inc., Atlanta, Ga., distributor of 
Arrow Film Corporation productions, U 
opening an office in Oklahoma City, Okla., 
in addition to his exchanges already well 
established in Atlanta, Charlotte, New Or- 
leans and Dallas. 

Brenon to Produce 
"Peter, Pan 99 



Herbert Brenon will produce "Peter 
Pan" for Paramount. This announce- 
ment was made recently by Jesse L. 
Lasky, first vice-president of Famous 
Players-Lasky Corporation, in charge of 
production. 

Mr. Brenor is now nearing the com- 
pletion of his current production, "The 
Mountebank," at the Paramount Long 
Island studio, following which he will go 
to the West Coast to direct the next 
Thomas Meighan picture, "The Alas- 
kan." As soon as the latter picture is 
finished, work will be started on "Peter 
Pan." 



May 3. 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 




Scenes from Warner Brothers' "Broadway After Dark," from the play by Owen Davis, 
featuring Anna Q. Nilsson, Adolphe Menjou and Carmel Myers. 

" When a Man 's a Man "Builds 
Many New Box-Office Records 

- 



Distinctive Election 



Henry M. Hobart, President, and 
Cornelius Miller, Secretary 

Henry M. Hobart was elected president 
of Distinctive Pictures Corporation at the 
annual meeting held April 22 in the offices at 
366 Madison avenue, New York. Mr. Ho- 
bart was one of the organizers of Distinctive 
and has been in charge of all production. 

Earlier in the day a meeting of Distinctive 
stockholders was held, at which Jefferson 
Seligman, of the banking firm of J. & W. 
Seligman & Co., was added to the board of 
directors. The board is now constituted as 
follows: Mr. Hobart, Charles S. Hervey, 
Winthrop Aldrich, Jefferson Seligman and 
Richard Whitney. 

Mr. Hervey was re-elected treasurer, 
Richard Whitney was named as assistant 
treasurer, and Cornelius H. Miller was 
elected secretary. Announcement of Dis- 
tinctive's future plans will be made in the 
next few weeks. 



Aronson Off on Trip 

Alexander Aronson, general manager of 
sales for Truart Film Corporation, left this 
week on an extended trip throughout the 
East and Middle West. While gone he will 
visit all exchanges handling Truart product, 
including those who hold the Truart fran- 
chise and the F. B. O. offices releasing these 
pictures. 




Scenes from the fourth comedy listed for 
release during April by Century, entitled 
"Pretty Plungers." 



ADDITIONAL reports from all over 
the country on Harold Bell Wright's 
"When a Man's a Man" further at- 
test to the popularity and box-office record- 
breaking proclivities of this First National 
release, produced by the Principal Pictures 
Corporation. Letters and telegrams from 
exhibitors whose theatres have created new 
box-office records with "When a Man's a 
Man" continue to pour into the First Na- 
tional offices. 

Following its opening at the Dome Thea- 
tre, Youngstown, Ohio, last week, the man- 
ager of that playhouse enthused over "When 
a Man's a Man" in the following telegram : 
"'When a Man's a Man' had splendid 
opening in Youngstown. Standing them up 



SAMUEL GOLDWYN'S prediction that 
the George Fitzmaurice production, 
"Cytherea — Goddess of Love," would 
be a censor-proof picture is now a fact. The 
New York Censor Board delegated their spe- 
cial women deputies to view this production 
and their report not only approved the film 
but praised the producer for his vision and 
foresight in presenting this beautiful love 
story with its moral, that no man or woman 
can break society's laws, and also praised 
George Fitzmaurice for his deft handling of 
the situations that made Joseph Hergeshi- 
mer's novel the sensation of 1922. 

When it was announced to the public five 
months ago that Samuel Goldwyn was to 
produce "Cytherea" a deluge of letters from 
well meaning people and critics poured in 
upon the producer, stating that the vital 
dramatic moments of "Cytherea" could not 
be picturized according to the present 
American standards and the ideals of the 
motion picture industry. It took more than 
courage and vision to plunge ahead after the 



from one-thirty on and equaling best house 
records. Eleven hundred capacity at forty 
cents top. Twelve hundred net." 

Robert Marsden, Jr., of the Coos Bay 
Amusement Company, following the pres- 
entation at the Noble Theatre, Marshficld, 
Oregon, wrote the following letter : 

" 'When A Man's A Man' played to a re- 
cord-breaking business for three days. As 
a rule a picture will not stand up three days 
in this town, but 'When A Man's A Man' 
proved to be the real knockout of the sea- 
son. 

"Our patrons were delighted with the pic- 
ture and have asked - 'When are you going 
to get another picture as good as 'When A 
Man's A Man.'" 



total of these letters reached 2,000, but both 
Samuel Goldwyn and George Fitzmaurice 
pitted their faith and experience against 
these sincere letter writers. 

"Cytherea," as now passed by the New 
York Censor Board, will be marketed by 
the First National exchanges. 

The production will be released simultane- 
ously in sixty different cities during Love 
Week, which has been so named by Mr. 
Goldwyn, celebrating the peak of the love 
season, May 4th to May 11th, the week 
when legend states Cytherea, Venus and 
Aphrodite, the love goddesses of the white 
race, have their open season. 



Letters from England 

"Top-notchcrs for consistent merit" is the 
verdict that has been accorded the Warner 
Bros. Classics of the Screen by the exhibi- 
tors of England, according to letters reach- 
ing the Warner home office, via their Eng- 
lish distributing organization, the Film Book- 
ing Offices. 



Cytherea " Passed by N. Y. 

Censors in Its Entirety 



44 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 




Dissolution Demanded 



Scene from "Fools in the Dark," a forthcoming F. B. O. release, starring Matt Moore 

and Patsy Ruth Miller. 



New York Critics Enthuse Over 
"A Boy of Flanders " 



AFTER giving his admirers a taste of 
his art in the patrician role of a 
prince in "Long Live the King," his 
first Metro picture, Jackie Coogan restored 
to his rags and poverty, has made the hit of 
his career in his second Metro picture, "A 
Boy of Flanders." This is the unanimous 
opinion of the New York critics following 
the Eastern premiere of "A Boy of Flan- 
ders" last week at the Rialto Theatre on 
Broadway, New York. 

"Little Jackie Coogan makes another big 
hit in his new picture, 'A Boy of Flanders' 
at the Rialto this week," wrote the critic 
of the Post. "To our way of thinking, it's 
the best picture he's ever been in. An in- 
teresting and heart-touching story. How 
the kids will love Jackie and his dog, 
Petrasche. The part fits the young star like 
a glove, and his remarkable talents enable 
him to make the most of it." 

The World was equally enthusiastic. 
"Some day," wrote the World critic, "in a 
score of years or so when Jackie Coogan is 
experienced enough and mature enough to 
be expertly critical he will be able to look 
back on 'A Boy of Flanders' and say here's 
a corking fine piece of work." 

" A Boy of Flanders' in our estimation is 
the finest thing Jackie ever did," wrote 
Harriette Underhill in the Herald Tribune. 
"The child really gives a remarkable per- 
formance and we know quite well that the 
reason we like him better than we ever did 
before is because Jackie has at last grown 
into his genius." 

The critic of the Times wrote that " 'A 
Boy of Flanders' with that clever mite 
(Jackie) makes quite a charming picture. 
The scenic effects are beautiful and the 
Dutch atmosphere is entrancing; there are 
old windmills, barges moving slowly through 
narrow waterways and fascinating Dutch 
costumes. It has plenty to interest adults." 

Louella O. Parsons wrote in the Ameri- 
can : " A Boy of Flanders' will delight the 
Jackie Coogan admirers and all the world 
knows that these are legion. We have only 



one Jackie Coogan in motion pictures. 
Jackie's supporting cast is all that it should 
be and Teddy his dog shows almost enough 
human intelligence to get his name in elec- 
tric lights. There are very pretentious sets 
and great care has been taken in the di- 
rection and production." 



Trade Commission Acts Against Three 
Eastman Laboratories 

A formal order, calling upon the Eastman 
Kodak Company to discontinue the use of 
"unfair methods of competition" to insure 
the preservation of its alleged monopoly in 
the sale of raw stock in this country, was 
issued by the Federal Trade Commission on 
April 12. It demands the dissolution of three 
laboratories, the Paragon and Sen Jacq of 
Fort Lee, N. J., and the G. M. on Long 
Island. The company^ will appeal to the 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals for 
a review of the decision. James S. Havens, 
its attorney, says that the company did not 
build but bought the laboratories in ques- 
tion from a corporation of which Jules 
Brulatour, Eastman distributor, was an offi- 
cer, and that they have been used only for 
experimental purposes. He claims that the 
company never was engaged previously in 
printing film from original negatives, for 
which the three laboratories are equipped, 
but in the manufacture of raw stock. 

Following a preliminary investigation, a 
formal complaint was issued last year against 
the company, George A. Eastman, Brulatour 
and the Allied Laboratories Association, Inc., 
and its members, the Burton Holmes Lec- 
tures, Inc., Chicago; Palisades Film Labora- 
tories, Inc., Palisades, N. J.; Lyman H. 
Howe Film Company, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; 
Mark Dintenfass, operating as the National 
Film Laboratories, Hudson Heights, N. J.; 
the Craftsmen Film Laboratory, Inc.; Kineto 
Company; Cromlow Film Laboratories, Inc.; 
Claremont Film Laboratory, Inc., etc. 



New "Our Gang" Film Heads 
Pathe's Releases for May 4 



PATHE schedule of release for May 
4 is headed by a new "Our Gang""' of- 
fering, titled "Commencement Day." 
Joe's performance on the saxophone, 
Mickey's rendition on the violin, and Mary's 
recitation of the well-known verse of the 
"little lamb with fleece as white as snow," 
which blunders unexpectedly into "The Light 
Brigade," are a few of the highlights of this 
comedy offering. 

The Grantland Rice "Sportlights" for 
Pathe which will be available on May 4, is 
tilled "Sporting Speed." It is a camera 
record of the various types of competition 
in which speed is sought, often at extreme 
risk to life and limb. 

"Publicity Pays," starring Charles Chase, 
is the amusing story of a would-be actress of 
amateur ability but decidedly professional 
aspirations. Beath Darlington, Eddie Baker 
and Noah Young appear in the supporting 
cast. 

In chapter seven of "Leatherstocking," 
titled "Rivenoak's Revenge," Hurry Harry 
betrays Leatherstocking into the hands of 
the hostile Indians. Deprived of their leader, 
the little group in Muskrat Castle are con- 
fronted with fresh perils as to the encroach- 
ing Delawares from the outside and the 
traitorous Hurry Harry in their midst plot 
their undoing. 



The current Aesop Film Fable, titled 
"Homeless Pups," proves that even the 
lordly dog catcher is not immune from re- 
prisals when his canine victims apply the 
motto of "In union there is strength." 

Pathe Review No. 18 includes views of 
the Cave of the Winds in Colorado under 
the caption, "Boy Pirates"; "The Everyday 
Orient," an intimate glimpse of life in Shang- 
hai; "Curled for Comfort," a pictorial study 
of the manufacture of upholstery and "Al- 
satian Days," a Pathecolor presentation. 

Topics of the Day No. 18, and Pathe News 
editions, Nos. 38 and 39, complete the Pathe 
schedule of releases for May 4. 



Lloyd Picks Players 

All the principal cast members have been 
selected for Harold Lloyd's second independ- 
ent production now under way at the Holly- 
wood Studios, according to word received 
from the Pathe home office this week. 
Jobyna Ralston will again appear opposite 
the star. Charles Stevenson will be seen as 
Lloyd's brother-in-law. Another prominent 
cast member is Josephine Crowell, who was 
recently seen as Catherine De Medici in 
Norma Talmadge's "Ashes of Vengeance'' 
and in Richard Walton Tully's "Flowing 
Gold." 



May 3, 1924 MOVING PICTURE 



WORLD 



45 




Scenes from Vitagraph's "Between Friends" 



N. Y. Rights to Features 

Starring Hutchison Sold 



Hall Back With Feature 



"The Shadow of the Mosque" Proves 
Popular in England 

Walter Richard Hall, well known in 
American producing circles, is back in New 
York with a storehouse of valuable infor- 
mation on the outlook for German film pro- 
duction. Mr. Hall has been at work for a 
long period on the Continent and brings 
with him the negative of "The Shadow of 
the Mosque," a feature production with a 
.cast headed by Stuart Rome and Mary 
Odette. 

"The Shadow of the Mosque" has al- 
ready been shown to the trade in England 
and early reports on bookings are most en- 
couraging. 

Mr. Hall is making plans for further pro- 
duction abroad, being most enthusiastic re- 
garding the possibilities when the resources 
of the foreign film makers are linked to 
casts employing a few American names and 
stories that will appeal in the big market 
here. — 

Start Work on Third 



Production Begun on the Final 
Kirkwood-Lee Picture 

Advices from the coast state that work 
will be started this week on the third and 
final picture in the series of Lila Lee-James 
Kirkwood pictures for Hodkinson release. 

The co-stars have already appeared in 
"Love's Whirlpool" and "Wandering Hus- 
bands" and the third and last of the series 
will be "Another Man's Wife" from the 
story by Elliott Clawson. 

The production will be made under the 
direction of Bruce Mitchell who directed the 
stars in the first picture of the series and 
all of the principal roles in the supporting 
cast will be filled by players of stellar rank. 

While no release date had been announced 
for 'Another Man's Wife" it will probably 
go to the exhibitors early in September. 



To Support Miss Dean 

Priscilla Dean in "The Siren of Seville" 
will be supported by Stuart Holmes playing 
the "heavy" while Alan Forrest who ap- 
peared with Mary Pickford in "Dorothy 
Vernon of Hadden Hall" will be seen in 
the leading role opposite the star. 

Work on the picture is now under way 
at the Thomas H. I nee studio under the di- 
rection of Jerome Storm with Hunt Strom- 
berg supervising the production. 



Miss Compson Due East 

Having finished work on the James Cruze 
picture, Betty Compson is now on her way 
from Los Angeles to Miami, Florida, to be- 
gin work on her second Tilford production 
for release through the Hodkinson Corpora- 
tion. 

The vehicle selected for this second Hod- 
kinson release is an adaptation of Hulbert 
Footner^s. popular novel, ^'Ramshackle 
House,'" published by the Doran Company. 

Board Praises Film 

Clarence Brown, Universal director, has 
just received notice from the National Board 
of Review that "The Signal Tower," Univer- 
sal Super-Jewel production, which he direct- 
ed has been placed on the board's roll of 
honor as a high-class picture "for the whole 
family.' 



S\M ZIERLER of Commonwealth Film 
Corporation has bought the Greater 
New York and Northern New Jersey 
rights from William Steiner for the series 
of six thrill features which Charles Hutchi- 
son, the dare-devil stunt performer, is mak- 
ing on the West Coast. The first feature, 
"Surging Seas," has been completed and is 
set for early release. These features will be 
released one a month. 

"Hutch" Hutchison heretofore has been 
featured in serials and scored an exceptional 
success in them as an heroic character un- 
daunted by any peril. His new feature pic- 
tures are expected to surpass the success of 
his serials, as, besides the customary quota 



SHOWN in advance of its official re- 
lease date fifteen times in fifteen dif- 
ferent theatres, "When a Girl Loves," 
Victor Hugo Halperin's latest production for 
Associated Exhibitors distribution, may be 
described literally as an audience tested pic- 
ture. The showings were in all classes of 
towns. 

Careful note was made of the effect of 
each succeeding episode in the picture on 
every audience, and when the time came to 
cut the film to the length desired the Hal- 
perin staff was influenced by the majority 
judgment of these several gatherings. 

Edward R. Halperin prepared a chart 
showing exactly how the fifteen audiences 
reacted to the most important scenes in the 
production. Always he made his first nota- 
tion immediately after the main title sheet 
was displayed, and when audiences invari- 
ably betrayed wonder and satisfaction with 
the strength and prominence of the cast. 

Mr. Halperin's chart is regarded by the 
producer as a particularly satisfying doc- 



of real thrills, they will have the added in- 
terest of a love theme. They are heralded 
as elaborately staged, with striking scenic 
effects, and are not to be confused with 
western pictures in any way. They are 
thrill dramas, according to Mr. Steiner, and 
will prove more than satisfactory entertain- 
ment for young and old alike. 

Besides the star, the cast of "Surging 
Seas" includes such capable players as 
George Hackathorne, Edith Thornton, David 
Torrence and Earl Metcalfe. Louis Weadock 
titled the picture. 

William Steiner of New York is handling 
this series exclusively. Other "features" 
starring Hutchison, now being released, are, 
it is said, either over two years old or are 
reissues of serials made before Hutchison's 
last two years with Ideal of London. 



ument, in that it presents the composite 
opinion of the fifteen different audiences. 



Exhibitors Take Note! 
Charles Hutchinson 

(HUTCH of Serial Fame) 

warns the M. P. T. O. that form- 
er serials are being re-issued as 
five-reel features. 

Don't Confuse these with My 
Series of Six Features NOW in 
the making in America and be- 
ing released ONLY through 

WM. STEINER 

NEW YORK CITY 



Associated Tests Its Latest 
Picture Before 15 Audiences 



46 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 





Scenes from the Goldwyn Production, "Recoil." 



Goldwyn Film Scores Big Hit 

at Showing at the Capitol 



GOLDWYN'S film version of Owen 
Davis' stage melodrama, "Nellie, the 
Beautiful Cloak Model," has scored 
one of the biggest hits of the year in New 
York, where it is now showing at the Capi- 
tol Theatre. Not only did the public and 
the critics find the story thrillingly suspen- 
sive, but also filled with comedy and humor. 
The reviews of the New York engagement 
were even more flattering than those of the 
Los Angeles showing of a week or two ago. 

Louella O. Parsons, in the New York 
"American," said : "I got a terrible kick out 
of seeing Nellie tied on the elevated tracks 
with the 'L' train thundering down upon her. 
I also found Lew Cody the last word in 
villains. 'Nellie, the Beautiful Cloak Model' 
is a melodrama of the first water. Claire 
Windsor is just as beautiful as Owen Davis 
described her in the original play and has 
everything happen to her that any heroine 
in any novel ever had. Emmett Flynn, the 
director, does very well for himself and the 
Goldwyn Company." 

Aileen St. John Brenon, in the "Tele- 
graph" : "The screen has certainly done 
right by our Nell ! 'Nellie, the Beautiful 
Cloak Model' has all the laughs and thrills 
of the ten-twenty-thirty and, best of all, is 
played just that way. There is a real thrill 
in the train wreck and the audience shrieks 
with delight. The cast is just what it should 
be." 

Harriette Underhill in the "Herald- 
Tribune" : "There is a perfectly grand pic- 
ture at the Capitol Theatre called 'Nellie, 
the Beautiful Cloak Model. . . .If we were 
you, we should not miss it for anything." 

Don Allen in the "Evening World" : "An 
out-and-out melodrama. If you like frank 
melodrama go up and call on Nellie." 



"Evening Post" : "A real movie. After 
all, the purpose of a movie is to entertain, 
isn't it? 'Nellie' gives you seventy-two min- 
utes of fast action, thrills, human interest 
stuff and laughs — lots of laughs — and if that 
isn't a good movie there never was one 
made." 



T ITH all of us becoming more and 
V/Y/ more interested in the study of 
™ ™ business conditions as effected by 
money, crops, industry, and so forth, I won- 
der whether in the very study of these things 
we do not cut paths of thought which take 
too much for granted," comments E. A. 
Eschmann, First National's general manager 
of distribution. 

"In my opinion all of us who distribute 
pictures should early in the year agree to re- 
lease a minimum number of big pictures and 
in that way aid and assist the exhibitor in 
giving fight to the summer fall-off in at- 
tendance. This may not be a specific for 
the ill, but it should prove an auxiliary at 
best and would build up the morale of all 
of our selling organizations. 

"It is almost an impossibility for any one 
sales manager to produce the right condi- 
tion of mind throughout his field force if all 
others, or the greater number of all other 
distributors are counteracting his efforts in 
that direction by continuing to release 'just 
pictures' during the summer. 

"We in this industry cannot combat sum- 



Arrow's S. R. O. Feature 

The Arrow-Blazed Trail special feature. 
"Lost in a Big City," starring John Lowell 
and featuring Jane Thomas and Baby Ivy 
Ward, opened at the Alhambra Theatre, 
Reading, Pa., on April 7 with the personal 
appearance of Mr. Lowell and Baby Ward. 
Beginning the first night, there was a long 
line-up in the street which on Tuesday and 
Wednesday nights, in spite of the rain, was 
just as lengthy. 



Released Abroad in May 

Fox announces the following special pro- 
ductions to be released during May in for- 
eign countries : Argentina, "The Eleventh 
Hour,'' "Monna Vanna"; Brazil, "If Winter 
Comes," "The Eleventh Hour," "St. Elmo"; 
Cuba, "Cameo Kirby," "The Shepherd 
King" ; Mexico, "The Temple of Venus," 
"North of the Yukon," "The Shepherd 
King"; Australia, "The Eleventh Hour," 
"North of the Yukon"; England, "St. Elmo"; 
New Zealand, "Cameo Kirby," "The Net." 



Select Brand Name 

"Eight Perfection Specials" is the brand 
name which the C. B. C. Film Sales Corpo- 
ration have decided to give their forthcom- 
ing series of eight special pictures, accord- 
ing to a recent report from the company. 
Eva Novak and William Fairbanks will co- 
star in these productions. 



Warners Acquire 2 More 

Warner Brothers have secured film right* 
to "The Eleventh Virgin," by Dorothy Day, 
and "Eve's Lover," by Mrs. W. K. Clifford," 
according to an announcement from their 
home offices. Both are recent publications. 



Kenneth Joins Universal 

Charles F. Kenneth, well known film sales- 
man in the New York and Northern New- 
Jersey territory, has joined the Big "U" sales 
staff and will cover the Essex County, N. J., 
zone. 



mer slump with 'just pictures.' Let's agree 
upon a set joint policy toward the better- 
ment of returns at the box office. It can 

be done." 



Phil Rosen With Warners 

Phil Rosen has been engaged by Warner 
Bros, to direct "Being Respectable" — the 
Grace Flandrau novel which is to be the 
next picture to start production on their lot. 



To Direct Viola Dana 

Lloyd Ingraham has been engaged to di- 
rect Viola Dana in her next Metro starring 
picture, "The Beauty Prize," a Saturday 
Evening Post story by Nina Wilcox Putnam. 
Winifred Dunn is now preparing the adapta- 
tion. 



Announce Distribution 

It is now definitely announced that the 
Lee-Bradford Corp. will distribute Norman 
Dawn's "Lure of the Yukon." 



Combat Summer Slump with 
Good Pictures, Urges Eschmann 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



German Organization Produces, 
Imports and Exhibits Pictures 



Estelle Taylor Made 
Star by DeMille 

Cecil DeMille announced recently that 
he has signed Miss Taylor on a long- 
term contract to replace Leatrice Joy as 
the principal feminine featured player in 
his forthcoming productions. 

Miss Taylor has risen from com- 
parative obscurity in less than four years. 
A native of Wilmington, Del., she fol- 
lowed a few months on the stage with 
immediate success in such pictures as 
"While New York Sleeps," "Blind 
Wives," "Bavu" and "A Fool There Was." 
She is now working for Paramount in 
Geo. Melford's production, "Tiger Love." 



Registers at Grauman's 



Schulberg's "Poisoned Paradise" Held 
Over in Los Angeles 

' B. P. Schulberg's newest Gasnier produc- 
tion, "Poisoned Paradise" just released by 
Preferred Pictures Corporation, created a 
favorable impression at Grauman's Rialto 
Theatre in Los Angeles where it opened last 
week. Originally booked for seven days, it 
will be held over for at least two or three 
weeks longer, according to an announcement 
from the management. 

The Los Angeles Record said: "Here is a 
romantic kaleidoscope. Many characters — 
quaint, crafty, sympathetic — sliding and fall- 
ing, into new patterns like the colored glass 
of the children's optical toy. Interesting; at 
moments fascinating. That's 'Poisoned Para- 
dise.' " 

The Los Angeles Express wrote : " 'Poi- 
soned Paradise' is interesting. The cast is 
composed of well known players and they 
give a good account of themselves. Clara 
Bow is an excellent choice. Kenneth Harlan 
plays with a nice distinction of light and 
shade. Carmel Myers is again a siren. Her 
beauty and grace fit her admirably for these 
roles." 

C. B. C.'s Biggest Deal 



Sells Entire 1923-24 Output to DeLuxe 
Film Company 

The C. B. C. Film Sales Corporation an- 
nounces the consummation of what it terms 
"the biggest deal in the history of the or- 
ganization" with the De Luxe Film Com- 
pany of Philadelphia. The proposition in- 
cludes sixteen special feature productions, 
which will be the largest number of feature 
pictures C. B. C. shall have produced in one 
year. 

Oscar Neufeld and Tony Luchese made a 
special trip to New York last week to nego- 
tiate the sale with C. B. C. Joe Brandt, who 
had been away for several weeks, came back 
sooner than he had planned in order to 
meet the heads of the De Luxe exchange. 

The sixteen pictures include the "8 Co- 
lumbias" and the "8 Perfection Specials." 



Titled "Riders Up" 

"Riders Up" has been selected as the per- 
manent title for "When Johnny Comes 
Marching Home," recently completed at Uni- 
versal City under the direction of Irving 
Cummings, and featuring an all-star cast 
lieaded by Creighton Hale and Ethel Shan- 
non. 



THE TERRA FILM AKTIEN- 
GESELLSCHAFT together with the 
affiliated companies, Terra Film- 
verleih, the Terra Glauhaus and the Terra 
Haus consists of production plants, "copy- 
ing plants," export, import, distributing and 
leasing organizations. The head offices are 
located in the Terra Haus, a large building 
in the best business quarter of Berlin, which 
is owned by the company. In 1914 this 
house was estimated at 15,000,000 gold 
marks. 

The company owns extensive studios. 
On the grounds besides the studios are 
numerous sheds and small buildings in which 
painting workshops, smithy, joinery, copying 
plant and decorations are located. The 
studios have at their disposal large trans- 
formers and separate boilers, a great number 
of trunk lights, side lamps and portable 
lamps, as well as up-to-date searchlights, in- 
cluding the smallest and largest marine 
searchlights, separate lighting apparatus so 
as to be independent of the electric works, a 
large magazine of interior decorations, pillars, 
staircases, arches, doors, etc., in all styles, 
furniture, properties, costumes, etc. The 
studios also are placed at the disposal of 
other concerns and are let all the year 
round. The studios represent nearly 1,000,- 
000,000 gold marks in value. 

The company has installed a separate de- 
partment for leasing purposes which owns 
many branches, especially in Germany, and 
is admirably organized. This organization has 
separtae offices in Breslau, Dantzig, Duessel- 
dorf, Frankfort, Hamburg, Koenigsburg, 
Liepsig, Munich, Saarbrucken and Hagen. 
The sales department supplies about 3,700 
cinemas in Germany and at present trans- 
acts business to the amount of about 4,500,- 
000 gold marks per year. The leasing depart- 
ment of the Terra lets the company's own 
productions, such as "Hanneles Himmel- 
fahrt,'' "Der Mann mit dear Eisernen 
Maske," "Figaro's Hochzeit," "Christian 
Wahnschaffe," and productions of other com- 
panies, as well as the best American pictures, 
such as the First National pictures, "My Boy" 
and "Circus Days,'' some of Jackie Coogan's, 
"The Isle of Lost Ships," Mary Pickford re- 



leases, Larry Semon and Jimmy Aubrey 
comedies and the best English productions. 

The productions of the Terra organization 
in Germany are shown in the Mozartsaal in 
Berlin (1,800 seats), the Schumann (4,000 
seats), in Frankfort, the Residence Theatre 
(1,300 seats) in Duesseldorf, the Agrippina 
Theatre (1,000 seats) in Cologne, the 
Koenigspavillion (1,000 seats), in Leipsig and 
the Princess Theatre (1,000 seats) in Dres- 
den, among other houses. 

The Terra owns well organized distributing 
offices in nearly all the countries of the con- 
tinent. These now are about to be extended 
by offices in Vienna, Prague, Bale, Amster- 
dam and Milan. 



Has London Premiere 

A representative group of British exhibit- 
ors turned out last week on the occasion of 
the first English trade showing of the Ernst 
Lubitsch production, "The Marriage Circle." 
The showing was held at the Alhambra Thea- 
tre, London under the direction of the Gau- 
mont Company of London, who have secured 
British rights to this picture from Warner 
Brothers. 



Burr Completes Feature 

C. C. Burr has completed this week, at the 
Glendale Studio, the final scenes for the new 
independent market feature, "Lend Me Y.our 
Husband," after seven weeks of production, 
under the direction of William Christy 
Cabanne Marguerite Gove wrote the story 
direct for the screen and Raymond S. Har- 
ris prepared the continuity. 



Autographed Photos! 

Baroness Patricia de Grandcourt, who will 
conduct "The Stars' Souvenir Booth" this 
year at the Park Avenue Street Fair, an 
event in Manhattan by society for charity, 
requests that motion picture and theatrical 
stars donate autographed photographs of 
themselves. These will constitute the most 
important part of her salable articles during 
the bazaar. 




Exterior of the Terra Studio in Berlin 



48 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Says State Rights Productions 
Are Becoming More Powerful 



THAT states rights productions are be- 
coming more and more of a power in 
the motion picture industry was the 
opinion voiced this week by Irving M. Les- 
ser, vice-president and general manager of 
distribution for Principal Pictures Corpora- 
tion. 

"Each day brings a steady improvement 
in the states rights system," said Mr. Lesser. 
"And it is noticeable now that among the 
states righters a movement is growing to 
give the producer as even a break as he 
gets from one of the national releasing or- 
ganizations. 

"Our company has already found the 
states rights system an excellent sales 
medium. At present we have five states 
rights productions in which we have placed 
quality above everything else. We have 
liberally advertised these productions as we 
want to let the public know about them." 

The five states rights productions which 
Principal Pictures Corporation now has ready 
for release bear out Mr. Lesser in his ideas 
as to quality and other features. 

"Daring Youth," presented by B. F. Zeid- 
man, stars Bebe Daniels, supported by such 
prominent players as Norman Kerry, Lee 
Moran, Lillian Langdon and Arthur Hoyt. 
William Beaudine directed. 

"Listen Lester," produced and presented 
by Sacramento Pictures Corporation, is an 
adaptation of John Cort's famous stage suc- 
cess that ran for two years on Broadway. 

"The Masked Dancer," produced and pre- 
sented by Eastern Productions, Inc., stars 
Helene Chadwick and Lowell Sherman. Bur- 
ton King directed and the supporting cast in- 
cluding Leslie Austen, Joseph King, Arthur 
Housman, Charles Craig, Mme. Andree, 
Dorothy Kingdon, Alyce Mills and Helene 
Ward. 

"Daughters of Pleasure," produced and 
presented by B. F. Zeidman, stars Marie 
Prevost and Monte Blue, supported by 
Clara Bow, Wilfred Lucas and Edyth Chap- 
man. It presents a love story, dealing with 



Kathleen Clifford in 
Christie Comedy 



Kathleen Clifford will don make-up at 
The Christi Studio this week, adding on* 
more famous name to the line-up which 
the comedy organization is announcing 
in its current releases of two-reel come- 
dies released through Educational Film 
Exchanges. 

Miss Clifford will do a special two- 
reel comedy novelty, in which she will 
play a character similar to that which 
she did with wonderful success on the 
stage both in this country and abroad. 
Gil Pratt will direct Miss Clifford in her 
first short comedy offering. The title 
of the story is "Grandpa's Girl," and it 
gives the actress an opportunity to ap- 
pear both as a boy and as a girl in the 
picture. 



modern social conditions and the "idle rich," 
and was directed by William Beaudine. 

"The Good Bad Boy," also presented by B. 
F. Zeidman, features Joe Butterworth and 
Mary Jane Irving. Brownie, the remarkable 
dog, also appears. It was directed by Eddie 
Cline, who directed Jackie Coogan in "Cir- 
cus Days." 



Gets Real Atmosphere 

J. Stuart Blackton in his forthcoming 
production of a picturization of a novel by 
E. Phillips Oppenheim of life in the film 
colony at Hollywood obtained permission to 
use the Club Petroushka for sequences in 
this picture. The Club Petroushka is the 
most popular inn in Los Angeles. 




Mix in "The Trouble Shooter," his 
latest production for Fox. 



Eight Associated Exhibitors 

Releases for April and May 



EIGHT pictures, to be released in late 
April and May, compose the formid- 
able schedule announced by Associated 
Exhibitors this week. It is the most exten- 
sive program ever drawn up by this organi- 
zation for so brief a period, and comprises 
a collection of offerings regarded by Asso- 
ciated officials as notable for their high qual- 
ity as well as numbers. 

Persons who have had previews of "Rac- 
ing Luck" in California, including newspaper 
reviewers, declare that in this picture Monty 
Banks, who is featured, rises to new heights 
as a comedian. Jean Havez and Lex Neal 
are the authors of the story. Helen Fergu- 
son, Francis J. McDonald and Lionel Bel- 
more are in the cast, and Herman C. Ray- 
maker directed. 

"The Spitfire," an adaptation of Frederic 
Arnold Kummer's famous novel, "Plaster 
Saints," may almost be called an exhibitor- 
selected photoplay, details of the production 
plans and even the main title having been 
selected after Murray W. Garsson had car- 
ried on a referendum among 12,000 showmen. 
Betty Blythe, Lowell Sherman, Elliott Dex- 
ter, Pauline Garon, Robert Warwick and 
Burr Mcintosh are the principals and the 
production was directed by William Christy 
Cabanne. "Plaster Saints" was published 
first as a serial in Hearst's Magazine, then 
in book form and again serialized in a coun- 
trywide chain of newspapers. 

"The Chechahcos" was filmed in Alaska 
and is said to present marvelous exteriors. 
The story has to do with the memorable 
Alaskan gold rush of 1897. Its author was 
Lewis H. Moomaw, who also directed. "The 
Chechahcos," which is in eight reels, was 
produced by Captain Austin E. Lathrop and 
includes in its cast Howard Webster, Eva 
Gordon, Alexis B. Luce, Gladys Johnston, 
William Dills and Albert Van Antwerp. 

Wallace Beery is featured in "Unseen 
Hands," a moving drama presented by W. C. 
Graves, Jr., and which was directed by 
Jacques Jacquard. The cast also includes 
Joseph Dowling, Fontaine La Rue, Jack 



Rollins and Cleo Madison. The action is 
laid in the Indian settlements in the Far 
West. 

William Faversham is the most noted 
player in "The Sixth Commandment," a Wil- 
liam Christy Cabanne production, but in 
the cast also are such well known and popu- 
lar actors as Charlotte Walker, Edmund 
Breese, John Bohn, Kathleen Martyn, J. 
Neil Hamilton, Charles Emmett Mack and 
Coit Albertson. This is described as a pow- 
erful drama. The story is by Arthur Hoerl. 

"Why Get Married?" with the French 
beauty, Andree Lafayette, in the principal 
role, already has attracted a large amount 
of favorable attention. It discusses the 
question whether a woman can succeed in 
business and as a house-wife at the same 
time and pictures two young couples in 
their first year of wedded life. Helen Fergu- 
son, Jack Perrin, William H. Turner, Max 
Constant, Edward B. Tilton, Bernard Ran- 
dall and Orpha Alba also are in the cast. 

"When a Girl Loves,"' with story, pro- 
duction all by Victor Hugo Halperin, is the 
most ambitious of the Halperin attractions 
and is declared to be easily his best. This is 
an audience-tested picture, no fewer than 
fifteen different audiences in as many theatres 
having viewed and approved it prior to its 
official release. In important roles are Ag- 
nes Ayres, Percy Marmount, Kathlyn Wil- 
liams, Robert McKim, George Siegmann, 
John George, Leon White, Rosa Rosanova, 
Otto Lederer, Inez Seabury, William Orla- 
mond and Mary Alden. 

"The Lone Wolf," featuring Dorothy Dal- 
ton and Jack Holt, is based on Louis Joseph 
Vance's best-seller of the same name and 
is a thrill drama. An exciting airplane bat- 
tle is one of the high-lights. In support of 
the principals are Wilton Lackaye, Char- 
lotte Walker, William Burroughs, Robert 
T. H aines, Tyrone Power, Gustave von 
Seyffertitz, Paul McAllister, Alphone Ethier, 
Lucy Fox, William Tooker and Edouard 
Durant. This is an S. E. V. Taylor produc- 
tion. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



49 



npaign on "Why Men Leave Hon 
Is Scoring Bulls-eyes in Test Run 



(tTTTHY MEN LEAVE HOME," the 
\\ J° hn M - Stahl-Louis B. Mayer 
* » production for First National, is 
going through its test run period with a 
double-barreled campaign that is scoring 
bulls-eyes. There are twelve units in the 
campaign, half of which were devised by 
Lin Bonner and the other half by Charles R. 
Condon and Bert Lennon, of the Mayer 
West Coast organization. Bonner has made 
his approach almost entirely from the stand- 
point of a practical newspaperman, he hav- 
ing been in the game a great many years and 
recently with the New York American and 
New York World. The West Coast contribu- 
tion to the campaign is more spectacular. 
Taking the units in order, they are: 
A SOCIAL WELFARE STORY — This Is a 
straight newspaper proposition. Inspired by 
a statement recently given out by Leonard 
McGee, of the New York Legal Aid Society. 
In conjunction with announcement of his 
annual report, Mr. McGee discussed why men 
leave home, abandoning wives and families. 
The story was good enough to get a seven- 
column headline in the New York American 
and received good display In the other 
dailies. Bonner followed this up, got a copy 
of the McGee statement and is sending It 
out to exhibitors, suggesting that they get 
a local authority to issue a similar story 
about three weeks before play date. This is 
a legitimate news story anywhere, but the 
trick is to get the Judge, District Attorney 
or whoever gives it out to mention the pic- 
ture title. 

NEWSPAPER COMIC STRIP — This is not 
new, but it is not every picture that lends 
itself to this treatment as ideally as "Why 
Men Leave Home." There are eighteen sub- 
jects in the series and they are so well done 
they are on a par with most of the standard 
strips for which newspapers pay big money. 
Mats and stereos are supplied free to any 
newspaper or exhibitor desiring to use them. 

NEWSPAPER SYMPOSIUM — This is a col- 
lection of statements by big people, such as 
Judge Ben Lindsey, the Rev. John Roach 
Straton and Magistrate Jean Norris, of the 
New York Domestic Relations Court, dis- 
cussing marital problems, desertion, etc. 
This, too, is splendidly prepared, and Is free 
to newspapers in mat form, with headings. 
The idea is to establish the "Why Men Leave 
Home" column as a permanent feature of 
newspapers, inviting letters from readers 
dealing with the subject. Both these units, 
like the social welfare story, are legitimate 
news features and carry no taint of adver- 
tising or publicity, even though they do put 
over the title of the picture. 

GUIDE TO HAPPY MARRIED LIFE — This 
Is a little leaflet printed on four sides. The 
front cover carries the caption, "Guide to 
Happy Married Life — "Practical suggestions 
by" the Marriage License Clerk. In New 
York, City Clerk Michael J. Cruise stood as 
the author, the first time he ever lent him- 



self to an advertising proposition. The two 
inside pages carry don'ts for wives and 
don'ts for husbands. The back page carries 
the picture title, cast and play date. These 
leaflets can be printed for $1 per thousand 
or less, so that 10,000 should not cost the 
exhibitor more than $10. They can be dis- 
tributed as advance heralds, via mailing lists, 
through the marriage license bureau and in 
co-operation with stores. 

RADIO OR CHURCH DISCUSSION— The 
theme of "Why Men Leave Home" is all In 
favor of domestic peace and good will, with 
a lot of sly comedy fitted In. A friendly 
preacher could be induced to deliver an ad- 
dress on "Why Men Leave Home," with 
eradication of domestic discord as the ob- 
ject, or a divorce judge could be asked to 
deliver a talk on the subject via radio, fit- 
ting In, perhaps, on some newspaper's pro- 
gram. 

HUSBANDS' PROCLAMATION TACK -UP — 
Printed cards about the size of window 
oards, to be tacked up overnight and sprung 
on the public as a mystery. They are to be 
prepared as follows: 

PROCLAMATION 

We, the undersigned, serve notice upon all 
wives and brides-elect as follows: 

They must not nag their husbands. 

They must not Interfere with post-gradu- 
ate poker studies. 

They must avoid millinery mania. 

They must not consider snoring a vice. 

They must not trick husbands into heart 
and purse breaking shopping trips. 

They must feed their own pets. 

They must not turn pickpocket in search 
of money or other incriminating evidence. 

They must not forget breakfast is a table 
function, not a bedroom rite. 

They must not trump husbands' tricks in 
a bridge game. 

These and other causes explain why men 
leave home and this notice is issued in the 
interest of domestic peace and public policy. 
(Signed) DOWNTRODDEN HUSBANDS. 

This, it will be seen, carries no tip-off that 
it is a picture stunt, not even the title be- 
ing capped. But, if it is tacked up a day or 
so before your first advance announcement 
of the picture, It cannot fail to register. 
These tack-ups can be printed in any job 
shop at a cost not exceeding $10 or $15 per 
thousand. 

STORE AND WINDOW TIE-UPS — This 
title is made to order for almost every kind 
of a store tie-up, from stockings to auto- 
mobiles. In Los Angeles, the Mayer people 
got tieups with scores of drug stores and, 
through the Heinz agency, landed hundreds 
of grocers with a display of Heinz Food 
Products and a card reading: "The.re are 
many reasons 'Why Men Leave Home,' but 
Heinz knows 67 why they don't." For a 
florist tleup, the picture itself provides a 
card, one title reading: "Husbands, don't 
wait until your wives are dead to send them 
flowers — Do it Now!" All the exhibitor has 
to do there is to add the words: "and take 
her to see 'Why Mean Leave Home." " 

A TRAFFIC-HALTING STUNT — In Los An- 



geles, arrangements were made with the 
Hellman Bank, one of the biggest on the 
Coast, to send an armored car to Loew's 
State Monday morning. Huge coin sacks, 
loaded under police guard and filled with 
rocks, were put inside and theatre attaches 
spread the word that the sacks contained 
record-breaking Sunday receipts for "Why 
Men Leave Home." The bank had prepared, 
in advance, for a window' display In its main 
building and 30 branches, with a card read- 
ing: "Safety First. All box-office records 
broken at Loew's State by 'Why Mean Leave 
Home.' Bringing receipts to Hellman's, the 
Bank of Service." 

AMBULANCE BALLYHOO— Another unique 
idea in the Los Angeles campaign. A white 
ambulance was hired and sent whirling to 
prominent spots, where it would stand for 
the crowd to see banners on its sides read- 
ing: "He laughed until it hurt. So will you 
when you see Why Men Leave Home' at 
Loew's State now." 

THROWAWAYS, POSTCARDS, LAUNDRY 
INSERTS — A police traffic card was dupli- 
cated, with the summons reading to Loew's 
State to see "Why Men Leave Home." These, 
with police consent, were dropped into every 
parked auto. You could use this with one 
side reading: "This GRIEF CARD may not 
be new to you, but 'Why Men Leave Home* 
is. Come to the Theatre next week pre- 
pared to put up bail of cents, including 

war tax, and enjoy an evening free of trou- 
ble." 

THE U. S. NAVAL AND MILITARY TIE- 
UP — This was effected by means of one- 
sheet stands, supplied by the exploiters, 
reading: 

You May Be Puzzled 
"WHY MEN LEAVE HOME" 

But Uncle Sam isn't. 
He knows many red-blooded 
men who wish to travel 
and seek adventure leave 
home to JOIN THE NAVY. 
PRETTIEST ANKLE CONTEST — This was 
a chancy stunt, put on in such clean and 
dignified fashion that it turned out to be 
one of the most successful of all the work 
done for the picture. A big dance place was 
"sold" the idea of the contest and liked It 
so well it made it a big feature, advertising 
it in the dailies. For a week they had a 
special velvet drape across the front of their 
special stage, with a huge arrow running 
diagonally from the upper left corner to- 
wards the lower right and pointing towards 
a raised part of the curtain, where a pair 
of "prop" legs stood exposed. The picture 
title was the length of the arrow and two 
circular posters announced the contest and 
date. On the night of the judging a circu- 
lar curtain enclosing the stage was raised 
to a height slightly below the knee of the 
average girl. Then a score of girls whose 
names were not revealed passed in review 
before a board of judges. 

A LITTLE POETRY — A booklet, illustrated, 
with women's limbs and containing a dozen 
pages, presented in rhyme reasons why men 
leave home. 




First National Release 



Three Examples of Los Angeles Exploitation of "Why Men Leave Home." 



50 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Big War Invention Like One that 
Furnishes Plot for "Lone Wolf" 



JUST two weeks after the official release 
of "The Lone Wolf," the Associated 
Exhibitors feature in which Dorothy 
Dalton and Jack Holt are starred, news has 
been cabled from London of the perfection, 
by a British scientist, of an amazing war in- 
vention exactly like the one which furnishes 
the whole plot for the picture. 

The opening scene of "The Lone Wolf" 
gives a glimpse of the Washington office of 
the special investigator of new inventions 
for the Department of State. "They are 
ready for the airplane tests, sir," a subordi- 
nate reports to the chief officer. Then fol- 
lows the descriptive sub-title : "Since the 
new wireless apparatus mr.y really prevent 
the explosion of gas in motors — as its in- 
ventors claim — all plans except these photo- 
graphic negatives have been destroyed. The 
United States hopes to make the invention 
a great force for peace, but does not forget 
that with it a dishonest nation might win 
an unjust war." 

"Ready?" asks the operator. A nod is 
given and the engine-killing ray comes into 
action. An airplane careens to earth from 
high in the heavens — its motor robbed of 
power. "It killed my engine — dead,'' ex- 
claims the pilot, reporting to the investiga- 
tor. "I believe you could bring me down 
with that thing if you were a mile under- 
ground." 

The newspapers announced recently the 
actual perfection of just such an invention. 
The New York World printed over its cable 
dispatch the heading, "Briton Demonstrates 
Ray to Kill from Long Distance. Can Crash 
Airplanes in Flight, Mow Down Armies, In- 
ventor Insists." Under a London date-line, 
Arthur E. Mann, staff correspondent, cabled : 

"This afternoon I saw an apparently suc- 
cessful laboratory demonstration here of a 
deadly electrical war invention, with which 
the inventor expects to be able to bring 
down airplanes in flight, to send airships 
crashing to the ground in flames, mow down 
armies, put machine guns out of action, ex- 
plode magazines and ammunition dumps, and 
put automobiles out of service — all from a 



long distance from the scene of action. The 
discoverer of this revolutionary invention is 
H. Grindell-Matthews. His latest invention, 
he told me, might be described as 'a ray 
that kills. " 

The original story of "The Lone Wolf 
was by Louis Joseph Vance, and was one 
of that popular novelist's best sellers. It 
developed a search in many countries for 
international crooks. In the pictured ver- 
sion, S. E. V. Taylor, the director, injected 
the idea of an invention to bring down air- 
planes from a great height by killing the 
motor. In the picture the secret of the in- 
vention is stolen from the Washington State 
Department and the quest for the criminals 
takes the secret service operatives to a num- 
ber of European capitals. 



Dempsey Starts Work 

Heavyweight Champion in 10 Two- 
Reel Universal Specials 

Jack Dempsey, world's champion heavy- 
weight, has gone to work for Universal. 
Studio work has started at Universal City 
on the series of ten two-reel special pictures 
which Universal is to make with Jack as 
star. 

Jess Robbins, the director assigned to the 
Dempsey unit, is marshalling his cast and is 
supervising Jack in a preliminary course of 
training for pictures. Actual shooting of 
the first picture, "The Title Holder," will 
begin in a few days. The stories for the 
ten two-reelers were written by Gerald 
Beaumont. Scott Darling is scenarizing the 
Dempsey stories. 

At the head of the supporting players is 
Hayden Stevenson. Esther Ralston has been 
selected as Jack Dempsey's leading woman. 
Miss Ralston is one of the Wampas Baby 
Stars of 1923. "Chuck" Reisner has been 
selected as the "heavy" for the Dempsey 
pictures. He and Jack will mix it in the 
ring for the two-reeler series. 



Big 1924-25 Warner Schedule 
Underway to a Flying Start 



SOME of the titles already selected by 
Warner Bros., and which will be put 
into early production for the 1924-25 
group, are : "The Age of Innocence," by 
Edith Wharton; "The Dark Swan," by 
Ernst Pascal; "The Lighthouse by the Sea," 
by Owen Davis ; "The Eleventh Virgin,'' by 
Dorothy Day; "Eve's Lover," by Mrs. W. K. 
Clifford; "Deburau," the Belasco production 
by Sacha Guitry; "The Lost Lady," by 
Willar Cather; "My Wife and I," by Har- 
riet B. Stowe; "The Narrow Street,'' by Ed- 
win Bateman Morris, and "The Dear Pre- 
tender," by Alice Ross Colver. 

Some of the directors engaged for work 
on pictures are Ernest Lubitsch, Harry 
Beaumont, William Beaudine, Monta Bell, 
Millard Webb and James Flood. 

Last week Harry Warner left for the 
coast. Before departing, he made the fol- 
lowing statement : 



"It looks like another big Warner year. 
We are not making empty boasts about 
what we intend to do, for we have past ac- 
complishments of the recent year to back 
us up. For the last three years we have 
been making wonderful strides; by now we 
have our second wind. We promise exhib- 
itors some of the greatest box-office bets of 
film history. We spared nothing in money 
or time to put out fine pictures last year. 
They went over big — even bigger than we 
had anticipated. We mean, therefore, to 
follow the same policy for the coming 
season." 



Apex Buys "Stranger" 

"The Stranger from the North" has been 
bought by Apex Film Co. of Pittsburgh for 
Western Pennsylvania and Western Virginia 
territory. The Lee-Bradford Corp., are re- 
leasing "The Stranger from the North." 




Scenes from Pathe's "Publicity Pay«," a one-reel comedy starring Charles Chase. 




EXHIBITORS' NEWS AND VIEWS 



EDITED BY SUMNER SMITH 



Massachusetts Man Climbed to 
Prominence in Thirteen Years 



Max Simmons is to build a theatre, hall 
and store building at Pleasant nad Emory 
streets in Attleboro. 



Upon receiving the decision of the Mas- 
sachusetts State Supreme Court, restrain- 
ing Marcus Loew, New York theatrical 
magnate, from operating theatres in Mas- 
sachusetts cities where Elias Marcus Loew 
of Lynn has houses, the latter Mr. Loew or- 
dered huge electric signs bearing the words 
"E. M. Loew" for all of his theatres. The 
decision, as reported in full in the last issue 
of Moving Picture World, marks the end 
of two years of legal battling and sustains 
the decision of the lower court which was 
handed down on May 17, 1923. 

Elias M. Loew came to the United States 
about thirteen years ago and became a 
waiter in Charles Wirth's famous beer gar- 
den and restaurant in Boston. After he 
had acquired a sum of money by scrupu- 
lous saving he bought the Dreamland the- 
atre in Lynn, which was rated as anything 
but a money-maker. He turned it into a 
successful enterprise soon after taking it 
over. 

The Lynn Loew and Marcus Loew came 
from the same section of Galicia, it was 
learned during the trial of the suit of Mar- 
cus Loew to restrain Elias M. Loew from 
operating a theatre in Roxbury under the 
name of E. M. Loew's Theatre. 

Elias Loew now owns theatres in Massa- 
chusetts, Connecticut and Maine and has 
plans for the purchase of several other the- 
atres in the New England states. 

According to the ruling of the Massa- 
chusetts court, the Lynn Loew is barred 
from using his name over theatres in cities 
where there are houses under the name of 
the New York Loew, and the latter cannot 
use his name over theatres where Elias 
Loew has theatres. 



Nathan Gordon, president of the Olympia 
Theatres, Inc., of New England, will open 
his newest theatre, named Gordon's Fields 
Corner Theatre, on Easter Monday. It is 
located at Fields Corner, at the junction of 
Dorchester street and Adams street in Dor- 
chester. The theatre has been constructed 
in accordance with the latest designs in the- 
atrical buildings and is reported to be one 
of the most magnificent in the east. In ac- 
cordance with Mr. Gordon's film policy the 
new theatre will present the latest photo- 
play releases. 



Samuel and Nathan Goldstein, directing 
heads of the Goldstein Brothers circuit of 
theatres, have invited President Coolidge to 
be present at the opening of their new Cal- 
vin Theatre in Northampton, named in honor 
of the Chief Executive, on Thursday night, 
April 17. "Fair Week" has been selected 
as the opening film feature. 



Business at the film theatres in Boston 
during Holy Week remained in about the 
usual condition, with no unusual spurts nor 
drops. "Under the Red Robe" at the Park 
Theatre closed Sunday, April 20, and the 
"last week's" notice has appeared in the 
newspaper advertisments for "America." 
Meanwhile "The Ten Commandments" is in 
its second month. "After Six Days," which 
opened day and date with "Ten Command- 
ments," closed April 19. 

Despite the closings, however, Boston 
promises to still be flooded with motion pic- 
tures. On May 5 "Thief of Bagdad" will 
open at the Colonial Theatre, a regular le- 



gitimate house. "Dorothy Vernon of Had- 
don Hall" followed "Under the Red Robe" 
into the Park Theatre, opening Easter Mon- 
day. "Beau Brummel" was featured during 
Easter week at the Modern and Beacon the- 
atres. "Hunchback of Notre Dame" was the 
feature at Loew's State during Easter week, 
a second run showing. 



Easter week was royally celebrated by 
Abraham Goodside in his Capitol Theatre in 
Springfield when twelve dancers from a local 
dancing school and an orchestra of ten mu- 
sicians and a number of solo dancers were 
added to the program, which had as the 
film feature "Name the Man." It was one 
of the most ambitious programs ever pre- 
sented in a Springfield picture theatre. 



The Kiwanis Club of New Bedford is 
bringing "Rosy" Rothnfcl and bis Capitol 
Theatre radio artists to the Olympia Theatre 
for two performances on April 24. It is re- 
ported that the Rothafel "gang" is to re- 
ceive $5,000. The Fall River Kiwanis club 
is doing the same thing. The admission will 
be $1.25 to $2 at the matinee and $2 to $3 
at night. manager Earle D. Wilson of the 
Olympia is breaking into his regular pro- 
gram to allow the entertainment. 



A Baby Peggy resemblance contest was 
staged successfully by John W. Hawkins, 
general manager of Allen Theatres, in the 
State Theatre in New Bedford during the 
showing of "The Law Forbids." The odd 
part of it was that Mr. Hawkins didn't have 
to go to the newspaper office to get publicity 
from the contest. The mother brought the 
second prize winner into the news room 
with a request that her child's picture be 
printed. This was agreed to and then it 
became necessary for the news editor to 
hunt up the first prize winner so that her 
picture also could be printed with winner 
No. 2. A news item also was given with 
the names of the winners. 



Joshua A. Aston of Maiden, who a few 
years ago became the assistant manager of 
the Strand Theatre in Maiden, died April l(i 
at the age of 69. 



Manager Clarence E. Robbins of the Mark 
Strand Theatre in Worcester got some extra 
publicity for the Strand in one of the daily 
papers by giving tickets for the boys who 
are enrolled in a marble tournament. "The 
Third Alarm" was one of the pictures booked 
especially for the children's show the morn- 
ing of April 19. 



Manager Ed Foley of the Academy Theatre 
in Haverhill is a consistent exploitationist 
and his displays are of an original nature. 
They never fail to register a hit with his 
box office and account in a large measure 
for his success with all sorts of pictures. 



There was heard in New Bedford before 
a master a petition of George W. Allen, Jr., 
president and treasurer of Allen Theatres, 
a circuit of eight picture theatres, against 
Simon Besorosky, which is an action to have 
the court find that Besorosky, as the owner 
of the property in which is located Allen's 
Theatre, must renew a lease of the theatre 
property to Mr. Allen. The theatre owner 
on November 18, 1918, leased the property 
from Charles A. Galligan. Since that time 
the property has been purchased by Mr. 
Besorosky and he is asked to renew the 
lease in accordance with the terms of re- 
newal in the original lease. Mr. Besorosky 
claims there has been a breach in the terms 
of the lease and he has declined a renewal. 



The Weld-On Amusement Company of 
New Bedford has been granted incorpora- 
tion papers and will engage in a general 
amusement business. The capital is given 
as $50,000. The incorporators are: Edward 
Daniel Davenport and Charles Edward Dav- 
enport of Fairhaven and Omer Alexander 
LeDoux and Ethel Corinne LeDoux of New 
Bedford. 



Manager Clarence E. Robbins of the Mark 
Strand Theatre in Worcester had a revival 
week for the seven days starting April 13, 
presenting a complete new show each day. 
A feature of the programs was the playing 
of a sacred fantasy by the Strand Orchestra. 



Daniel F. Regan, formerly manager of a 
North Adams theatre, died at his home in 
Pittsfield, on April 5, following a brief ill- 
ness of pneumonia. He was 51 years old. 
Mr. Regan retired from the theatrical busi- 
ness three years ago. He is survived by his 
wife and one daughter. 



Laurence Stuart, managing director of 
the Paramount-Fenway Theatre in Boston, 
was obliged to take his hands off the "pilot 
wheel" for four days because of an illness, 
but returned reporting himself as all re- 
covered. 



Stern Heads Omaha 

The Hodkinson Corporation announced 
this week that Herman Stern former Uni- 
versal manager at Dcs Moines has been ap- 
pointed managed of the Hodkinson branch 
at Omaha replacing Jack Flannery who had 
resigned. 



Released January 7, 1924 — Now Booking 




GLENN HUNTER 

"GRIT" 

w,iR 

Clara Bow. Osgood Perkins 
Dore Davidson 

iJI'ilm Cm i Id Production 



Vmnrn <n HODKINSON 




52 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 





Scenes from the William Fox production, "The Man Who Came Back.' 



Two Louisville Theatres Turn 
from Pictures to Vaudeville 



Indications are that there may shortly be 
room in Louisville for additional downtown 
picture theatres as a result of two of the 
largest present picture houses going to 
vaudeville. The Strand, which was built as 
a stage attraction house and which through 
long years has apparently proven successful 
only as a picture house, has arranged to 
start vaudeville on the Pantages circuit, 
using pictures along with vaudeville attrac- 
tions. Manager Fred Dolle, of the Fourth 
Street Amusement Co., reported that plans 
are for three shows a day during the week, 
with four shows on Saturdays and Sundays. 

B. F. Keith's Mary Anderson Theatre, 
which has been running pictures for a 
couple of years and which was formerly the 
leading vaudeville house of Louisville, has 
returned to vaudeville, although it is under- 
stood that the change is only temporary in 
its nature, as the Rialto will become the 
vaudeville house in the fall. The Mary An- 
derson has a relatively small seating capac- 
ity, and after the Keith interests secured the 
National, a much larger and newer house, 
the Mary Anderson has been used princi- 
pally as a picture house, but with short 
periods of vaudeville from time to time, but 
almost always with pictures as well. 

Among other local changes the Gayety 
Theatre, operating heretofore on a burlesque 
wheel, has started using six-reel features, 
along with musical comedy and short vaude- 
ville stuff, and has started off with the best 
business that the house has known so far. 



Business, which has been relatively dull 
over the past several weeks, because of bad 
weather, opened up during the first few 
days of April, and with fine weather since 
that time the downtown theatres have been 
jammed to capacity, especially with their 
Saturday and Sunday shows. In fact, the 
largest crowds seen around the theatres in 
months were jamming the lobbies while 
awaiting admission on the evening of 
April 13. 



The Kentucky General Assembly wound up 
its session on March 19 without passing any 
of the several legislative bills which would 
have affected theatres, amusements, etc., one 
of the bills calling for an amusement tax, 
another for censorship, another to prohibit 
motor driven projecting machines. 



Texas 

The City Amusement Company, San An- 
tonio, Texas, has incorporated with a capital 
stock of $8,000. The incorporators are : J. 
Zalmanzig, David Cottliet and A. C. Jonas, 
all of San Antonio. 



J. A. Lempke will erect a new theatre at 
Waco, Texas, in the near future. 



The Wewoka Picture Show Company is re- 
modeling a building on Main and Wewoka 
avenues, Wewoka, Okla., and will open a 
new movie theatre in the near future. 



At Macauley's Theatre, a summer stock 
company, headed by Malcolm Fasset, who 
has played stock at that house for the past 
two summers, opened its season on April 8. 



H. Smithey is remodeling a building at 
Hammon, Okla., which will be turned into a 
picture theatre. 



The Alamo, Walnut and Kentucky thea- 
tres are continuing their bills as usual, and 
no changes have been announced in the bills 
of the Majestic, or with the smaller down- 
town houses. The suburban houses are re- 
porting nothing of interest. 



L. E. Brewer of Dunca, Okla., has pur- 
chased the Criterion Theatre at El Reno, 
Okla., from Shuttee and Cole. 



J. G. Genson has purchased the Victory 
and Hamley theatres at Pauls Valley, Okla., 
from Art Hamley. 



Released February 14, 1924 — Now Booking 

itman Dennett ftesems 




Cincinnati 



Homer Guy, manager of the Apollo The- 
atre, Xenia, Ohio, has been generously do- 
nating the use of film for special exhibi- 
tions which have been given throughout the 
winter for the children at the Ohio Soldiers' 
and Sailors' Home in that city. 



Manager Charles Wuerz, of Loew's, Day- 
ton, Ohio, which recently changed from 
vaudeville to pictures, has inaugurated a 
practice of serving water to the patrons dur- 
ing the intermission. The service is handled 
by uniformed girls. 



Manager Frank Murphy, of the Murphy 
Theatre, Wilmington, Ohio, has given the 
use of his theatre to the fire laddies of that 
city for a two day benefit showing of "The 
Midnight Alarm," to be screened early in 
May. 



The Pleasurette, an Andover, Ohio, pic- 
ture house, which has been dark for sev- 
eral months, has been remodeled and re- 
opened by Mrs. Lillian Anderson, who will 
personally manage it. 



The Adam* Theatre :il Toledo, Ohio, haa 
become history, and the building which the 
theatre occupied will be razed to make wax 
for a new structure to be devoted to other 
commercial enterprises. John Kumler, 
owner of the tdiinu, niKo controls the Prfs- 
cilia and Pantheon theatres at Toledo. 



The building of three new theatres for 
Steubenville, Ohio, has been announced. The 
Tri-State Amusement Company has awarded 
a contract for a movie house, and another 
for a combination legitimate and picture 
theatre, while George Shaffer, Wheeling, W. 
Va., theatrical promoter, is about to begin 
work on a vaudeville and picture house. 



Keith's, Columbus, Ohio, which it was re- 
ported would probably adopt a summer pol- 
icy of pictures, will be given over to a dra- 
matic stock company, according to the latest 
announcement. 



Frank Savage postcards from Youngstown, 
Ohio, that he is about to assume the man- 
agement of the Victory and Mahoning thea- 
tres in that city. 



J. K. Peters has resigned as receiver of 
the Grand Theatre at Lorain, Ohio, and 
Walter Watts has been appointed to suc- 
ceed him. 



The Washington Theatre, Toronto, Ohio, 
was formally opened during April. It is said 
to be one of the most complete small houses 
in Eastern Ohio, costing $75,000. 



Manager Jules Frankel, of Gifts Theatre. 
Cincinnati, announces his summer scale of 
admission prices of 30 cents for the entire 
house, the regular season admissions hav- 
ing been 50 cents. "The White Sin" is the 
first picture to be shown under the new 
schedule. 



May 3, 1924 MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

Schenectady Picture Theatre 
Buys $3,500 Rain Insurance 



For the first time in this territory, a pic- 
ture theatre has taken out a rain insurance 
policy to protect itself from loss through 
weather conditions. In connection with a 
week's run of "The Marriage Circle," open- 
ing at the Barcli Theatre in Schenectady on 
April 19, R. V. Erk of Ilion, owner of the 
house, through Frank Breymaier, its man- 
ager, insured himself against loss of patron- 
age by rain to the extent of $3,500. Under 
the provisions of the policy, Mr. Erk will 
receive $500 each day that it rains one-eighth 
of an inch between 4 and 8 o'clock during 
the seven days the picture is playing at his 
house. Mr. Erk became rather disgusted 
with weather conditions generally when it 
rained the entire week while he was show- 
ing "April Showers," while patronage fell off 
through exceptionally fine weather during 
the run of "Maytime." 



No wonder Oscar Perrin, of the Leland 
and the Clinton Square theatres in Albany, 
ranks as the most polite exhibitor in the 
whole territory. Aside from the fact that 
politeness is a part of Mr. Perrin's person- 
ality, his private office displays a card con- 
taining twelve rules for courtesy. And 
right at the end are these words: "Life is 
not so short but that there is always time 
for courtesy." 



William Shirley lias been obliged to re- 
duce admission prices at the State and Strand 
theatres in Seheneetady four weeks after he 
increased them. At the State, 25 and 40 
cents had prevailed up to a month or so ago, 
when Mr. Shirley increased these prices to 
35 and 50 cents, the Strand prices going 
from 25 to 35 cents up to 25 and 40 cents. 
After watching the slump that came in busi- 
ness, following the increase, Mr. Shirley de- 
cided to drop back to his former prices and 
at the same time remarked that he was more 
-convinced than ever that the movies were 
the poor and moderate man's form of amuse- 
ment, and that any attempt at higher prices 
simply served the purpose of driving them 
away. 



Peter Vaurakis has assumed the manage- 
ment of the Carthage Opera House, which 
will be given over to high class pictures. 
Mr. Vaurakis was associated with the 
Papayanakos brothers of Watertown for 
some time. 



About now, Miss Janet Noon, for seven or 
eight years owner of the Crescent Theatre 
In Schenectady, is enjoying the breezes from 
off the Pacific Ocean. Miss Noon recently 
disposed of her house and went to San 
Francisco. 



There is a report to the effect that William 
Berinstein, owning a chain of houses, is 
dickering these days for the Van Curler in 
Schenectady. There is also talk to the ef- 
fect that the Van Curler may run pictures 
following the end of the burlesque season. 



Gilmore and Pilkins of Syracuse, who 
opened the Astor in Troy recently, are 
branching out and have taken over the Al- 
pine and Gardner Hall In that city. They 
nave also opened the Pearl in Albany, with 
double features for a dime. 



There has been a report current to the 
■effect that the owners of the Orpheum in 
Amsterdam may acquire the Gem in Little 
Falls, a house owned by Mrs. McGraw. 



With a stiff fight centering between the 
State and the Barcli theatres in Schenectady, 
five big pictures are due to be shown in a 
single week in that city. The management 
•of the State also controls the Albany and 
the Strand. "Strongheart" will be shown at 
the Strand, "Sporting Youth" at the Albany, 
and "Shadows of Paris" at the State, in com- 
petition with "The Marriage Circle" at the 
Barcli, and "A Boy of Flanders" at Proc- 
tor's. Later on Mr. Shirley will use "Girl 
Shy" and "The Stranger" to buck R. V. Erk 



in a week's run of "The White Sister," which 
will be played to increased admission prices 
during the first week in May. 



William Farley, president and treasurer of 
the Farash Theatres, Inc., Is also interested 
in picture theatres in Yonkers. 



Michael Friedman, manager of the Albany 
Theatre in Schenectady, spent the week end 
in New York City. 



Maine 

Abraham Goodside will spend $30,000 in 
alterations to the Empire Theatre in Port- 
land. An addition of 40 feet will be placed 
on the auditorium and the building gener- 
ally will be rebuilt, additional exits opened 
and its seating capacity greatly increased. 
The Empire has an exclusive picture policy 
and is operated in conjunction with Mr. 
Goodside's other theatres, which are the 
Strand, also in Portland, and the Capitol 
and Bijou theatres in Springfield, Mass. 
Harlan J. Boucher is manager of the 
Empire. 



Manager William E. Reeves of Abraham 
Goodside's Strand Theatre in Portland is 
presenting "The Leatherstocking" series on 
Saturday afternoons only and is making a 
big bid for the patronage of children on the 
strength of the Cooper stories. 



Joseph Gagnon of the Music Hall Theatre 
in Lewiston, Me., met Ben Turpin and wit- 
nessed the miraculous recovery of her hear- 
ing by Mrs. Turpin at Ste. Anne de Beaupre, 
Canada, recently. Mr. Gagnon has just re- 
turned to Lewiston after a week's vacation. 

Mr. Gagnon said that Mrs. Turpin was 
seated two rows in front of him in the 
Church of Ste. Anne, and that after praying 
she arose, quite able to hear again, because 
she had had "faith." 



Connecticut 

The starting day of the programs having 
been changed from Monday to Sunday and 
Saturday in some cities, it has remained for 
Allan C. Morrison of the Majestic Theatre 
in Hartford to start his new bills on Friday. 
On April 18 he began a seven days' run of 
"Sherlock, Jr.," and the following Friday 
began a nine days' showing of "A Boy of 
Flanders." He is billing his orchestra heav- 
ily for overtures and special music at the 
Sunday night shows. 



Charlie Benson still is at the helm of S. Z. 
Poli's Palace Theatre in Hartford and from 
all accounts he is not going to leave. After 
having directed the presentation of motion 
pictures, the best of 'em, all winter, he's 
going to have a respite from the screen for 
summer and for that reason now is busily 
engaged in preparing for a season of dra- 
matic stock. 



53 




THE LELAND, ALBANY, N. Y. 
Which will observe its 100th anniversary in 
May, 1925. It is owned by Buckley and 
Tarsches, and managed by Oscar Perrin. 



Buffalo 

Bill i e West, who has managed several 
local community theatres, and who of late 
has been enjoying his old love, the stage, is 
back in the exhibitorial business as manager 
of the Avon Theatre, an east side neighbor- 
hood house operated by Dewey Michaels. 



George Beban and company will be at the 
Lafayette Square next week in "The Great- 
est Love of All," two reels of which will be 
enacted on the stage by the same cast as 
seen in the picture. Manager Fred M. Shafer 
declares it is be the biggest attraction ever 
offered at this house. 



Peter Vournakis, operating the Strand 
Theatre in Phoenix, N. Y., is to take over 
the picture theatre in Herkimer, N. Y., ac- 
cording to announcement sent to the mem- 
bers of the Film Board of Trade of Buffalo. 



John Fennyvessy, Rochester exhibitor, was 
in Lockport, N. i .. the other day looking 
over the theatre situation with a view to 
learning if it was advisable to build a house 
in the Lock City. 



J. H. Michael, manager of the Regent The- 
atre, had a camera man in front of his house 
Easter Sunday at 2 p. m. to take movies of 
folks entering the house. His stunt was 
given wide publicity in the newspapers and 
a goodly crowd gathered. The films were 
shown on the Regent screen on Monday 
night. Next week, Mr. Michael will put on 
a local talent society show. Mr. Michael is 
chairman of the executive committee of the 
M. P. T. O. of N. Y., Inc., the convention of 
which, it is expected, will be held in Buf- 
falo this spring. 



It is reported that representatives of the 
Loew interests are still in Buffalo looking 
over the community theatre situation. 



Released February 17, 1924 — Now Booking 

0ARRYCAREY 

//, NIGHIHAWK 

AHunt Stromberg 
Production 

Vistribuicd by H0DKINS0N, 

Season 192*1925 Thirty first -Run Pictures 





54 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



New Exhibitor Organization 
Formed at Chicago Meeting 



A new exhibitor organization was formed 
here last week at a meeting held at the 
Congress Hotel and attended by exhibitors 
from Michigan, Minnesota, Kansas, Indiana, 
Illinois and Texas. Other states may join 
later. The purpose of the new organization 
is for united action on all matters of inter- 
est to the trade. 

W. A. Steffes of Minnesota was named 
chairman of the meeting and will act in that 
capacity until the next meeting, which will 
held about June 11. H. M. Richey was named 
secretary of the tentative organization. 
Among the men present were H. A. Cole of 
Texas, R. R. Biechele of Kansas, C. C. Rit- 
ter, Joseph Denniston, H. M. Richey of 
Michigan, Frank J. Rembusch and William 
Connors of Indiana, Al. Steffes of Minne- 
sota and Ludwig Siegel and Glenn Reynolds 
of Illinois. The name of the new organization 
will be the Allied State Organization of Mo- 
tion Picture Theatre Owners. 



Andrew Karzas of the Woodlawn Theatre 
Is spending- a few days at French Lick 
Springs and on his return plans a trip 
abroad. 



Robert J. Speck, owner of the Harmony 
Theatre, has added another house to his cir- 
cuit, taking over the Ewing Theatre on Ew- 
ing avenue last weeh. 



C. A. Mendenhall has sold the Star Theatre 
and will spend a few months on the West 
Coast enjoying a well earned vacation. 



The anti-Sunday movie show crusaders 
lost out in two live Illinois cities last week 
when Dixon and Pana voted in favor of Sun- 
day amusements. The largest vote ever cast 
in Dixon gave the Sunday show folks a ma- 
jority of 1,723 votes. 



Another woman manager is on the job, 
Mrs. E. Gibson has taken over the manage- 
ment of the Lyric at Monticello, 111., and will 
improve the house. 



Rex Lawhead now is manager of the 
Commercial Theatre of the Ascher circuit 
on the south side. 



Victor H. Geissler of Manitowoc now i9 
associated with "Happy" Meininger at the 
Calo Theatre as assistant manager. 



The Commodore Theatre at 3105 Irving 
Park Boulevard, one of the largest houses 
in that district, has been taken over by 
Isadore Gumbiner from Louis Zaller and 
Vernon Seaver. Mr. Zaller left for a short 
vacation on the West Coast and on his re- 
turn expects to open another house, while 
Mr. Seaver will announce his new connec- 
tions in the near future. 



Work has started on the new million dol- 
lar Rialto Square Theatre at Joliet, 111. 
Plans by Rapp & Rapp of this city call for 
a house seating 3,000 and of the most mod- 
ern construction. The main entrance of the 
house will be on Chicago street and there will 



be other entrances on Scott and Van Buren 
streets. The house will have a depth of 174 
feet and the main floor will seat 1,500, while 
the balcony will seat 805 with provision for 
expansion to 1.500 seats in the future. Ven- 
tilation will be by refrigeration and the 
structure will be of reinforced concrete and 
structural steel, with terra cotta face brick 
finish. 



Austin E. Lathrop, well known owner of 
theatres in Alaska, was in the city last week 
giving the houses and the trade the once- 
over. He operates the movie house at Fair- 
banks, Alask., the terminus of the govern- 
ment railroad in that country. 



J. J. Cooney has been made managing di- 
rector of the Stratford Theatre, taken over 
by the National Theatre Corporation, suc- 
ceeding Mrs. M. Henoch, who has retired. 
Several improvements will be made in the 
house and better picture and mnsical pro- 
grams will be engaged. Paul Sternberg and 
his orchestra of 28 musicians will he a per- 
manent feature. 



The new theatre to be built for Jones, Lin- 
ick & Schaefer on North Clark street will 
be named the Diversey Theatre, as It will 
be located at Diversey avenue and North 
Clark street. 



C. H. Foster has resigned as manager of the 
Lincoln Dixie Theatre at Chicago Heights, 
111., and has been succeeded by William Malli- 
son, who will continue the picture policy of 
the house. 



Frank Omich has been made house man- 
ager of the Crocker Theatre at Elgin, 111., 
since the house has been taken over by the 
Midwest management. He was formerly con- 
nected with the Fox Theatre at Aurora. 



Ralph Benedict has taken over the man- 
agement of the Globe Theatre at Champaign, 
111., the home of the University of Illinois, 
and will improve the house. 



Thomas J. Watson has taken over the man- 
agement of the Majestic Theatre at Elgin, 
111. He will continue to feature pictures. 



The Crystal Theatre was opened at Wat- 
seka. 111., last month and will play pic- 
tures exclusively. 



Ralph Kettering, publicity manager for 
Jones, Linlck & Schaefer, has organized the 
Kettering Productions Inc., with a capital 
stock of $30,000 and will begin operations 
about the middle of May. 



John J. Jones, of Jones. Linick & Schaefer, 
and Mrs. Jones are spending a few days at 
French Lick Springs. 



Eda Weinstein has taken over the Irving 
Theatre on South Halsted street. 



W. W. Halliday, well known to Flm Row. 
will manage the Grand and Mattoon theatres 
at Mattoon, 111., as both houses are now un- 
der one management. Mr. Halliday formerly 
handled the Grand in that city. 



Henry Mantredini has opened a picture 
theatre at Bush, 111. 



George Madison of the Kozy Theatre on 
South Clark street says that radio Is hurt- 
ing the business of the Loop theatres, the 
smaller houses feeling the effect more at 
the present time than the larger houses. 
He thinks this may change with the advent 
of warmer weather. He has found the short 
program of help in bringing up the busi- 
ness of his theatre on Thursday, as that 
has been an off day. 



Carson T. Metcalfe, in addition to running 
the Greenfield Theatre at Greenfield, 111., IB 
cashier of the First National Bank of that 
hustling little city. 



William F. O'Connell, manager of the 
Vernon Theatre on the South side, says that 
radio has hurt the attendance nbout fifteen 
per cent, in his neighborhood, and that with 
the advent of warmer weather nnd daylight 
■&ving it will be more than some neighbor- 
hood houses can do to get through the sum- 
mer months without closing. 



F. O. McNail will open an airdrome soon 
at Zeigler, 111., and will feature music with 
the picture programs. 



Samuel Horton, owner of the Majestic at 
Alvin, 111., will open another house soon in 
that city. 



The Royal Theatre at Palestine, III., has 
been sold to Hawkins and Sallsburg by Guy 
Waumple. 



Biggsville, 111., will have a new picture 
house under the management of M. Chur- 
chill, who plans to open in a few weeks. 



Harry Frank, formerly of Macomb, 111., 
is going back to that city and expects to 
reopen the Tokio Theatre, which has been 
closed for some time. He will show exclu- 
sive moving picture programs early in May. 



Canada 

A regular luncheon meeting of the Mov- 
ing Picture Theatre Owners of Canada, On- 
tario Branch, was called for April 29 at the 
King Edward Hotel, Toronto, to make final 
arrangements for the attendance of many 
Canadian exhibitor-members at the inter- 
national convention of the M. P. T. O. of 
America at Boston, Mass., May 27 to 29. 
Special railway facilities have been provided 
for the use of Canadian delegates to Boston, 
including special train fare. A report has 
been prepared by J. C. Brady, president of 
the Ontario branch of the M. P. T. O., and 
Harry Alexander, also of Toronto, another 
Ontario M. P. T. O. official, regarding asso- 
ciation convention details, which they gath- 
ered during a recent visit to M. P. T. O. 
headquarters in New York City. Mr. Brady is 
the owner of the Madison Theatre, Toronto, 
and Mr. Alexander has the Park Theatre, 
Toronto. 



E. Glassco has olTered the Empire Thea- 
tre, Windsor, Ontario, for sale or lease. The 
Elm pi re, which is one of the best known then- 
tres of Western Ontario, is fitted with mod- 
em equipment and has a pipe organ. Mr. 
(;iass<'oN address is <IT» Sandwich street, 
u imlsor. 



The Canadian premiere presentation of 
Mary Pickford's "Dorothy Vernon of Had- 
don Hall" will be conducted at the Grand 
Theatre, Toronto, one of the veteran down- 
town theatres of the Ontario Capital start- 
ing Monday. April 28. The engagement Is 
not limited. 



An unusual engagement in Toronto was 
the presentation of "The White Sister" at 
the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the leading 
legitimate house of Toronto, during the week 
of April 21, twice daily, as a special road 
show, top being $1.50 and all seast reserved. 
The Royal Alexandra Theatre is directed by 
Ix)l Solman. 



Released March 2, 1924— Now Booking 

m 




ED 



James Kkkwood 

LilaLee and 
Madge Bellamy 

Jpresented hyJlega/jPichtres <3nc. 
munbuicdm HODKINSON 

Sam Durty RretRunRdures 




May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



55 



California Showmen Discuss 
Posting Firemen in Theatres 



A meeting of the Allied Amusement In- 
dustries of Northern California was held at 
the headquarters of this organization, 100 
Golden Gate avenue, San Francisco, on the 
afternoon of April IS at which the proposi- 
tion of having a fireman stationed in all 
playhouses was discussed. Thirty-five mem- 
bers of the organization were present and 
the meeting developed into a frank discus- 
sion of the situation, which has been aired 
at length of late in the daily press. Fire 
Chief Murphy made a talk and was tendered 
a vote of confidence. 



Vic Dickerson, formerly manager of the 
Circle Theatre, Los Angeles, has been made 
house manager of the Fantages Theatre, San 
Francisco. 



Sol Pincus, formerly manager of the Im- 
perial Theatre, San Francisco, now is man- 
ager of the Tivoli Theatre, which is making 
a specialty of offering distinct novelties in 
screen attractions. 



William J. Citron, general manager of the 
Louis R. Greenfield Theatres, which operates 
four houses in San Francisco, one in Santa 
Cruz and another at Honolulu, has an- 
nounced the appointment of Eugene Perry 
as managing director of the Greenfield The- 
atres. At the same time he announced that 
a vigorous policy of expansion would be in- 
augurated. Eugene Perry is well known in 
this field, having been manager of the T. & 
IX Theatre, Oakland, and the States Theatre 
of that city. Since leaving the Greater San 
Francisco territory he has been in charge 
of the Famous Players group of theatres in 
Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. His immedi- 
ate plans call for popularizing the New Mis- 
sion and New Fillmore theatres, declared to 
be the two finest residential theatres in 
America. 



The Golden State Theatre and Realty Co. 
has been Incorporated at San Francisco with 
a capital stock of $1,000,000 by R. A. Mc- 
Neil, 10. H. Emmlck, M. Thomas and I,. S. 
Ha mm. 



Among the recent visitors on San Fran- 
cisco's Film Row have been James Woods, 
Redding; J. Williams, Grass Valley; T. Ky- 
pros, Santa Clara; H. Heber, of the Sequoia 
and Majestic theatres, Sacramento; Jules 
Smith, of the Butlet Theatre, Tonopah, Nev., 
and Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Menard, of the M. & 
M. Theatre, Sacramento. The latter were on 
their way to Los Angeles. 



J. Hoorwitz, who conducts the Hayward 
Theatre at Hayward, Cal., and the Best The- 
atre at San Leandro, announces that a $100,- 
000 picture theatre will be erected in the 
latter city on the site occupied by the Odd 
Fellows' Hall. 



Robert A. McNeil, of the T. & D. Jr. En- 
terprises, Inc., San Francisco, which con- 
trols forty picture houses In the Northern 
California field, and J. R. Saul, theatre 
broker, with Mrs. McNeil and Mrs. Saul, 
sailed from this port on the Pacific Mail 
liner President Pierce on April 15, for a 
five weeks' visit to the Hawaiian Islands. 



J. W. Allender, owner of the Casino, Spo- 
kane, launched the biggest advertising cam- 
paign of the kind ever attempted in that 
city in connection with the showings of 
"Three Weeks." In addition to a heavy 
newspaper campaign and various tieups, he 
used forty 24-sheets, 100 6-sheets and 100 3- 
sheets. 



Three Washington Exhibitors 
Control Centralia and Chehalis 



F. A. Graham, of the Grand Theatre, Cen- 
tralia, Wash., A. F. Cormier and E. T. Rob- 
inson, of the Liberty and Rialto, Centralia, 
and the magnificent new St. Helens, Che- 
halis, which will open this month, and R. L. 
Ruggles of the Liberty and Dream, Chehalis, 
have incorporated, giving them control of 
the twin cities — Centralia and Chehalis. It 
is reported that Mr. Graham will handle the 
bookings for all the houses. 



The beautiful Mack Theatre, built some 
time ago for Mack J. Davis in Port Angeles, 
Wash., is reported to have been purchased 
recently by Jensen and Von Herberg. 



A $60,000 picture theatre is scheduled for 
early construction at Longview, Wash., ac- 
cording to report. Mr. Greenland is named 
as interested in the project. 



A reported consolidation of a number of 
suburban houses in Portland states that the 
interests have been pooled and a profit-shar- 
ing basis established. Buying of film will 
probably be done by one man. Complete de- 
tails were not available, but houses and 
managers mentioned with a fair average of 
accuracy from a number of different sources 
were: W. E. Graeper, with the Tivoli and 
Union Avenue; Bob White, with his new Bob 
White Theatre; Edward Fautz's Echo Thea- 
tre, Stephen Parker's Alhambrn, W. E. Tib- 
bitts' Highway, G. O. Garrison's Laurelhurst, 
Phillips' Gay, and McCreedy's Multnomah. 



Fire of undetermined origin, which started 
in the basement of the Grand Theatre, Cen- 
tralia, Wash., early in the morning of April 
15, caused $10,000 damage, which was con- 
fined to the rear of the theatre. Frank 
Graham, manager, and his wife and daugh- 
ter, who have sleeping quarters in the build- 
ing, were forced to flee to escape suffocation. 



Pittsburgh 

M. F. Tyson, son of Samuel Tyson, for- 
merly at the Universal Theatre at Universal, 
has purchased the Jewel Theatre Building 
and property on Spring Garden avenue, 
North Side, Pittsburgh, from Julius Orline. 
The Jewel seats 275 and is already under the 
operation of the new owner. 

Maurice Baum, owner of the Nittany The- 
atre, State College, was a recent visitor to 
the Pittsburgh Film Row. He brought along 
the usual smile, and said that business was 
just "middlin.' " 



Mark Browar of the Kenyon Theatre on 
the North Side, Pittsburgh, announces that 
the house will be closed on June 1 for re- 
modeling and enlarging. When completed 
by September 1, the capacity will be 2,000 
persons, double the present number of seats. 
Mark says that the Kenyon will be second 
to none of the finest theatres In the terri- 
tory. 



J. C. Duff of the Liberty Theatre, Mason- 
town, drove to town one day recently in his 
new Lincoln coupe. And say, maybe that 
Isn't some car. It was the cynosure of all 
eyes on Film Row. Theodore Mlkalowsky, 
owner of the Rex in the same town, was also 
a recent visitor. 



Frank L. Farman of the Cameo Theatre, 
Butler, was a recent visitor to Film Row, 
as were also Ike and Jake Silverman of the 
Strand, Altoona. 



Mr. Klelnsmith, owner of the Imperial 
Theatre at New Kensington, has changed 
the policy of his house from combination to 
straight pictures, and is booking all the 
big ones. 



G. B. Meyers of the Gem Theatre, Derry, 
is sporting some real class in the form of 
a blue Packard single-six sedan. 



W. G. Maute opened his new 800-seat 
Maute Theatre at Irwin on April 21, and the 
house is one of the finest for its size to be 
found anywhere. Several of the local film 
exchangemen attended the opening. Maute 
also owns the Grand in the same town. 



W. P. McCartney, whose newest theatre, 
the Ritz, at Indiana, was opened three weeks 
ago, was in town a few days ago and stated 
that standing room only has been the rule 
at this beautiful new house. The Ritz seats 
1,300. 



New Ohio Theatre 

A motion picture theatre is under con- 
struction at the corner of West Broad 
street and Oakley avenue in the beautiful 
west end section of Columbus, Ohio. The 
new theatre will have a seating capacity of 
1,000, all on one floor. The interior of the 
theatre and the lobby will be artistically 
decorated ; it will be one of the most at- 
tractive suburban theatres in central Ohio. 
This theatre will be owned by William N. 
Petrakis and Anthony J. Nelson, and man- 
aged by Theodore J. Pekras. 



A report states that Ed D. Dolan of Aber- 
deen, Wash., has taken over the house at 
Cosmopolis. Mr. Dolan Is a partner in Rip- 
ley & Dolan, who are about ready to open 
their big modern playhouse and picture the- 
atre in Aberdeen, which has been under con- 
struction for several months. 



Released March 9, 1924— Now Booking 

SAMUEL V. GRAND presents 

BRYANT 
WASHBURN 

BILLIE DOVE in 



William Hartford, new manager of the 
Portola Theatre, West Seattle, has been ob- 
serving "Clean Up and Paint Up Week" by 
spending over $1,000 on tinting, decorating, 
new carpets, drapes and new loge seats. 
Work has been accomplished without clos- 
ing the house. 




TRY AND 
GET IT* 




HODKINSON 
RELEASE 



Season 1924-1925 
Thirty First-Run Pictures 



56 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



St. Louis 



Milwaukee Theatre Rivalry 

Is Aired in the Newspapers 



Intense rivalry between the Saxe inter- 
ests and those in control of the Alhambra 
and Garden theatres in Milwaukee, which 
had its inception when the Saxes were 
forced to vacate the Alhambra several years 
ago because they could not obtain a renewal 
of their lease, has cropped out in new form. 

Although no names are mentioned, an ad- 
vertisement run in the Milwaukee news- 
papers by Leo A. Landau, director of the 
Alhambra and Garden, is regarded by those 
in touch with the theatrical situation as a 
direct thrust at the Saxe interests, who re- 
cently opened the Wisconsin, largest picture 
theatre in the city. 

The ad, headed "No Strings Tied to These 
Two Theatres," and signed "Alhambra and 
Garden management," follows: 

"No film company has any interest in them 
or any contracts for all of its films. These 
two theatres pick from all film companies 
solely on a merit basis. The name of the 
producer cuts no ice. The picture itself 
must be up to standard — a standard deter- 
mined not by any one person, but a very 
critical committee who reviews them. It is 
this system of doing business that brought 
to the Alhambra and Garden 'Over the Hill,' 
•Robin Hood,' 'Huchback of Notre Dame,' 
'White Sister,' 'Scaramouche,' 'If Winter 
Comes.' It is this method that assures you 
the best plays, always, at the Alhambra and 
Garden. You never take the chance of dis- 
appointment by attending these two thea- 
tres." 

The Saxes at the Wisconsin have been 
showing First National productions. 



General cloning: of all neighborhood thea- 
tres for six weeks during the summer Is the 
drastic plan being sponsored by several 
leading members of the Motion Picture The- 
atre Owners of Milwaukee and most likely 
will be thoroughly discussed at the next 
meeting of the organization. Fred Seegert, 
president of the M. P. T. O. of Wisconsin and 
active in the Milwaukee local as well, is one 
of those heartily In accord with such an 
Idea. He has declared that he will support 
the move although It probably will be In- 
troduced by some one else. Milwaukee has 
approximately fifty neighborhood houses. 
The proposal Is certain to strike a snag, 
however, since various members have ex- 
pressed themselves as willing to take a 
chance on the weather and other handicaps 
and remain open, at least as long as pos- 
sible, as they have done heretofore. 



The Toy Theatre, located on Second street, 
just north of Milwaukee's main street, has 
been closed by Charles Toy, its owner, and 
will be remodeled shortly into a store. The 
house had the distinction of being Milwau- 
kee's smallest downtown film theatre, It be- 
ing equipped with only 425 seats. For some 
time it has been considered a losing propo- 
sition, and with the opening of the Wiscon- 
sin by the Saxe interests the going became 
even harder. George Beyer, manager of the 
place for six years, has accepted a position 
with the Midwest Distributing Co., also op- 
erated by Toy, the Chinese cafe and theatre 
owner. 



Starting merely as a protest against Sun- 
day noon concerts in Saxe's new Wisconsin 
Theatre, the move originating recently In 
Milwaukee church circles has been extended 
to include agitation against the showing of 
pictures as well before 1 p. m. on the Sab- 
bath. Most of the downtown houses have 
been in the habit of opening their picture 
programs at 11 a. m. on Sundays, and until 
the Wisconsin began to advertise its special 
noonday concerts, no opposition developed. 

Henry Staab, executive secretary of the 
M. P. T. O. of Wisconsin, is going to Wash- 
ington to attend the hearing April 25 on 
the proposed music tax amendment, it has 
been announced by Fred Seegert, president 
of the organization. Mr. Staab has given the 
music tax situation deep study, and is pre- 
pared to give a forceful argument against 
a continuaiton of the evil. 



The Southeast 

After being operated many years as a one- 
man town, controlled by the Howard-Wells 
Amusement Company, Wilmington, N. C., 
has developed into the film salesmen's mecca, 
with four-way opposition in the picture the- 
atre field. The latest interest to project 
itself into the local theatrical field here is 
George W. Bailey, who has secured a three- 
year lease, with renewal option, on the Royal 
Theatre, Front street first-run feature house, 
from the Howard-Wells interests, and 
opened April 21 with a straight picture pol- 
icy, standard prices and three changes a 
week. 

Jack Marcus, who since January 1 has 
operated both the Victoria and Royal thea- 
tres, has retained the Victoria and announces 
that this theatre will be operated also as a 
first-run house, with only the very largest 
super-productions therein, on a sliding scale 
of prices. This house has formerly present- 
ed only vaudeville, stock and road attrac- 
tions. 

Rival attractions for Easter Monday, 
aimed to draw "first blood" in the local fight, 
were "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" at 
the Victoria at *1 top and "Fnshlon Row" at 
the Royal at 40 cents top, both pictures be- 
ing first-run in the town. Both managements 
assert their intention of going after the bus- 
iness which, during the slump period of the 
past twelve months has been conveniently 
handled by the one house, while under iden- 
tical managements, and early release runs 
are announced on "Girl Shy," "Secrets," 
"Beau Brummell," "Three Weeks," "Lilies of 
the Field" and other new productions by the 
rival managements of the two big houses. 

The Bijou, the other downtown house, is 
operated by the Bijou Amusement Company, 
a grind 10-cent show. The fourth factor in 
the local field is Herbert C. Wales, exchange 
man with experience dating back to the old 
General Film days, who has opened the 
Brooklyn (colored) Theatre, playing a com- 
bination policy. The fifth house in the city, 
the Academy, is at present closed and is un- 
der lease to Bob Kermon, local fight pro- 
moter. 



Theatres of the St. Louis district were 
hard hit by burglars and yeggmen the past 
week. On the night of April 13, cracksmen 
who had concealed themselves in the Lyric 
Theatre, East St. Louis, until the house had 
closed for the night, entered the office and 
broke down the steel doors of the theatre 
vault, escaping with approximately $4,000, 
the Saturday and Sunday receipts. The 
same yeggs looted the safe of the Liberty 
Furniture Company, adjoining the theatre. 
The safe door was open, the burglars taking 
a revolver and some small articles. 

The same night robbers secured $600 from 
the New Shenandoah Theatre, 2227 South 
Broadway, St. Louis, after prying open a 
side door to the theatre. The money was 
taken from the projectionist's booth. 

At the Melba Theatre, 3600 South Grand 
boulevard, $40 was taken from the ticket 
seller's cage. Neither the Melba nor New 
Shenandoah carried burglary insurance. 



Joseph Walsh, secretary of the Motion Pic- 
ture Theatre Owners of Eastern Missouri 
and St. Louis, has purchased the Bridge The- 
atre, Natural Bridge avenue, St. Louis, from 
Worwick & Otto. 



E. G. McBride of Shelbyville, Mo., proprie- 
tor of the Opera House there, which was de- 
stroyed by fire the latter part of March, 
plans to rebuild. 



G. W. Vest, formerly of the Dixie Theatre, 
Des Arc, Ark., is now operating the Royal 
Theatre, Marvel, Ark. 



C. A. Edwards, owner of the Opera House, 
Coffeen, 111., lost his mother through death 
on April 15. 



Miss Nellie F. Herzog has purchased the 
Yale Theatre on Chippewa street, St. Louis. 



Mrs. Ruby Heyde will take possession of 
the Elks Theatre, Olney, 111., on May 1. No 
change in policy is contemplated. 



J. H. Riley's Cosey Theatre, Mountain 
Grove, Mo., opened to capacity business on 
April 15. 



The Moonshine, Wayne Lit), 111., and the 
Liberty, Logan, III., have closed temporarily. 
The New Grand, Frankfort Heights, III., has 
reopened under the management of Sullivan 
& Gray, who have operated the Rlalto at 
Marion, 111. 



W. E. Patterson of Huttick, III., has pur 
chased the Star Theatre, Palmyra, 111. 



Louis Maroni has purchased the Rialto 
Theatre, Marion, 111., from Sullivan & Gray. 
He plans a combination house. 



William Goldman, owner-manager of the 
Kings Theatre, St. Louis, has gone to New 
York. 

D. E. Platte of the Pastime Theatre, Kan- 
sas, 111., called at the F. B. O. exchange and 
signed up for the new series of "Fighting 
Blood." 



Out-of-town exhibitors seen along Picture 
Row during the week were: C. E. Brady and 
Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Doyle of Cape Girardeau, 
Mo.; Mrs. Paul of the Marvel. Carllnville, 
111.; Tom P. Ronan, Play House, Shelbyville, 
111.; Oscar Wesley, Gillespie, 111.; S. P. Ro- 
man, Benld, 111.; Bob Cluster, Johnston City 
and Belleville, 111.; Oscar Hortsman, Chappie, 
111., and L Jadowsky, Paris, 111. 



St. Louis theatres co-operated with the 
church in the observance of Holy Week, 
many of the downtown theatres being used 
for Good Friday noon services. 



The Lyric Theatre, Cavein-Rock, 111., which 
closed recently because of a smallpox epi- 
demic, has reopened. 



The new Washington Square Theatre, 
Quincy, 111., will open on June 15, according 
to present plans. "If Winter Comes" will 
be the opening feature. 



Released March 16, 1924— Now Booking 




^<^AL8ERri.6REY presents 

ZLOYD HAMf LT0M' 



HIS FIRST FIVE REEL COMEDY 

(Courtesy E.W.Hammons) 

Distributed t» H0DKINS0N 
Season 1924-1925 Thirty Fust-Run Pictures' 



STRAIGHRrom ilteSHOULDER REPQRE 

ADepafOment for. The Information of exhibitors 

EDITED BY A. VAN BUREN POWELL 



Associated Exhibitors 

GOING UP. (5,886 feet). Star, Douglas 
MacLean. Stands out like "2Zi/ 2 Hours Leave" 
and "Hottentot." One of those too uncommon 
things which fit the star like a glove. Kept 
the audience highly amused and sent every- 
body away happy. Moral tone good and It 
is suitable for any day. Had good at- 
tendance on off days. Draw all classes in 
town of 3,000. Admission 10-25-30. J. J. 
Wood, Redding Theatre (789 seats), Redding, 
California. 

GOING UP. (5,886 feet). Star cast. Good 
comedy but not as good as one is led to 
believe. Too much money for it. Moral tone 
O. K. and it is suitable for Sunday. Draw 
rural class in town of 850. Admission 10-25, 
10-35. W. F. Haycock, Star Theatre, Calla- 
way, Nebraska. 

HARBOR LIGHTS. (5 reels). Star, Tom 
Moore. The poorest Tom Moore I ever saw. 
Vaudeville saved the day for me on a Sunday. 
Not suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw all classes in suburban town. 
Admission 10-20. C. H. Douglass, Realart 
Theatre (500 seats), Los Angeles, California. 

IS DIVORCE A FAILURE? (5,448 feet). 
Star, Leah Balrd. A real good picture that 
pleased those who saw it. Small attendance 
because of a near blizzard. Pleased all 
classes. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had average attendance. Draw 
neighborhood class in city of 80,000. Admis- 
sion 10-15. M. F. Meade, Olive Theatre (450 
seats), St. Joseph, Missouri. 

UP IN THE AIR ABOUT MARY. (5 reels). 

Star cast. A good little comedy drama that 
pleased a Saturday night house. Moral tone 
good but it is rather weak for Sunday. Had 
average attendance. Draw neighborhood 
class in city of 80,000. Admission 10-15. M. 
F. Meade, Olive Theatre (450 seats), St. 
Joseph, Missouri. 

F. B. O. 

ALIMONY. (7 reels). Star cast. Nothing 
to rave over. Ordinary picture. Played it 
on a double bill. Moral tone fair. Had fair 
attendance. J. J. Spandan, Family Theatre, 
Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

BLOW YOUR OWN HORN. (6,315 feet) 
Star cast. Very good. Best house for weeks. 
Draw city and country class in town of 
3,500. Admission 10-20. G. A. Peterson, 
Lyric Theatre (250 seats), Sayre, Oklahoma. 

CANYON OF THE FOOLS. (5,180 feet). 
Star, Harry Carey. This one may have been 
good when it first came out but not now. All 
the action is out of it. It came on six reels 
but four of them only one-half full. Not 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw all classes in town of 2,800. Admission 
15-25. D. W. Strayer, Mt. Joy Theatre, Mt. 
Joy, Pennsylvania. 

CAPTAIN FLY-BY-NIGHT. (4,940 feet). 
Star, Johnny Walker. Very good picture, 
fairly good action picture. Action fans will 
like It. Print good. Moral tone good but it 
is not suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw all classes in town of 2,800. 
Admission 15-25. D. W. Strayer, Mt. Joy 
Theatre (250 seats), Mt. Joy, Pennsylvania. 

CRASHING THROUGH. (6 reels). Star. 
Harry Carey. Harry Carey loses interest in 
"Miracle Baby" and "Desert Driven." Good 
picture but nothing extra. Draw city and 
country class in town of 3,500. Admission 
10-20. G. A. Peterson, Lyric Theatre (250 
seats), Sayre, Oklahoma. 

DAYTIME WIVES. (6,651 feet). Star cast. 
Good. Drew well and can't go wrong on 
this one, if you buy it right. Moral torn- 
good. Draw city and country class in town 
of 3,500. Admission 10-20. G. A. Peterson, 
Lyrio Theatre (250 seats), Sayre, Oklahoma 



These dependable tips come from ex- 
hibitors who tell the truth about pic- 
tures to help you book your program 
intelligently. "It is my utmost desire to 
serve my fellow man," is their motto. 

Use the tips; follow the advice of ex- 
hibitors who agree with your experience 
on pictures you both have run. 

Send tips to help others. This is your 
department, run for you and maintained 
by your good-will. 

A monthly Index of reports appears 
in the last issue of each month, cumula- 
tive from January to June and from 
July to December. 



DAYTIME WIVES. (6,651 feet). Star oast. 
A really good picture worth showing any- 
where and anytime. Get it and then feature 
it. Print fine. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Attendance, not good. 
Draw all classes in town of 2,800. Admission 
15-25. D. W. Strayer, Mt. Joy Theatre, Mt. 
Joy, Pennsylvania. 

DAYTIME WIVES. (6,651 feet). Star, 
Wyndham Standing. Excellent picture. 
Should go big anywhere. Moral tone fine. 
Had fair attendance. Draw middle and lower 
class in city of 50,000. Admission fifteen 
cents. J. Hill Snyder, Scenic Theatre (630 
seats), York, Pennsylvania. 

FLYING DUTCHMAN. (5,800 feet). Star, 
Lawson Butt. A poor pleaser as the story is 
a dramatization of the fantastic legend. Few 
liked it. Moral tone O. K. and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw all classes in city of 
14,000. Admission 10-25. E. W. Collins, Lib- 
erty Theatre (500 seats), Jonesboro, Ar- 
kansas. 

FLYING DUTCHMAN. Star, Ella Hall. 
Why is it necessary to waste film stock and 
an audience's time with stuff like this? My 
audience is still sore at me. "Fighting Blood" 
saved the show. I wrote the exchange if 
they had any more "Cheese" like this under 
contract to just let pay for it and keep it. 
C. C. Kluts, Glades Theatre, Moore Haven, 
Florida. 

GALLOPING GALLAGER. (4,700 feet). 
Star, Fred Thompson. Here's is a xeal actor 
and with plenty of action and to my notion 
has got it on all of the so-called western 
actors barring none. Suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw working class 



in city of 13,000. Admission 10-20. G. M. 
Bertling. Favorite Theatre (187 seats). 
Piqua, Ohio. 

HUMAN WRECKAGE. (7,215 feet). Star, 
Mrs. Wallace Reid. A truly great picture. 
Everyone should see it. It's above the 
average. Draw middle and lower class in 
city of 50,000. Admission fifteen cents. J. Hill 
Snyder, Scenic Theatre (630 seats), York, 
Pennsylvania. 

IN THE NAME OF THE LAW. (6,126 feet). 
Star cast. Exceptionally fine for small 
towns. Clean and wholesome. Cutout of 
traffic cop from three sheet set at street in- 
tersections good, cheap stunt. Moral tone 
fine and it is suitable for Sunday. Had bis: 
attendance. Draw farming class in town of 
600. Admission 15-25. C. C. Kluts, Glades 
Theatre (200 seats) Moore Haven, Florida. 

JUDGMENT OF THE STORM, (6,329 feet). 
Star cast. Wonderful picture to unusual busi- 
ness. Town of 5,000. Admission 10-20. Fre- 
donia Opera House, Fredonia, New York. 

JUDGMENT OF THE STORM. (6,329 

feet). Star cast. One of the big pictures of 
the screen. Bad weather held us back. Draw 
Theatre (630 seats), York, Pennsylvania, 
middle and lower class in city of 50,000. Ad- 
mission fifteen cents. J. Hill Snyder, Scenic 
Theatre, York, Pennsylvania. 

JUDGMENT OP THE STORM. (6,329 feet). 
Star cast. Very good picture. Played to 
good business for two days. Moral tone very 
good. Had good attendance. J. J. Spandan, 
Family Theatre, Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

LIGHTS OUT. (6,938 feet). Star cast. A 
crackerjack little picture that will please 
most any audience. New, novel and different. 
Bought right it will fare well with your pub- 
lic. It's a clever picture. Moral tone O. K. 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had average 
attendance. Draw all classes in city of 14,- 
000. Admission 10-25. E. W. Collins, Lib- 
erty Tfaeatre (500 seats), Jonesboro, Ar- 
kansas. 

MAILMAN. (7,160 feet). Star, Ralph Lewis. 
Excellent picture with splendid acting. 
Should please any audience. Moral tone fine 
and is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw all classes in town of 4,000. Ad- 
mission 10-20. F. A. Brown, A-Muse-U Thea- 
tre (300 seats), Frederick, Oklahoma. 

MIRACLE BABY. (6 reels). Star, Harry 
Carey. This is the poorest Harry Carey I 
ever played. Carey as much out of place in 
this picture as if Valentino would appear In 
the pulpit. If you play do not mention 
Harry Carey. Had good attendance. E. H. 
Haubrook, Ballard Theatre, Seattle, Wash- 
ington. 

THELMA. (6,000 feet). Star, Jane Novak. 



Released April 20, 1924— Booking 
Reservations Now 



WANDERING HUSBANDS 




m 



James Kirkwood 
ariLilaLee 

MARGARET LIVINGSTON 
Prtitntrd Ay IJEGAL PICTURES INC. 

for HODKINSON RELEASE 

Stason 1924-1925 Thirty first-Rim Pittuirs 



58 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



A mighty fine picture and should go over 
anywhere fine. Scenery good and the star 
herself does some good acting. Suitable for 
Sunday. Draw all classes in town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-15. A. E. Rogers, Temple 
Theatre (240 seats). Dexter, New York. 

WESTBOUND LIMITED. (5,100 feet). Star, 
Ralph Lewis. An old one that drew above 
average and seemed to please. Not as good as 
"The Third Alarm" nor "In the Name of the 
Law." Print cut up badly. Moral tone ex- 
cellent and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
thirty per cent, increase in attendance. Draw 
neighborhood class in city of 80,000. Admis- 
sion 10-15. M. F. Meade, Olive Theatre (450 
seats), St. Joseph, Missouri. 

WHEN LOVE COMES. (4,800 feet). Star, 
Helen Jerome Eddy. An old fashioned com- 
edy drama of the style of ten years ago. So 
poorly was it received that we withdrew it 
after the first performance. Moral tone O. 
K. but it is not suitable for Sunday nor any 
other day. Attendance, withdrawn. Draw all 
classes in city of 14,000. Admission 10-25, 
10-35. E. W. Collins. Grand Theatre (700 
seats), Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

First National 

ANNA CHRISTIE. (7,631 feet). Star, 
Blanche Sweet. A film classic, acting great, 
direction ditto. You've got to look out for one 
thing in the small town; the theme of the 
picture. It's drama every inch of the way, 
handled beautifully, and only the prude will 
squawk. Buy it right and play it. Usual ad- 
vertising brought good attendance. Dave Sey- 
mour, Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, Saranac 
Lake, New York. 

ASHES OP VENGEANCE. (10 reels). Star, 
Norma Talmadge. A high class production 
that pleased ninety per cent of my patrons. 
A picture that one may feel justly proud of 
presenting to his patrons. Justifies a raise 
in admission prices and special advertising. 
Moral tone good. Had good attendance. Draw 
small town and country class in town of 
2,245. Admission 10-25. W. J. Powell, Lonet 
Theatre (229 seats), Wellington, Ohio. 

BAD MAN. (6,404 feet). Star, Holbrook 
Blinn. Pleased old and young alike. Re- 
ceived many compliments from patrons. Not 
the kind of picture that they laugh outright 
at very often, but one that keeps them smil- 
ing all the time. Held up well the second 
night. Moral tone good. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw small town and country class 
in town of 2,245. Admission 10-25. W. J. 
Powell, Lonet Theatre (229 seats), Welling- 
ton, Ohio. 

BELL BOY 13. (3,940 feet). Star, Douglas 
MacLean. A good snappy picture full of 
laughs. Good reels. Moral tone good and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Hod good attendance. 
H. W. Mathers, Morris Run Theatre, Morris 
Run, Pennsylvania. 

BLACK OXEN. (7,927 feet). Star, Corinne 
Griffith. The story of a girl born in America 
who marries an Austrian who abused her, 
has her youth restored and is then willing 
to sacrifice love in America to go back and 
help Austria again. They do not do it. 
Story interesting, well told, and actors are 



Between Ourselves 

A get-together place where 
toe can talk things over 



Stepping along*! That's Straight 
From the Shoulder these days. 

It's your department. You have made 
it grow: if you want it still bigger in 
space and scope just get the habit of 
shooting in the tips every week. 

Suggestions too! The fellows have 
taken active interest and that's why I 
have been able to add features that the 
crowd finds useful. 

Whenever you think of something that 
will be better than what we are doing 
now with the tips, speak right out in 
meeting and if modern publishing 
methods permit it, your suggestion will 
be adopted. 

F'r instance — notice Mr. Klutts' idea 
on the next page. Don't you figure that 
would be a good stunt? VAN. 



at their best. Drew »»ood business and 
pleases lovers of the book. Moral tone good 
and it Is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw general class in city of 16,- 
000. Admission 30-40. Ben. L. Morris, Temple 
Theatre (1,000 seats), Bellaire, Ohio. 

BLACK OXEN. (7,937 feet). Star, Corinne 
Griffith. The picture was nicely done. Pleased 
women far more than the men. Draw mixed 
class in town of 1,900. Admission varies. L. 
G. Roesner, Colonial Theatre (800 seats), 
Winona, Minnesota. 

BLACK OXEN. (7,937 feet). Star, Corinne 
Griffith. An excellent production. Pictures 
are much better than ever before. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
fair attendance. Draw all classes in city of 
15,000. Admission 10-35. S. A. Hayman, Lyda 
Theatre (360 seats), Grand Island, Nebraska. 

BLACK OXEN. (7,937 feet). Star, Corinne 
Griffith. Good picture that made them talk. 
Pleased them all. Regular advertising 
brought good attendance. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Adolph Schutz, 
Fort Bayard Theatre, Fort Bayard, New 
Mexico. 

BOND BOY. (6,902 feet). Star, Richard 
Barthelmess. First time for star and he 
pleased everyone. A good picture and a good 
lesson. Give us more like it and we'll be 
satisfied. Suitable for Sunday. Draw all 
classes in town of 1,000. Admission 10-15. A. 
E. Rogers, Temple Theatre (240 seats). 
Dexter, New York. 

BRASS BOTTLE. (5,290 feet). Star, Harry 
Meyers. This was so queer and senseless 
that our patrons acted bewildered, some 
wanted to know what it was all about, 
others went out making sport of It. Moral 



tone not extra good. Not suitable for Sun- 
day or any other day. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw farmers and business class in 
town of 2,200. Admission 10-25. A F. Jenkins, 
Community Theatre (491 seats), David City, 
Nebraska. 

BRASS BOTTLE. (5,290 feet). Star cast. 
Impossible story. Some people liked it, others 
didn't. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw all 
classes in city of 15,000. Admission 10-35. S. 
A. Hayman, Lyda Theatre (360 seats), Grand 
Island, Nebraska. 

BRAWN OF THE NORTH. (7,650 feet). 
Star, Strongheart (dog). Too much dog, real 
action missing. Did not take well. Wonder- 
ful photography. Good reels. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. H. W. Mathers, Morris 
Run Theatre, Morris Run, Pennsylvania, 

CHASTITY. (6 reels). Star, Katherlne 
McDonald. Another reason why people listen 
in on the radio. Terribly draggy and no 
entertainment value. One good cabaret 
scene. Moral tone not good and it is not 
suitable for Sunday. Had poor attendance. 
Draw family and student class in town of 
4,000. Admission 10-25. R. J. Relf, Star 
Theatre (600 seats), Decorah, Iowa. 

CHILDREN OF THE DUST. (6,228 feet). 
Star, Johnny Walker. One of the nicest little 
pictures I ever ran. One that holds an audi- 
ence's attention from start to finish. Very, 
very good. Poor attendance due to weather. 
Draw mixed class in town of 4,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25-35. Thomas L. Barnett, Finn's 
Theatre (600 seats), Jewett City, Connecti- 
cut. 

CHILDREN OF THE DUST. (6,228 feet). 
Star, Pauline Garon. Very good. A differ- 
ent sort of picture with three children in 
the cast that are hard to beat. Moral tone 
very good and it is suitable for Sunday. 
Had fair attendance. Draw all classes in 
city of 65,000. Admission 10-25-35-50. H. W. 
Irons, Franklin Theatre (1,600 seats), Sagi- 
naw, Michigan. 

CIRCUS DAYS. (6,100 feet). Star, Jackie 
Coogan. Fine production, will draw the 
kids. Moral tone good and it Is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw all 
classes in city of 15,000. Admission 10-35. 
S. A Hayman, Lyda Theatre (360 seats), 
Grand Island, Nebraska. 

DADDY. (5,738 feet). Star, Jackie Coo- 
gan. Suitable in any theatre and if bought 
so you can get out on it, you'll be glad to 
have shown it. Print I received was not 
;he best. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw farmers in town of 2.500. Admission 
10-20, 10-25. H. J. Longaker, Howard Thea- 
tre (350 seats), Alexandria, Minnesota. 

DANGEROUS MAID. (7,337 feet). Star, Con- 
stance Talmadge. One more like this and 
Constance is done. People want modern up- 
to-date stories, costumes, don't go. Used to 
stand them in front on Talmadge but noth- 
ing doing on this one. Lay oft of this kind 
of stories, Miss Talmadge, or you'll loose 
out. Everybody here used to be wild about 
you. Moral tone fair. Attendance, not much. 
Draw all classes in town of three thousand. 
W. H. Odom, Pastime Theatre, Sandersville, 
Georgia. 

ETERNAL FLAME. (7,453 feet). Star, 
Norma Talmadge. Wonderful picture. Norma 
favorite here. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw all classes In town of 1,500. Admission 
10-25. Miss Douglas Robertson, Princess 
Theatre (200 seats), Flemingsburg, Ken- 
tucky. 

FLAMING YOUTH. (8,434 feet). Star, Col- 
leen Moore. Played this picture for two days, 
and boys step on this one, as it is a great 
picture. Moral tone good but it Is not suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Town of 2,500. I. M. Hlrshblond, Traco 
Theatre, Tomt River, New Jersey. 

FLAMING YOUTH. (8,434 feet). Star, Col- 
leen Moore. Pleased the women. Too long 
drawn out for a semi-jazz picture and exhi- 
bition value way too high for a small town. 
Perfectly clean but rather mushy. Moral tone 
fair and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw family and student 
class in town of 4,000. Admission 10-25. R. 
J. Relf, Star Theatre (700 seats), Decorah, 
Iowa. 



Released April 27, 1924— Booking 
Reservations Now 



r ETTY COMPSON 
MIAMI 

An Alan CrcslandfiwducUcn 

A-cducrd hj Gilford Cinema Corp. 

£r H0DKINS0N RELEASE 

Season 1Q24-1925 Thirty first-Run Pictures 




May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



59 



FLAMING YOUTH. (8,434 feet). Star, Col- 
leen Moore. A knockout of a picture acting 
of Miss Moore and Milton Sills the very best. 
A timely picture that ought to please the 
most critical audience. Photography and 
direction great. Good moral tone and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Advertised with every- 
thing to good attendance. Draw best class in 
the world, veterans of the World War in 
town of 600. Admission 15-30. Adolph Schutz, 
Fort Bayard Theatre (300 seats), Fort Bay- 
ard, New Mexico. 

FLAMING YOUTH. (8,434 feet). Star, Col- 
leen Moore. Medium or common people liked 
this one, rich didn't. I thought it a knockout. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw all classes 
in city of 15,000. Admission 10-35. S. A. 
Hayman. Lyda Theatre (360 seats), Grand 
Island, Nebraska. 

FLAMING YOUTH. (8,434 feet). Star, 
Milton Sills. Youth, joy, jazz, cigarettes, 
cocktails, neckers, petters, white kisses, red 
kisses, pep, nerve, spice. All to be seen in 
"Flaming Youth." William Noble, Rialto 
Theatre Oklahoma City Oklahoma. 

FLAMING YOUTH. (8,434 feet). Star, Col- 
leen Moore. This is what I call a one hun- 
dred percent picture. My patrons sure raved 
about It. It's the best picture I have shown 
this year. You can't go wrong if you buy 
this one. Why don't they make more like 
this? Draws all classes in town of 2,000 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Admission 20-40. W. E. Norris, Pleas- 
ant Hour Theatre (240 seats), Woodsfield. 
Ohio. 

GAS. OIL AND WATER. (4,500 feet). Star, 
Charles Ray. Nothing to this picture. This 
kind hurt business. First National pictures 
usually good, but they don't mind disappoint- 
ing you. Moral tone fair and it >s suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Miss 
Douglas Robertson, Princess Theatre (200 
seats), Flemingsburg, Kentucky. 

GOLDEN SNAKE. (6 reels). Star cast. A 
good program picture of the north woods, 
full of action. Moral tone good and It is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw miners and business class in town of 
1,000. Admission 10-25. Lee Dillingham, Kozy 
Theatre (200 seats), Nortonville, Kentucky. 

GOLDFISH. Star, Constance Talmadge. 
A scream of mirth. It's a peacherino with a 
zip and a go and a snap, a love laugh. A 
comedy-drama that sparkles and bubbles. As 
Mrs. Krauss in "The Goldfish," Constance will 
be the centre of attraction for every sheik 
from Portland, Maine, to Portland, Oregon. 
At first a piano picker, after divorce, she is 
remarried and becomes a young Fifth Ave- 
nue matron of impeccable taste. See Con- 
stance in "The Goldfish" and you'll be both 
pleased and satisfied. William Noble, Em- 
press Theatre, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

HER REPUTATION. (7 reels). Star, May 
McAvoy. A good program picture that was 
well liked. Cast good. Ran four days. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
fair attendance. Draw all classes in city of 
65,000. Admission 10-25-35-50. H. W. Irons, 
Franklin Theatre (1,600 seats), Saginaw, 
Michigan. 

HER TEMPORARY HUSBAND. (6,723 feet). 
Star, Owen Moore. A picture with not a par- 
ticularly good title. Buy this right, and get 
busy and you'll do a lot of business, pro- 
vided your folks like good comedy. Usual 
advertising brought good attendance. Draw 
health seekers and tourists. Dave Seymour, 
Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, Saranac Lake, 
New York. 

HOTTENTOT. (5,953 feet). Star, Douglas 
MacLean. Very good comedy drama. Pleased 
one hundred percent. Film not in very good 
condition. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
town and country class in town of 800. 
Admission 10-30. Chas. L. Nott, Opera 
House (400 seats), Sutherland, Iowa. 

HUNTRESS. (6,236 feet). Star, Colleen 
Moore. This Is a dandy program picture, 
and this beautiful little star is getting more 
popular every day. Everybody liked her as 
the Indian maid, scenery beautiful. Moral 
tone fine and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
fair attendance. Draw farmers and business 
class in town of 2,200. Admission 10-25. A. 
F. Jenkins, Community Theatre (491 seats), 
David City, Nebraska. 



Mr. Klutts Makes A 
Suggestion 



"Dear Van — and the boys — I'm 
a small town exhibitor and have 
just recently started reading and 
being guided by Straight From the 
Shoulder tips. 

"On report slips I notice a blank 
for 'Attendance.' The thought has 
occurred to me that 'Audience 
Appeal' would be more suitable 
than 'Attendance.' The attendance 
can be what the exhibitor makes 
it, but that audience appeal of the 
picture is what's IN THE 
PICTURE. 

"In the ordinary small town 
the exhibitor could take a poor 
picture, smash on the exploitation 
and pull a big crowd in — (the 
audience depends upon the exhi- 
bitor to KNOW that particular 
audience's preferences) — but if 
the stuff wasn't in the picture — ! 

"From the above angle I sub- 
mit that the term 'Audience ap- 
peal' is more fitting. Send me some 
more blanks — a whole sheaf of 
them: I feel we exhibitors owe 
each other frankness." — C. C. 
Klutts, Glades Theatre, Moore 
Haven, Florida. 



ISLE OF LOST SHIPS. (7,425 feet). Star, 
Milton Sills. Pleased on account of the ex- 
treme action, which pleased the majority 
here. Moral tone good and It is suitable 
for Sunday. Had poor attendance. Draw 
miners. Admission 15-25. Charles F. Kear, 
Opera House (450 seats), Minersville, Penn- 
sylvania. 

LOVE MASTER. (6,779 feet). Star, Strong- 
heart, (dog). More power to this canine won- 
der. May his tribe increase. A suitable fea- 
ture for most any theatre and a sure-fire 
drawing card. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for any day. Had good attendance. 
Draw all classes in town of 3,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25-30. J. J. Wood, Redding Theatre 
(789 seats), Redding, California. 

MEANEST MAN IN WORLD. (6,500 feet). 
Star cast. A good program comedy drama. If 
house had been large they would have got- 
ten much contagious mirth out of it. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 



small attendance. Draw farmers In town of 
2,500. Admission 10-20, 10-25. H. J. Long- 
aker, Howard Theatre (350 seats), Alexandria, 
Minnesota. 

MEANEST MAN IN THE WORLD. (6,500 
feet). Star, Bert Lytell. Splendid comedy 
drama with many laugh producing situa- 
tions. First four reels were especially 
good. Latter part of the picture slowed 
down considerably, but got by in fine shape. 
The kind of picture that entertains, but don't 
send them out talking. Second night light. 
Moral tone good. Had fair attendance. Draw 
small town and country class in town of 2,- 
245. Admission 10-25. W. J. Powell, Lonet 
Theatre (229 seats), Wellington, Ohio. 

MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE. (8.036 feet). Star, 
Dorothy Mackaill. A mighty fine picture, 
and well liked by all my patrons. Some said 
it was very good, older class. Suitable for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw various 
classes in town of 2,100. Admission 6-10-15. 
A. S. Carlos, Bijou Theatre (350 seats), Jean- 
erette, Louisiana. 

MIGHTY LAK' A ROSE. (8,036 feet). Star, 
Dorothy Mackaill. Ran this on Thanksgiving. 
A good picture and the acting of Miss Mac- 
kaill and James Renee above comparison. 
Moral tone very good. Had good attendance. 
Draw neighborhood class in town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-20. Henry C. MoCoy, Elite 
Theatre (235 seats), Golconda, Illinois. 

OLIVER TWIST. (7,900 feet). Star, Jackie 
Coogan. Those who had not read Dicken's 
book were disappointed. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw rural class in town of 250. Ad- 
mission 15-25-35. J. J. Halley, San Andrews 
Theatre (110 seats), San Andrews, California, 

PAINTED PEOPLE. (5,700 feet). Star, 
Colleen Moore. A much better audience pic- 
ture than "Flaming Youth" but didn't pull 
as well. Not a special and exhibition value 
way too high! Moral tone O. K. and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw family and student class in town of 
4,000. Admission 10-25. R. J. Relf, Star Thea- 
tre (600 seats), Decorah, Iowa. 

PAINTED PEOPLE. (5,700 feet). Star, 
Colleen Moore. A clever comedy drama but 
missed being a big picture. As a production 
not in the class of "Flaming Youth." Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Draw 
all classes in town of 7,000. Admission 10-35. 
R J. M. Leon, Palace Theatre (220 seats), 
Washington Court House, Ohio. 

PENROD. (8,037 feet). Star, Wesley Barry. 
This one will get every kid in town. A 
little old but films in good shape. A dandy 
comedy, but not much story. Don't pay too 
much and you can clean up with this one. 
Moral tone O. K. and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had full house for attendance. Draw 
miners and business class in town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-25. Lee Dillingham, Kozy Thea- 
tre (200 seats), Nortonville, Kentucky. 

SONG OF LOVE. (8,000 feet). Star, Norma 
Talmadge. A good picture with the acting 
of Miss Talmadge away above par consider 
this to be the best Norma Talmadge up to 
date. Pleased everyone. Regular advertis- 
ing to good attendance. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Draw best class in 
the world, veterans of the World War In 



Released May 11, 1924 — Booking Reservations 

Now 




Dorothy Mackaill 



in If 



WHAT SHAIL I DO 

a frank E.Wbods Special Production 
. £ HODKINSON DELEASE 

Season 1924 1925 HiirtyRrst-RunRctures (S 




60 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



town of 600. Admission 15-30. Adolph Schutz, 
Fort Bayard Theatre (300 seats), Fort Bay- 
ard, New Mexico. 

WHITE SHOULDERS. (5,966 feet). Star, 
Katherine McDonald. Fair picture that 
brought fair attendance. City of 110,000. 
Admission 10-20. Al. C. Werner, Royal Thea- 
tre, Reading-, Pennsylvania. 

WITHIN THE LAW. (8,034 feet). Star, 
Norma Talmadge. An excellent vehicle for 
Miss Talmadge, well acted, cast and staged 
and a good drawing card for the exhibitor. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw all classes 
in town of 3,000. Admission 10-25-30. J. J. 
Wood, Redding Theatre (789 seats), Redding, 
California. 

WITHIN THE LAW, (8,034 feet). Star, 
Norma Talmadge. A splendid picture but in 
terrible condition. Whole scenes cut out. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw student 
and educated class in town of 2,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25 regular, special 15-35. K. F. 
Van Norman, Star Theatre (350 seats), Mans- 
field, Pennsylvania. 

WOMAN HE MARRIED. (6,582 feet). Star. 
Anita Stewart. Another one of the weak 
little program pictures that Anita Stewart 
always appears in. Why don't they put her 
in something that is different from what she 
has done before. The old girl is slipping fast 
at the box office through no fault of hers 
but of those who select her stories. Pleased 
very few. Hope she does better in "The 
Love Piker," which we have coming. Moral 
tone fair and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw general class in town 
of 1,000. Admission 10-25, 15-35. H. H. Hed- 
berg, Amuse-U Theatre, Melville, Louisiana. 

Fox 

BUSTER. (4,587 feet). Star, Dustin Far- 
num. Would have been best Farnum we 
ever ran if it had all been there. Two or 
three entire scenes "cut out." Fox exchanges 
seem to think "Title and Subtitles" with a 
"Jump Off" somewhere near the original 
"end," is all that small exhibitor requires. 
Out of twenty-six Fox we have run above 
covers half of them. Moral tone O. K. and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw farm and oil class in town of 508. J. 
A. Herring, Play House Theatre (249) seats). 
Strong, Arkansas. 

CUPID'S FIREMAN. (5,000 feet). Star, 
Charles "Buck" Jones. Jones very much mis- 
cast in this one. Imagine a big overgrown 
man with a life ambition to become a fire- 
man. Story ridiculous. Moral tone good. Had 
very good attendance. J. J. Spandan, Family 
Theatre, Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

CUPID'S FIREMAN. (5,000 feet). Star, 
Charles Jones. One of those melodramas that 
lacks plausibility, and it will answer in the 
very small town where they are not par- 
ticular, not for the discriminating audience 
at all. Usual advertising. Attendance, 
played this on a Saturday to less than aver- 
age Saturday business. Draw health seekers 
and tourists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac Theatre 
Beautiful, Saranac Lake, New York. 



Want a Scenic? 



"If any of the boys want a good 
scenic addition to their program, here's 
a tip that may be of use to some. 

"The C. & N. W. Railroad Company 
recently lent us a three reel travelogue 
covering a tour through the Yellowstone 
and Rocky Mountain National Parks 
without charge; the only condition be- 
ing that we take good care of their film 
and pay the transportation charges one 
way. 

"The subject was certainly interesting 
and the photography was excellent. Not 
a single misframe to cause a jump. Pat- 
rons complimented us for showing it. 

"Should any of the fellows desire to 
runt i, write Mr. F. J. Collins, Manager 
Department of Tours, C. & N. W. Rail- 
way, 148 S. Clark St., Chicago, 111. .He 
lent it to us without question and I'm 
sure he'd do likewise with any other 
exhibitor." H. H. Hedberg, A- Muse- U 
Theatre, Melville, Louisiana. 



DOES IT PAY? (6,652 feet). Star, Hope 
Hampton. A long eight reel supposed to be 
special. Another of Fox's miss outs. No draw 
to it. Moral tone fine. Had very poor at- 
tendance. Draw mixed class in town of 2,- 
500. Admission 10-25. J. H. Watts, Scotland 
Theatre (600 seats), Laurinburg, North Caro- 
lina. 

DOES IT PAY? (6,652 feet). Star cast. Only 
a fair program picture. Not a special by any 
means. Town of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake 
Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, 
Oklahoma. 

CUSTARD CUP. (6,166 feet). Star, Mary 
Carr. This is another excellent production 
and one that no exhibitor should pass up. 
It's an excellent comedy drama. Goo<l 
moral tone, suitable for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Town and country class, town 
of 500. Admission 10-25. A. F. Schreiver. 
Oneida Theatre (225 seats), Oneida, South 
Dakota. 

ELEVENTH HOUR. (6,819 feet). Star 
Charles "Buck" Jones. This Is a good pic- 
ture. Pleased ninety per cent. Did well on 
it and bought it right. Suitable for Sunday. 
Draw common class In town of 7,500. Ad- 
mission 10-25. Otis Woodring, Palace Thea- 
tre (800 seats), Blackwell, Oklahoma. 

ELEVENTH HOUR. (6,819 feet). Star cast. 
Someone certainly cheated the special mak- 
ers. This one would make an ideal serial 
but as a special it is a failure. Town of 1,- 
500. Admission 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy Thea- 
tre (600 seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

ELEVENTH HOUR. (6,819 feet). Star cast. 
This is a box office picture. Advertise it and 
come out if you did not pay too much for It. 
It will please any audience. Moral tone fair 
but it is not suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw mixed class in town of 



2,500. Admission 10-25. J. H. Watts, Scot- 
land Theatre (600 seats), Laurinburg, North 
Carolina. 

EYES OF THE FOREST. (5 reels). Star, 
Tom Mix. Just a fair picture. The aeroplane 
stunts get the picture over. Not as good 
as the average, but business very good for 
two days. Dropped the third day. Moral 
tone good. Had good attendance. J. J. Span- 
dan, Family Theatre, Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

EYES OF FOREST. (5 reels). Star, Tom 
Mix. So/ne picture and some drawing card. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had capacity attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 2.000. Admission 10-30. 
H. Loyd, Colonial Theatre (400 seats), Post. 
Texas. 

EYES OF THE FOREST. (5 reels). Star. 
Tom Mix. We played this with Annette Kel- 
lerman in "Venus of the South Seas" and 
the combination went sure-fire. Now we don't 
know which .did the trick. Use your own 
judgment. Had excellent attendance. Draw 
general class in town of 23,000. Admission 
18-35. Frank Franer, Empire Theatre, New 
London, Connecticut. 

FACE ON THE BARROOM FLOOR. (5.787 
feet). Star cast. This is a good program 
picture but do not see how it can be classed 
a special. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
farming class In town of 350. Admission 
20-35. C. W. Mills, Outlook Theatre (200 
seats). Outlook, Montana. 

FACE ON THE BARROOM FLOOR. (6,787 

feet). Star cast. Excellent picture with a 
good story. Scenes and settings beautiful. 
Acting of Walthall good. He Is one of our 
best drawing cards. Moral tone good. At- 
tendance, big crowd. Draw neighborhood 
class in town of 1,100. Admission 10-20. Henry 
C. McCoy, Elite Theatre (235 seats), Golconda, 
Illinois. 

GENTLE JULIA. (5,837 feet). Star, Bessie 
Love. A very nice picture. Not a picture that 
you will do any great amount of business on, 
but it will create a very favorable Impres- 
sion, and it's as clean as can be. Used every- 
thing for advertising. Had pretty good at- 
tendance. Draw health seekers and tourists. 
Dave Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, 
Saranac Lake, New York. 

GENTLE JULIA. (5,837 feet). Star cast. 
Everybody roasted me on this so-called spe- 
cial. Even the editor of paper here roasted 
me in his paper. Called it a ten cent pic- 
ture. Hurt my business. Worse than any- 
thing yet. Why does Fox turn pictures like 
this for specials. Only program picture. 
Booked to me two days. I left town second 
day. They are still kidding me, about this 
picture. Moral tone fair and It Is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance first day 
— rotten second day. Draw all classes in 
town of three thousand. W. H. Odom, Pas- 
time Theatre, Sanderville, Georgia. 

GOOD BYE GIRLS. (4,746 feet). Star, Wil- 
liam Russell. This one was a scream from 
start to finish. A six reel comedy drama. 
Used a Sunshine comedy and had several 
warm slaps on the shoulder as patrons went 
out. Moral tone very good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had very good attendance. Draw 
miners and business class in town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-25. Draw miners and business 
class in town of 1,000. Admission 10-25. Lee 
Dillingham, Kozy Theatre (200 seats), Nor- 
tonville, Kentucky. 

GOVERNOR'S LADY. (7,669 feet). Star 
cast. Exceedingly poor and cannot be 
classed as a good program picture. Many 
adverse criticisms from patrons. Quite a few 
walkouts. Picture too long, no popular 
player, sobby story and of a calico nature. 
Moral tone alright. Suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw college class in town 
of 4,000. C. W. Cupp, Royal Theatre (400 
seats), Arkadelphia. 

GOVERNOR'S LADY. (7,669 feet). Star 
cast. No good. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had poor attendance. 
Draw all classes in town of 2,000. Admission 
10-30. H. Loyd, Colonial Theatre (400 seats). 
Post, Texas. 

GOVERNOR'S LADY'. (7,069 feet). Star 
cast. Fox specials are good gold diggers for 
exhibitors. That's straight from the heart 
talk. Had poor attendance. Draw mixed 
class in town of 2,500. Admission 10-25. J. 
H. Watts, Scotland Theatre (600 seats), 
Laurinburg, North Carolina. 



Released May 18, 1924— Booking 
Reservations Now 



HARRY CAREY M 





e LIGHTNING RJDEIV 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



61 



GREAT NIGHT. (4.346 feet). Star, Wil- 
liam Russell. Everybody seemed to think 
this some picture. A dandy for our audience 
Nothing big- but a dandy little one. Moral 
tone O. K. and it is suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw working class 
in town of 4,000. Admission fifteen cents 
Mitchell Conery, I. O. O. F. Hall (225 seats), 
Green Island, New York. 

HELL'S HOLE. (6 reels). Star, Charles 
"Buck" Jones. Only a fair picture by no 
means a special. Town of 1,500. Admission 
10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 seats), 
Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

IF WINTER COMES. (10 reels). Star, 
Percy Marmount. A real good picture but 
will please only high class audiences. Too 
much sob stuff. The picture certainly died 
here. Moral tone O. K. and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Town of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake 
Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, 
Oklahoma. 

IF WINTER COMES. (10 reels). Star cast. 
Good picture but too long. People com- 
plained about length. Did not draw very 
good for us. Moral tone good and it 's suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
better class in town of 3,900. Admission 
thirty cents. Joseph Angros, Palace Theatre 
(440 seats), Leechburg, Pennsylvania. 

IF WINTER COMES. (10 reels). Star, 
Percy Marmont. Good, but over-rated. For 
my people it suited about fifty-fifty. Some 
said too droll, others preferred American 
locale instead of English, which means books 
of English locale not in demand. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
very light attendance. Draw farmers in 
town of 2,500. Admission 10-20, 10-25. H. J. 
Longaker, Howard Theatre (350 seats), 
Alexandria, Minnesota. 

JUST OFF BROADWAY. (5,444 feet). Star, 
John Gilbert. Detective story. Secret serv- 
ice. Moral tone fair and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw high 
class. Admission 20-30-40. Louis Isenberg, 
Elmwood Theatre (1,600 seats), Buffalo, 
New York. 

KENTUCKY DAYS. (5 reels). Star, Dus- 
tin Farnum. Can't give much to this one. 
Played it on Saturday and just sneaked by, 
quite a few made unfavorable comments on 
the picture, but I had a great filler program 
and escaped serious injury. Usual adver- 
tising brought fairly good attendance, but 
not up to Saturday average. Draw health 
seekers and tourists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac 
Theatre Beautiful, Saranac Lake, New York. 

LADIES TO BOARD. (6,112 feet). Star, 
Tom Mix. This is the worst Mix I ever ran. 
Not much doing in the first three reels. After 
that it picks up and the last reel is pretty 
good. Tom Mix does very little and Tony 
even less. Pee Wee Holmes is the real star. 
There are several slightly offensive scenes 
and part of the paper could not be used 
In some towns. Photography was bad in 
spots. I believe it would be a knockout in 
some houses, but my people like Mix in a 
western with lots of comedy. I am compar- 
ing it with other Mix's and not with ordinary 
pictures. Mix is the biggest drawing card 
I have. Not suitable for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Draw all classes in small town. 
Admission 10-33. M. W. Larmour, National 
Theatre (450 seats), Graham, Texas. 

LADIES TO BOARD. (6,112 feet). Star, Tom 
Mix. This is one of Tom's best bets, stood 
them outside for hours. Attendance, extra 
big. Draw middle and lower class in city of 
50,000. Admission fifteen cents. J. Hill Sny- 
der, Scenic Theatre (630 seats), York, Penn- 
sylvania. 

LONE STAR RANGER. (5,259 feet). Star, 
Tom Mix. Believe it came nearer pleasing 
one hundred per cent, than any other Mix 
we ever played. Suitable for Sunday. Had 
extra good attendance. Draw small town class 
in town of 3,500. Admission 20-35. P. L. 
Vann, Opera House (800 seats), Greenville, 
Alabama. 

LONE STAR RANGER. (5,259 feet). Star, 
Tom Mix. Best Mix has done. Excellent di- 
rection and the best produced western I have 
ever seen. Had fair attendance. Draw rail- 
road class In ttown of 2,705. Admission 10- 
25, 15-30. W. C. Witt, Strand Theatre (450 
seats), Irvine, Kentucky. 

MILE A MINUTE ROMEO. Star, Tom Mix. 
Not so good as many of his former pictures. 
Seem9 to lack something but hard to say 



Comedy Carnival 



"This was something new to 
us, but it sure went over big. 

"I ran three two-reel comedies 
and two one-reelers. No feature. 
Pathe subjects: Lloyd; Turpin, 
etc. 

"They all seemed to like it; but 
I would not try it too often. 
Should work fine in small town." 
— George W. Petengill, High 
School Movies, St. Petersburg, 
Florida. 



what. Girl is not so good as others. Action 
is slower, story not so interesting. Maybe 
that's the trouble. Got over pretty well with 
the Mix fans. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw general class in city of 16,000. Ad- 
mission 30-40. Ben. L. Morris, Temple Thea- 
tre (1,000 seats), Bellaire, Ohio. 

MONA VANNAu (9 reels). Star cast. Not 
fit for a theatre unless your audience like 
mob stuff and plenty of it. Not suitable for 
Sunday. Had poor attendance. Draw high 
class. Admission 20-30-40. Louis Isenberg, 
Elmwood Theatre (1,600 seats), Buffalo, New 
York. 

MONTE CRISTO. (8 reels). Star, John Gil- 
bert. Here is a picture that is no good for 
a small town. Good acting but didn't draw 
or please here. Paid too much for it. Suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw all classes in town 
of 1,000. Admission 10-15. A. E 1 . Rogers, 
Temple Theatre (240 seats), Dexter, New 
York. 

NO MOTHER TO GUIDE HER. (7,000 feet). 
Star, Genevieve Tobin. Very good picture. 
Go after this one. Boost it to the limit. You 
can't go wrong on it. Packed them in on 
this one. Everyone satisfied. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. David Hirsch, Forrest 
Theatre (500 seats), Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

NO MOTHER TO GUIDE HER. (7,000 feet). 
Star cast. Another one of the so-called Fox 
specials which are only fair program pic- 
tures. A cast that no one knows anything 
about and a title that would make anyone 
stay away. Suitable for Sunday only. Town 
of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy 
Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma.. 

NORTH OF HUDSON BAY. Star, Tom Mix. 
Mix fans thought this one great, but too 
many dumb mistakes in it that are notice- 
able to be a Mix picture. Moral tone good and 
it is suitabl efor Sunday. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw all classes in town of 2,800. Ad- 
mission 15-25. D. W. Strayer, Mt. Joy Thea- 
tre (250 seats), Mt. Joy, Pennsylvania. 

NORTH OF HUDSON BAY. Star, Tom Mix. 
Fair satisfaction. Advertised It as a special 



and it proved to be just an ordinary pro- 
gram picture. Last reel poorly connected: 
patrons asked if part of the picture had not 
been cut out of the reels we showed. Moral 
tone good. Had good attendance. Draw small 
town and country class in town of 2,245. Ad- 
mission 10-25. W. J. Powell, Lonet Theatre 
(299 seats), Wellington, Ohio. 

NOT A DRUM WAS HEARD. (4,823 feet). 
Star, Charles "Buck" Jones. One more of 
Fox's cheap pictures. Nothing to it. Not even 
a title. Nobody liked it. Not suitable for 
Sunday. Had fair attendance. Town of 2,- 
500. Admission 10-35. I. M. Hlrshblond, Traco 
Theatre, Toms River, New Jersey. 

NOT A DRUM WAS HEARD. (4,823 feet). 
Star, Charles "Buck" Jones. I can't see any- 
thing to this one. Seems like Jones' pictures 
gets worse every time. Nothing to it. Town of 
1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy 
Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

SIX CYLINDER LOVE. (7 reels). Star, 
Ernest Truex. A delightful comedy which for 
some reason or other fell down here. Can't 
explain it, it's well acted, by some of the 
original stage cast, and is all a fine comedy 
should be. It was a financial flop here, on a 
night with no opposition. Usual advertising 
brought poor attendance. Draw health seek- 
ers and tourists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac 
Theatre Beautiful, Saranac Lake, New York. 

SKID PROOF. (5,565 feet). Star, Charles 
Jones. A good program picture where Jones 
is liked but my patrons want to see him in 
westerns. This picture doesn't give him any- 
chance. Playing him out of luck up to the 
finish. Moral tone O. K. and it is O. K. for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw miners 
and business class in town of 1,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25. Lee Dillingham, Kozy Theatre 
(200 seats), Nortonville, Kentucky. 

SOFT BOILED. (7,054 feet). Star, Tom 
Mix. Very good picture, but Mix out of his 
class. Will please at that. Advertising possi- 
bilities extra good. Moral tone fine and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Had very good at- 
tendance. Draw best class. W. C. Mclntire. 
Rose Theatre, Burlington, North Carolina. 

SOFT BOILED. (7,054 feet). Star, Tom Mix. 
In my opinion a good picture in any theatre, 
but somehow it did not draw as much as It 
should have. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
farmers in town of 2,500. Admission 10-20, 
10-25. H. J. Longaker, Howard Theatre (350 
seats, Alexandria, Minnesota. 

ST. ELMO. (6 reels). Star, John Gilbert. 
A good picture. John Gilbert a wonderful 
actor but he has no following here. Town 
of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy 
Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

STEPPING FAST. (4,608 feet). Star, Tom 
Mix. Scenario called for first two reels to 
kill off Tom's elderly pal, his mother and 
his fine dog in order to get Tom good and 
mad. That lowered it out of class 1 in my 
estimation. I thought the best part was 
some wild and woolly auto driving that Tom 
does. Moral tone rough and it is not suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw rural class in town of 400. Admission 
25-30. E. L. Partridge, Pyam Theatre (240 
seats), Kinsman, Ohio. 



Released May 25, 1924— Booking 
Reservations Now 



COM1XU 





YQlfeBREA 

an Al Christie Feature ~ivtfh 

Dorothy Devore 

Walter Hiers , Tully Marshall, 
Jimmie Adams Priscilla Bonner 
and Jimmie HaiTison 

HODKINSON RELEASE 

Season 1924-1925 Thirty First-Pun Pictures 



62 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



THREE JUMPS AHEAD. (4,854 feet). Star, 
Tom Mix. A very good Mix western. The 
leap over the chasm with Tony is a bird. 
Moral tone okay but is pretty strenuous for 
Sunday. Had extra good attendance. Draw 
rural class in town of 400. Admission 25-30. 
E. L Partridge, Pyam Theatre (240 seats), 
Kinsman, Ohio. 

WOLF MAN. (5,145 feet). Star, John 
Gilbert. Never in all my life such a brutal 
man as this Gilbert in this picture. When 
a man loses respect for a lady, as he does 
In this picture, he certainly must be a wolf, 
not a man. If I had my way I would for- 
ever bar him from the screen. This picture 
has killed him in my house forever and ever- 
more. He is too important for me. W. Odom, 
Dixie Theatre, Durant, Mississippi. 

Goldwyn 

BROKEN CHAINS. (6,190 feet). Star cast. 
Pleased ninety-five per cent. A splendid out- 
door story. Cast and photography above 
average. A north woods story that will 
please. Moral tone fair and it is suitable 
for 'Sunday. Had poor attendance. R. K. 
Russell, Legion Theatre, Cushing, Iowa. 

BROTHERS UNDER THE SKIN. (4,983 
feet. Star cast. A fair program picture, 
that's ail. Print in good condition. Seemed 
to please. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw student and educated class in town 
of 2,000. Admission 10-25 regular, special 
15-35. K. F. Van Norman, Star Theatre (350 
seats), Mansfield, Pennsylvania. 

COME ON OVER. (5,556 feet). Star, Col- 
leen Moore. A very enjoyable picture and 
pleased all. Goldwyn does not overcharge 
and prints are good. Had good attendance. 
Draw all classes in town of 1,800. Admis- 
sion 15-20. J. Neal Lonigan, Colonial The- 
atre (450 seats), Moulton, Iowa. 

DAY OF FAITH. (6,577 feet). Star, El- 
eanor Boardman. Might be classed as bur- 
lesque on "Miracle Man." Moral tone fair 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw high class. Admission 20- 
30-40. Louis Isenberg, Blmwood Theatre 
(1,600 seats), Buffalo, New York. 

ENEMIES OF WOMEN. (10,901 feet). 
Star cast. A truly wonderful picture which 
will please only the best class. Town of 
1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy 
Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

ENEMIES OF WOMEN. (10,901 feet). 
Star, Lionel Barrymore. This picture is not 
suitable for the small town and will not 
please a very big per cent. European set- 
tings do not go well in small towns. Good 
acting on part of Barrymore. Not suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
all types in town of 1,500. Admission 10-22. 
C. Ernest Liggett, Liggett Theatre (600 
seats), Madison, Kansas. 

ENEMIES OF WOMEN. (10,901 feet). 
Star, Lionel Barrymore. Good feature picture. 
Intelligent audiences will appreciate this. A 
worthy feature. Moral tone O. K. Had 
good attendance. Draw all classes in town 
of 4,000. Admission 10-20-30. C. T. Meis- 
burg, Harrodsburg Opera House (600 seats), 
Harrodsburg, Kentucky. 




AGNES AYRES 

One of the principals in Associated Ex- 
hibitors' release, "When a Girl Loves." 



FIRES OF YOUTH. (5,000 feet). Star 
cast. What a lemon! No plot, no stars, no 
nothing. If I hadn't run it as part of a 
double feature program, I would have got 
mobbed. Don't run it, If you get it for 
nothing. Talk about the scandal in Wash- 
ington. They haven't anything on the guy 
who sold me this picture. Moral tone all 
right. It never is suitable for Sunday. Diaw 
mixed class in town of 4.OC0. Admission 10- 
25-35. Thomas L. Barnett, Finn's Theatre 
(600 seats), Jewett City, Connecticut. 

HEADLESS HORSEMAN. (6,000 feet). Star. 
Will Rogers. Nothing to it. Many walked 
out. Such pictures will kill any theatre. 
Moral tone okay and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had poor attendance. Draw local class 
in town of 500. Admission 15-25. M. R. 
Herring, Community Theatre (200 seats), 
Winton, North Carolina. 

HOLD YOUR HORSES. (5 reels). Star, 
Tom Moore. Good, entertaining comedy 
drama that pleased. Good moral tone, suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw all town and country 
classes. Admission 20-40. Ernest D. Gruppe, 
Fausto Theatre, Isle of Pines, West Indies. 

IN THE PALACE OF THE KING. (9,000 
feet)- Star cast. A waste of good film had 
to wake up the ushers after the last show. 
The audience did not have to stay. Draw all 
classes in suburban town. Admission 10-20. 
C. H. Douglass, Realart Theatre (500 seats), 
Los Angeles, California. 

IN THE PALACE OF THE KING. (9,000 
feet). Star, Blanche Sweet. A picture with 
big sets that cost a lot of money and that 
wasn't worth it. Not liked here, and my 
personal opinion irrespective of box office 



results, a very mediocre offering from an 
entertainment standpoint. You'll do well on 
this to escape a loss, if you play It. Usual 
advertising. Attendance, couldn't describe 
it. Draw health seekers and tourists. Dave 
Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, Saranac 
Lake, New York. 

LAST MOMENT. (6 reels). Star, Henry 
Hull. Excellent sea story with an improbable 
plot that pleased a majority. Starts off with 
a good deal of humor and then settles into 
a sequence of events that will glue your 
audience to their seats. Heard a few kicks, 
but you'll hear that nearlv any time. Boys, 
play this as a program picture with a couple 
good short subjects and you will satisfy 
one hundred per cent. Moral tone O. K. Not 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw general class In town of 1.000. Ad- 
mission 10-25. 15-35. H. H. Hedberg, Amuse-U 
Theatre, Melville, Louisiana. 

LITTLE OLD NEW YORK. (10.000 feet). 
Star. Marion Davies. A little too long. A 
wonderful picture. The best of Its kind we 
have run. Buy it right and boost It. Moral 
tone okay and it is suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw all classes In 
town of 2.000. Admission 10-20. Henry 
Grelfe, Opera House (450 seats), Windsor, 
Missouri. 

LITTLE OLD NEW YORK. (10,000 feet). 
Star, Marion Davies. One of the best we 
ever played. Capacity business in the big 
house all week. Moral tone okay. Had won- 
derful attendance. J. J. Spandan, Family 
Theatre, Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

LITTLE OLD NEW YORK. (10,000 feet). 
Star, Marion Davies. A wonderful picture 
that will please one hundred per cent, and 
get some real money. Best picture Marion 
Davies ever made. Town of 1,500. Admis- 
sion 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 
seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

LITTLE OLD NEW YORK. (10,000 feet). 
Star, Marlon Davies. Very well liked pic- 
ture. Business fair. Town of 5,000. Admis- 
sion 10-20. Fredonla Opera House, Fredonia, 
New York. 

LITTLE OLD NEW YORK. (10.000 feet). 
Star. Marion Davies. No one can go wrong 
on this one. It's great. Packed them in for 
three days' run. Moral tone good and it Is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw better class in town of 3,900. Admis- 
sion thirty cents. Joseph Angros, Palace 
Theatre (440 seats), Leechburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

LOOK YOUR BEST. (6 reels). Star. Col- 
leen Moore. A good star in an awful poor 
picture. Tried to make a comedy in five 
reels but fell flat. Foreign stuff don't go 
here. Draw all classes in town of 1,000. Ad- 
mission 10-15. A. E. Rogers .Temple Thea- 
tre (240 seats), Dexter, New York. 

LOST AND FOUND. Star, House Peters. 
A good average program offering with action 
galore. A South Sea story with some beau- 
tiful ocean scenes and a thrilling fight be- 
tween two native tribes. Worth booking. 
Moral tone okay and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had large attendance. Draw mixed 
class in town of 4,000. Admission 10-25-35. 
Thomas L. Barnett, Finn's Theatre (600 
seats), Jewett City, Connecticut. 

LOST AND FOUND. Star cast. A very 
clever picture. Beautiful exteriors and very 
well acted. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good atetndance. 
Draw all classes in town of 850. Admission 
15-30. J. J. Mahowald, Alhambra Theatre 
(250 seats), Garrison, North Dakota. 

LOST AND FOUND. Star cast. As pretty 
a picture as one would want to see. En- 
joyed by everyone present. Don't be afraid 
of it. Moral tone good but it is not suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
all classes in town of 2,800. Admission 15- 
25. D. W. Strayer, Mt. Joy Theatre, Mt. Joy, 
Pennsylvania. 

LOVE PIKER. (6,237 feet). Star, Anita 
Stewart. Certainly an audience picture. 
Clean and cleverly produced. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw farming class in town of 
600. Admission 15-25. C. C. Kluts, Glades 
Theatre (200 seats), Moore Haven, Florida. 

RAGGED EDGE. (6,800 feet). Star, Alfred 
Lunt. A very nice program picture that 
pleased at least ninety per cent of a fair 
sized audience. Not the big special Goldwyn 




May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



63 



claims it to be but a picture that will please 
the average movie fan if prices are not 
boosted. Good photography and acting and 
every foot of the film was there. It was 
clean, too. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
mixed class in town of 1,000. Admission 
10-25, 15-35. H. H. Hedberg, Amuse-U Thea- 
tre (200 seats), Melville, Louisiana. 

NAME THE MAN. (8 reels). Star, Mae 
Busch. Wonderful acting and splendid cast 
but too sad for the average audience. Moral 
tone fair and it is doubtful for Sunday. 
Draw all classes in town of 7,000. Admis- 
sion 10-35. R. J. M. Leon, Palace Theatre 
(220 seats), Washington Court House, Ohio. 

NAME THE MAN. (8 reels). Star, Conrad 
Nagel. Great picture. Don't be afraid to 
get behind this one. Drew very good here. 
You can't go wrong on this one. Moral tone 
good. Had big attendance. Draw better 
class in town of 3,900. Admission thirty 
cents. Joseph Angros, Palace Theatre (440 
seats), Leechburg, Pennsylvania. 

NAME THE MAN. (8 reels). Star cast. 
A picture from the acting standpoint, direc- 
tion and production is positively flawless; 
picture that "fell down" here frightfully, 
and, strange to say, a picture with which a 
lot of fault was found. I don't know how 
to explain this, unless it's the story; It's 
sombre; the girl has no end of trouble and 
the picture is not relieved at any time with 
comedy touches. This picture should go 
well in the cities; still this is merely my 
opinion, as I have known it to do disap- 
pointing business in important cities; the 
small towns better look out. It did not go 
over here, despite a wealth of advertising 
which resulted in good attendance the first 
day and the second day patronage was nil. 
The small town exhibitor should give this 
careful thought before he buys this. If he 
don't he encounter a fine deficit. I just about 
broke even on a picture that I had boosted 
for a month, so draw your own conclusions. 
Used everything for advertising. Had good 
attendance first day, poor second day. Draw 
health seekers and tourists. Dave Seymour, 
Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, Saranac Lake, 
New York. 

RED LIGHTS. (6,841 feet). Star cast. 
The best mystery picture ever shown in this 
theatre. Splendid paper and intriguing title. 
Splendid small town picture. Patrons went 
out talking. Would have justified a two- 
night play. Moral tone good. Had fine at- 
tendance. Draw small town and country 
class in town of 2,245. Admission 10-26. 
W. J. Powell, Lonet Theatre (299 seats), 
Wellington, Ohio. 

RENO. (7 reels). Star cast. A most 
amusing farce. Well received by patrons. 
Draw mixed class in town of 1,900. Admis- 
sion varies. L G. Roesner, Colonial Theatre 
(800 seats), Winona, Minnesota. 

RENO. (7 reels). Star, Helene Chadwick. 
A well gowned and produced picture, and 
also one that my patrons knocked a lot on 
account of its story, which they claimed was 
an information bureau on "the divorce ques- 
tion," all of which is true. It's very ques- 
tionable if this is entertainment. Usual ad- 
vertising brought good Saturday attendance. 
Draw health seekers and tourists. Dave 
Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, Saranac 
Lake, New York. 

SIX DAYS. (8,010 feet). Star, Milton Sills. 
People seemed to like same but laughed 
throughout. Overdrawn; too much love- 
making. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
student and educated class in town of 2,000. 
Admission 10-25 regular, special 15-35. K. F. 
Van Norman, Star Theatre (350 seats), Mans- 
field, Pennsylvania. 

SIX DAYS. (8,010 feet). Star cast. Good. 
Used Elinor Glyn's name and drew them in. 
Not a big picture but will satisfy. Moral 
tone okay and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw better class in town 
of 3,900. Admission thirty cents. Joseph 
Angros, Palace Theatre (440 seats), Leech- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

SLAVE OF DESIRE. (7 reels). Star, 
George Walsh. Certainly not an audience 
picture. Fell flat here. Town of 1,500. Ad- 
mission 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy Theatre 
(600 seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

SPOILERS. (8,028 feet). Star, Milton 
Sills. A very fine picture but not in best of 



Every Report Helps 



condition. Was well liked by all who made 
comment. Moral tone good but it is not suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
student and educated class in town of 2,000. 
Admission 10-25 regular, special 15-25. K. F. 
Van Norman, Star Theatre (350 seats), Mans- 
field, Pennsylvania. 

SPOILERS. (8,028 feet). Star cast. A 
real picture, in my estimation. It is better 
than the old "Spoilers." A picture you can 
really boost. Town of 1,500. Admission 10- 
25. Jake Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 seats), 
Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

STEADFAST HEART. (7 reels). Star, 
Marguerite Courtot. A fairly good picture 
which dragged a bit at the opening but 
gradually speeded up. Heard quite a few 
good comments and no poor ones, so it must 
have satisfied. Moral tone okay and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw mixed class in town of 4,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25-35. Thomas L. Barnett, Finn's 
Theatre (600 seats), Jewett City, Con- 
necticut. 

STRANGER'S BANQUET. (8,531 feet). 
Star cast. A bunch of nothing. No crowd, 
and glad of it. This kind hurts business. 
Moral tone good and is suitable for Sunday. 
Had poor attendance. Draw all classes in 
town of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Miss Doug- 
las Robertson, Princess Theatre (200 seats), 
Flemingsburg, Kentucky. 

THROUGH THE DARK. (7,999 feet). Star, 
Colleen Moore. A thrill picture. You'll go 
through a maze of gripping, compelling sit- 
uations in a "Boston Blackie" story. William 
Noble, Empress Theatre, Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma. 

UNDER THE RED ROBE. (12,000 feet). 
Star, Alma Rubens. A distinct box office 
flop here, and it was not unexpected; this 
was one of the very few pictures I bought 
and did not know exactly its true worth or 
near it. Nothing in this means a thing at 
the box office, and the longer you run it the 
worse your business will become; it simply 
isn't. It shows cost of production, but it 
takes more than money to make a picture. 
Advise small town exhibitors to not play 
this under any circumstances; you can't get 
your operating expense out of it. Used 
everything for advertising. Attendance 
putrid. Draw health seekers and tourists. 
Dave Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, 
Saranac Lake, New York. 

Hodkinson 

AT SIGN OF JACK O' LANTERN. (5,193 
feet). Star cast. This could have been made 
into a fair program picture but failed as 
anything. Moral tone fair and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had poor attendance,. Draw all 
classes in town of 4,000. Admission 10-20. 
F. A. Brown, Amuse-U Theatre (300 seats), 
Frederick, Oklahoma. 



MAN FROM GLENGARRY. (5,800 feet). 
Star cast. A pretty fair picture of Its kind. 
Nothing extra. Has lots of action, but that 
is about all. Suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw working class In 
city of 13,000. Admission 10-20. G. M. Bert- 
ling, Favorite Theatre (187 seats), Piqua, 
Ohio. 

MARRIED PEOPLE. (5,200 feet). Star. 
Mabel Ballin. Not a knockout by any means 
but it pleased a majority. Plot threadbare 
and treatment brought out nothing new. 
Moral tone O. K. and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Had average attendance. Draw 
neighborhood class in city of 80,000. Ad- 
mission 10-15. M. F. Meade, Olive Theatre 
(450 seats), St. Joseph, Missouri. 

MYSTERIOUS RIDER. (6 reels). Star, 
Claire Adams. Old picture but film in good 
condition. Pleased entire audience, so can't 
kick about age of film. Paper not good for 
Saturday night advertising. Too tame to suit 
picture. Moral tone fair, but It is not suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
mixed class in town of 1,000. Admission 
10-25, 15-35. H. H. Hedberg, Amuse-U Thea- 
tre (200 seats), Melville, Louisiana. 

Metro 

ALL THE BROTHERS WERE VALIANT. 

(6,265 feet). Star cast. Prints and pictures 
that are as good as this make it a pleasure 
to be our own projectionists. Highly pleased 
with this one. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw farmers and lumbermen in town of 
625. Admission 10-25. Benson and Landman, 
Town Hall Theatre (500 seats), South Lon- 
donderry, Vermont. 

ALL THE BROTHERS WERE VALIANT. 

(6,265 feet). Star cast. While this one only 
brought average attendance those that saw 
it thought it a very good picture. It's above 
the average in picture value. City of 110,000. 
Admission 10-20. Al. C. Werner, Royal Thea- 
tre, Reading, Pennsylvania. 

AN OLD SWEETHEART OF MINE. (5,400 
feet). Star cast. Slow and a rather weak 
story. My people did not care for it. City of 
110,000. Admission 10-20. Al. C. Werner. 
Royal Theatre, Reading, Pennsylvania. 

BOY OF FLANDERS. (7,018 feet). Star, 
Jackie Coogan. A much better picture from 
our audience point of view than was "Long 
Live the King." This picture is an audience 
picture from start to finish and any house 
that plays it is justified in expecting good 
business which we did not get for some 
unknown reason. I'll give it up, I do not 
know what they want, but we are not getting 
in our regular patronage and nothing we 
offer gets a response that means money laid 
by. Arthur E. Hancock, Columbia Theatre, 
Columbia City, Indiana. 

BROADWAY ROSE. (7,277 feet). Star. 
Mae Murray. A good picture. Moral tone 
fair, but it is not suitable for Sunday. At- 
tendance, weak. Draw all classes in town of 
2,000. Admission 10-30. H. Loyd, Colonial 
Theatre (400 seats), Post, Texas. 

CHORUS GIRL'S ROMANCE. (6,000 feet). 



Released July 13, 1924— Booking 
Reservations Now 




u 



wr\s ijf 

mmmon 



HODKINSON 
RELEASE 

Season I92M925 
Thirty' Krsl Run Returns 




64 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Star, Viola Dana. Very good program, 
amusing and entertaining. Moral tone good. 
Draw Americans and Cubans. Admission 
20-40. Ernest D. Gruppe, Fausto Theatre 
(200 seats), Santa Fe, Isle of Pines, West 
Indies. 

DESIRE:. (6,500 feet). Star cast. Good 
program picture. Marguerite De LaMotte is 
worthy of a better role. Picture fairly well 
liked. Moral tone O. K. and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had average attendance. Draw 
general class in city of 23,000. Admission 
18-35. Frank Franer, Rialto Theatre, New 
London, Connecticut. 

ETERNAL, STRUGGLE. (7,374 feet). Star 
cast. One of the best for a mining camp; 
just the kind that will please the miners. 
They don't like society stuff. This doesn't 
have any. All action. Had good attendance. 
Good for any house where they like action. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Draw miners. C. M. Lane, Big Sandy 
Theatre (200 seats), Big Sandy, West Vir- 
ginia. 

FASHION ROW. (7,300 feet). Star, Mae 
Murray. Different, fiery. Exciting. An ex- 
cellent picture. William Noble, Rialto The- 
atre, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

FTGHTIN' MAD. (5,436 feet). Star, Will- 
iam Desmond. Better than many specials 
and Metro don't hold you up. Best western 
I have run for some time. Moral tone okay 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw rural class in town of 360. 
Admission 10-25. E. L Delano, Electric The- 
atre (200 seats), Agra, Kansas. 

FRENCH DOLL, (7,028 feet). Star, Mae 
Murray. Absolutely nothing to this picture 
and the worst Mae Murray has ever made. 
Another one like this one and Mae Murray 
will be done for. Town of 1,500. Admis- 
sion 10-25. Jae Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 
seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

HEART BANDIT. (4,900 feet). Star, 
Viola Dana. A fairly good program picture. 
Milton Sills helps to put this picture over. 
It is just a little better than a good many. 
Moral tone good but not suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Town of 2,500. 
Admission 10-35. I. M. Hirshblond, Traco 
Theatre, Toms River, New Jersey. 

HELD TO ANSWER. (5,601 feet). Star. 
House Peters. Good picture, but little too 
serious for present day fan. You won't re- 
gret it. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had poor attendance. Draw 
railroad class in town of 2,705. Admission 
10-25. 15-30. W. C. Witt. Strand Theatre (450 
seats), Irvine, Kentucky. 

OIIR HOSPITALITY. (6.220 feet). Star, 
Buster Keaton. Got by fairly well. It's a 
clever comedy but does not create a great 
deal of laughter. Many liked it, others did 
not. Not a very attractive offering as a 
feature. Moral tone okay and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had average attendance. Draw 
all classes in city of 14,000. Admission 10- 
25, 10-35. E. W. Collins, Grand Theatre (700 
seats), Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

OUR HOSPITALITY. (6,220 feet). Star, 
Buster Keaton. No matter whether this 
comedy has received knocks or not, this pic- 
ture pleased them exceedingly and was 
voted about as good as any of the Keaton 



Send Every Week 



product. I agree with the opinion of my 
patrons on this one. Usual advertising 
brought good attendance. Draw health 
seekers and tourists. Dave Seymour, Pontlac 
Theatre Beautiful, Saranac Lake. New York. 

PEG O' MY HEART. (7,800 feet). Star, 
Laurette Taylor. A little old but drew a lot 
better than some of the new ones. This 
pleased everyone. All Metro prints we have 
received are in good shape. Draw all classes 
in town of 1,800. Admission 15-20. 15-25. 
J. Neal Lonigan, Colonial Theatre (450 seats), 
Moulton, Iowa. 

PLEASURE MAD. (7,547 feet). Star cast. 
Had more good comments on this picture 
than anything we have shown In many 
weeks. Was the talk of the town. A pic- 
ture that will please the whole family. Town 
of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake Jones, Cozy 
Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

aUINCY ADAMS SAWYER. (7,000 feet). 
Star cast. Did well on this one and every- 
one liked it. Metro has never given me a 
poor print, which means a lot. Moral tone 
okay and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw rural class in town 
of 3,600. Admission 10-25. E. L Delano, 
Electric Theatre (200 seats), Agra, Kansas. 

SCARAMOUCHE. (9,600 feet). Star, Ramon 
Navarro. Best picture we have shown this 
year. Book this one and boost it for all you 
are worth, and don't be afraid to raise the 
price. This is absolutely everything they 
say it is. Moral tone okay and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Jake Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 
seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

STRANGERS OF THE NIGHT. (8,000 feet). 
Star cast. Barely misses being a big special. 
Pleases most any audience. Moral tone okay 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw railroad class in town of 
2,705. Admission 10-25, 15-30. W. C. Witt, 
Strand Theatre (450 seats), Irvine, Kentucky. 

STRANGERS OF THE NIGHT. (8,000 feet). 
Star cast. A good mystery picture that 
pleased immensely but business kind of poor. 
Moral tone okay and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had poor attendance. Draw mixed 
class in town of 3,000. Admission 10-20. 
Charles Martin, Family Theatre (300 seats), 
Mt. Morris, New York. 

THY NAME IS WOMAN. (9.087 feet). Star. 
Barbara LaMarr. An excellent picture, full 
of human interest. Acting of Miss LaMarr 
exceedingly interesting and absorbing. A 
good picture to book. William Noble, Em- 
press Theatre, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

TOLL OF THE SEA. (4,600 feet). Star, 
Kenneth Harlan. A beautiful natural color 
picture. Story will please all who see it. 
My patrons were well pleased. Suitable for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw vari- 
ous classes in town of 2,100. Admission 5- 
10-15. A. S. Carlos, Bijou Theatre (350 
seats), Jeanerette, Louisiana. 

TRIP TO PARADISE. (5,800 feet). Star, 
Bert Lytel. A good picture, fairly well 



acted. Seemed to please everybody present. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw all classes 
in town of 850. Admission 15-30. J. J. 
Mahowald, Alhambra Theatre (250 seats), 
Garrison, North Dakota. 

YOUR FRIEND AND MINE. (5,750 feet). 
Star, Enid Bennett. Good picture of domes- 
tic strife. Very good moral and some good 
scenes. Attendance not so good on account 
of rain. Draw all classes in town of 1,800. 
Admission 15-20, 15-25. J. Neal Lonigan, Co- 
lonial Theatre (450 seats), Moulton, Iowa. 

YOUTH TO YOUTH. (6,900 feet). Star, 
Blllie Dove. Just fair. Nothing more. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw all classes 
in town of 850. Admission 15-30. J. J. 
Mahowald, Alhambra Theatre (250 seats). 
Garrison, North Dakota. 

Paramount 

ACROSS CONTINENT. (5,481 feet). 
WORLD'S CHAMPION. Star, Wallace Reid. 
One is as good an auto race as the other 
is a boxing match. Both were well liked. 
Wally was sure a good one. Moral tone good 
and it is fairly suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance for both. Draw small town 
and country class in town of 735. Admission 
10-25. Helen Drexler. Star Theatre (190 
seats), Crafton, Nebraska. 

BACHELOR DADDY. (6,229 feet). Star. 
Thomas Meighan. A one hundred per cent 
picture. Pleased all who saw it. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Miss Douglas Robertson, Prin- 
cess Theatre (200 seats), Flemingsburg. 
Kentucky. 

BEYOND THE ROCKS. (6,740 feet). Star. 
Gloria Swanson. Tliese stars, Rudolph Val- 
entino and Gloria Swanson, did very good 
and were very well received by our patrons 
here. A good picture. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw .s.i, all town and country class in 
town of 735. Admission 10-25. Helen Drex- 
ler, Star Theatre (190 seats), Crafton, Ne- 
braska. 

BIG BROTHER. (7,080 feet). Star, Tom 
Moore. This is by far the best feature the 
Paramount Company has released this year. 
Will please any audience. Moral tone fine 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had big at- 
tendance. Draw all classes in suburban 
town. Admission 10-20. C. H. Douglass, 
Realart Theatre (500 seats), Los Angeles, 
California, 

BI.l 'EREARD'S EIGHTH WIFE. (5,960 

feet). Star, Gloria Swanson. This is a good 
picture. The title is the drawing card as 
well as Gloria's name. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw mixed class in town of 2,500. 
Admission 10-25. J. H. Watts, Scotland Thea- 
tre (600 seats), Laurinburg, North Carolina. 

BLUEBEARD'S EIGHTH WIFE, (5,960 
feet). Star, Gloria Swanson. Very fine pic- 
ture for any exhibitor to buy and boost. My 
patrons liked it very .nuch. Moral tone good. 
Had fair attendance. Drew town and rural 
class in town of 3,000. Admission 10-25. S. 
H. Rich, Rich Theatre (480 seats), Mont- 
pelier, Idaho. 

CALL OF THE NORTH. (4,823 feet). Star. 
Madge Bellamy. Weak northwestern; "theme" 
seems to suit Holt "admirably." Nothing to 
it. Photography beautiful. Print with a few 
"cut-outs." Moral tone O. K. and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
farm and oil class in town of 508. J. A. 
Herring, Play House Theatre (249 seats), 
Strong, Arkansas. 

CHEAT. (6,323 feet). Star, Pola Negri. 
Splendid production. Should satisfy any 
audience. Moral tone fine and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fine attendance. Draw 
rural class In town of 250. Admission 15-25- 
35. J. J. Halley, San Andreas Theatre (110 
seats), San Andreas, California. 

COWBOY AND THE LADY. (4,900 f 
Star, Tom Moore. Good co.Tiedy and western 
picture. Pleased all classes. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw town and country class in 
town of 800. Admission 10-30. Chas. L 
Nott, Opera House (400 seats), Sutherland, 
Iowa. 

CRIISE OF THE sim;i:.I ACKS. (Para- 
mount). Be sure and play this if you want 



First Release July 20, 1924— Booking 
Reservations Now 




HER OWN 
FREE WILL 

Storting 

HeiineChadwick 

L). HODKINSON Season 1924-1925 
J RELEASE Thirty First-Run Pictures 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



65 



to give your patrons a treat. We played it 
in two parts and everybody liked it. Town 
of 2,500. Admission 10-35, I. M. Hirshblond, 
Traco Theatre, Toms River, New Jersey. 

DONT CALL IT LOVE. (6,457 feet). Star 
cast. This may be a good picture, but neither 
I nor my people could see it that way. Nita 
Naldi's gowns were criticized rather severely. 
Paper is good. Had good attendance. Draw 
all classes In small town. Admission 10-33. 
M. W. Larraour, National Theatre (450 seats), 
Graham, Texas. 

DONT CALL IT LOVE, (6,457 feet). Star 
cast. This will please about fifty-fifty. Per- 
sonally thought it was a pretty good picture. 
While it does not contain blood and thun- 
der, or flappers, there are parts of it that 
are very good. Subtitles very good and will 
get a laugh. Nita Naldi very good. The act- 
ing of Rod LaRocque deserves special men- 
tion. Regular advertising to fair attend- 
ance. Moral tone good and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Draw best class in the world, vet- 
erans of the World War in town of 600. Ad- 
mission 15-30. Adolph Schutz, Fort Bayard 
Theatre (300 seats). Fort Bayard, New 
Mexico. 

DON'T TELL EVERYTHING. (5 reels). 
Star, Wallace Reid. A picture that pleased 
everyone. Was old but in good condition, 
considering age. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw student and educated class in town of 
2,000. Admission 10-25 regular, special 15-35. 
K. F. Van Norman, Star Theatre (350 seats), 
Mansfield, Pennsylvania. 

EXCITERS. (5,939 feet). Star, Bebe 
Daniels. A very pleasing picture that drew 
good attendance and was liked by nearly 
every one. A very good program picture. 
Moral tone fair and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw farming 
class in town of 1,500. Admission 10-30. J. 
A. Harvey, Strand Theatre (280 seats), Vaca- 
ville, California. 

EXCITERS. (5,939 feet). Star, Bebe Dan- 
iels. A very interesting and pleasing pic- 
ture; not a special, but went over well. Drew 
well considering Lenten season in this nine- 
ty-nine per cent. Catholic town. Draw vari- 
ous classes in town of 2,100. Admission 5- 
10-15. A. S. Carlos, Bijou Theatre (50 seats), 
Jeanerette, Louisiana. 

EXPERIENCE. (7 reels). Star cast. All 
young people can learn a good lesson from 
this one. Very entertaining as well. Moral 
tone very good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had poor atttendance, though no fault 
of production. Draw small town and country 
class in town of 735. Admission 10-25. Helen 
Drexler, Star Theatre (190 seats), Crafton. 
Nebraska. 

FIGHTING COWARD. (6,501 feet). Star, 
Ernest Torrence. A comedy drama of the 
old south that is as good as they make them 
In every respect. Cullen Landis as the lad 
who cannot see the use of "fighting for a 
girl I already possess" is great. Ernest 
Torrence puts over one of his best charac- 
terizations. He is at his best in a semi- 
comic role. Made along the Mississippi River 
it is refreshing and original. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
big attendance. Draw general class in city 
of 16,000. Admission 30-40. Ben L Morris, 
Temple Theatre (1,000 seats), Bellaire, Ohio. 

FLAMING BARRIERS. (5.S21 feet). Star 
cast. Plenty of hokum, but pleased our 
audience. Had good attendance. Draw rail- 
road class in town of 2,705. Admission 10-25, 
15-30. W. C. Witt, Strand Theatre (450 
seats). Irvine, Kentucky. 

FLAMING BARRIERS. (5,821 feet). Star, 
Jacqueline Logan. An ordinary picture, with 
a forest fire scene not nearly as well done 
as many that preceded it. When I say 
ordinary, that should largely govern your 
purchase price. Usual attendance brought 
fair attendance. Draw health seekers and 
tourists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac Theatre 
Beautiful, Saranao Lake, New York. 

FLAMING BARRIERS.! (5,821 feet). Star 
cast. Not so much. While this ought to get 
by, the story dragged. Forest fire very good. 
Was not overdone. A critical audience could 
pick very bad flaws in this. Taken as a 
whole, it will please where the audience 
wants only to pass the time away. Regular 
advertising to fair attendance. Good moral 
tone and it is suitable for Sunday. Draw 
best class in the world, veterans of the 



Send Tips on 
Everything 



World War, in town of 600. Admission 15- 
30. Adolph Schutz, Fort Bayard Theatre 
(300 seats), Fort Bayard, New Mexico. 

FRONTIER OF THE STARS. (5 reels). 
Star, Thomas Meighan. Very good. Good, 
moral and clean picture, made us money. 
Had average atendance. Town of 400. Ad- 
mission 15-25. F. M. Croop, Crescent Theatre 
(200 seats), Leonardsville, New York. 

HUMMING BIRD. (7,577 feet). Star, Gloria 
Swanson. Our patrons liked it very well. 
Many said Gloria's best. Star was very con- 
vincing and certainly got under the skin. 
Proved an excellent business getter. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for any day. 
Had very good attendance. Draw all classes 
in town of 3.000. Admission 10-25-30. J. J. 
Wood, Redding Theatre (789 seats), Redding, 
California. 

HUMMING BIRD. (7,577 feet). Star, Gloria 
Swanson. A very good picture that drew a 
good attendance and one that will please 
anywhere. It is the best we have run of 
this star and we have run all of them that 
were released during the last year. Moral 
tone O. K. and it is suitable for Sunday. 
Had very good attendance. Draw general 
class in town of 800. Admission 10-30. Frank 
G Leal. Leal Theatre (246 seats), Irvington. 
California. 

ICEBOUND. (6,471 feet). Star cast. The 
story is there and well told. Tt is a home 
story of icebound staid puritanical New Eng- 
land, and a picture that will appeal to the 
patrons, wherever shown. William Noble. 
Criterion Theatre, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

KICK IN. (7.074 feet). Star cast. I 
thought this to be a wonderful picture as 
well as several patrons did. but was sur- 
prised to hear some say, the worst ever. 
Moral tone good. Draw rural class in town 
of 850. Admission 10-25. 10-35. W. F. Hay- 
cock, Star Theatre, Callaway, Nebraska. 

LAWFUL LARCENY. (6,237 feet). Star, 
Hope Hampton. A very good picture of 
woman against woman. Everyone well sat- 
isfied. No business, but no fault of the pic- 
ture. Print good. Moral tone good. Suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw all classes in town 
of 2.800. Admission 15-25. D. W. Strayer, 
Mt. Joy Theatre, Mt. Joy, Pennsylvania. 

NEXT CORNER. (7,061 feet). Star, Con- 
way Tearle. A very mediocre picture. Draw 
mixed class in town of 1,900. Admission 
varies. L. G. Roesner, Colonial Theatre (800 
seats), Winona, Minnesota. 

PRODIGAL DAUGHTERS. (6,216 feet). 
Star, Gloria Swanson. Best Swanson I've 
had yet; good title, very entertaining from 
every angle; this is the kind of picture that 
takes with me. Patrons well pleased. Suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
various classes in town of 2,i00. Admission 
5-10-15. A. S. Carlos, Bijou Theatre (350 
seats), Jeanerette, Louisiana. 

SHADOWS OF PARIS. (6,549 feet). Star, 
Pola Negri. A picture exceptionally well 
done. Star does excellent work. Draw mixed 



class in town of 1,900. Admission varies. 
L. G. Roesner, Colonial Theatre (800 seats), 
Winona, Minnesota. 

SILENT PARTNER. (5,886 feet). Star 
cast. Good program picture; will satisfy 
average crowd. Moral tone okay and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw better class in town of 3,900. Admis- 
sion thirty cents. Joseph Angros, Palace 
Theatre (440 seats), Leechburg, Penn- 
sylvania. 

SPANISH DANCER. (8,434 feet). Star, 
Pola Negri. Here it a picture in which you 
can't go wrong. It certainly is wonderful. 
Pleased patrons and brought them back 
again to see it following day. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
very good attendance. David Hirsh, Forrest 
Theatre (500 seats). Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

TIGER'S CLAW. (5,297 feet). Star, Jack 
Holt. A waste of film. No box office pull 
or any entertainment value. Moral tone 
fair. Attendance off. Draw family and stu- 
dent class in town of 4,000. Admission 10- 
25. R. J. Relf, Star Theatre (600 seats), De- 
corah, Iowa. 

TO THE LADIES. (6,268 feet). Star cast. 
A very ordinary program picture without 
any box office qualities. Even with an elab- 
orate prologue feature, the picture gave poor 
satisfaction and fell down miserably. Moral 
tone okay and it is suitable for Sunday. 
Had very poor attendance. Draw best class 
in city of 80,000. Admission 25-40. J. F. 
Ostenstock, Colonial Theatre (2,000 seats), 
Allentown, Pennsylvania. 

WILD BILL HICKOK. (6,893 feet). Star, 
Bill Hart. With an old-fashioned single- 
shooter he killed fourteen men without re- 
loading and then "would give fifty dollars 

for another charge of powder." H ! Had 

fair attendance. Draw family and student 
class in town of 4,000. Admission 10-25. 
R. J. Relf, Star Theatre (600 seats), De- 
corah, Iowa. 

WOMAN WITH FOUR FACES. (5,700 
feet). Star, Betty Compson. A good pro- 
gram picture. A crook story that will please. 
Moral tone good but it is not suitable for 
Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw mixed 
class in town of 2,500. Admission 10-26. 
J. H. Watts, Scotland Theatre (600 seats), 
Laurinburg, North Carolina. 

ZAZ\. (7,076 feet). Star, Gloria Swan- 
son. Good production. Patrons liked this 
one. Moral tone fair and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw rural 
class in town of 250. Admission 15-25-35. 
J. J. Halley, San Andrews Theatre (110 
seats), San Andrews, California. 

Pathe 

DR. JACK. (4,700 feet). Star, Harold 
Lloyd. Not quite as good as Grandma's Boy, 
but drew well and we got a better price on 
it, so made some, instead of losing. Suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
small town class in town of 3,500. Admis- 
sion 20-35. P. L Vann, Opera House (800 
seats), Greenville, Alabama. 

WHY WORRY? (6 reels). Star Harold 
Lloyd. A genuine thriller of the highest 
type, and a picture guaranteed to drive away 
the blues. A picture guaranteed to cause 
you to laugh, even if you never laughed be- 
fore. William Noble, Capitol Theatre, Okla- 
homa City, Oklahoma. 




Announcing 



PatsyRuth Miller 

in a series of 
ELMER HARRIS 
Productions/Cr 

HODKINSON RELEASE 

Season 1924'19?5 Thirty Bret-Run Picftnvs 




66 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Preferred 

HERO. (6,800 feet). Star cast. A pretty 
good picture that pleased most of them. Did 
not draw, but people found no fault with 
the picture. Cast is unusually fine and no 
glaring weakness otherwise. Just a fair 
picture. Moral tone okay and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had poor attendance. Draw all 
classes in city of 14,000. Admission 10-25, 
10-35. E. W. Collins, Grand Theatre (700 
seats), Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

MOTHERS-IN-LAW. (6,729 feet). Star 
cast. A well made and pleasing little com- 
edy-drama that pleases the majority. Stands 
up pretty well. Don't pay much for it. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw all classes in city 
of 14,000. Admission 10-25, 10-35. E. W. 
Collins, Grand Theatre (700 seats), Jones- 
boro, Arkansas. 

POOR MEN'S WIVES. (6,963 feet). Star, 
Barbara LaMarr. A mighty good picture. 
My patrons were very well pleased. Suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
various classes in town of 2.100. Admis- 
sion 5-10-15. A. S. Carlos, Bijou Theatre 
(350 seats), Jeanerette, Louisiana. 

Selznick 

COMMON LAW. (8 reels). Star cast. 
Great picture: pleased almost one hundred 
per cent. We got behind this one and 
packed them in for three days solid. Tou 
can't go wrong on this one. Moral tone okay 
but it is not suitable for Sunday. Draw bet- 
ter class in town of 3,900. Admission thirty 
cents. Joseph Angros, Palace Theatre (440 
seats), Leechburg, Pennsylvania. 

COMMON LAW. (8 reels). Star, Corrinne 
Griffith. One of the best pictures ever shown 
in our town. We cannot say anything too 
good for it. Some of our patrons saw It 
three times, which proves it. Not suitable 
for Sunday. Had fine attendance. Draw 
small town class in town of 3,500. Admis- 
sion 20-35. P. L Vann, Opera House (800 
seats), Greenville, Alabama. 

MAN'S HOME. (6 reels). Star cast. Old 
and print bad; did not please as well as we 
expected. Suitable for Sunday. Had poor 
attendance. Draw small town class in town 
of 3,500. Admission 20-35. P. L. Vann. Op- 
era House (800 seats), Greenville, Alabama. 

United Artists 

GIRL, I LOVED. (7,100 feet). Star, 
Charles Ray. Did not please more than for- 
ty percent, of my patrons. A sad ending 
that sends them out dissatisfied and de- 
pressed. Played my comedy last to offset 
this. Many walked out, saying that they 
did not care to wait. Good cast and excel- 
lent acting. Moral tone good. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw small town and country 
class in town of 2,245. Admission 10-25. 
W. J. Powell, Lonet Theatre (299 seats), 
Wellington, Ohio. 

ORPHANS OP THE STORM. (13,400 feet). 
Stars, Gish Sisters. From every angle this 
one is a winner. Played picture in bad 
weather, but this had no effect. Every Grif- 
fith picture is better than the last, it seems. 
Moral tone very good. Suitable for Sunday. 
Had very good attendance. David Hirsh, 
Forrest Theatre (500 seats), Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

ROBIN HOOD. (10,000 feet). Star, Doug- 



We Welcome New 
Friends 



las Fairbanks. Fine production. They asked 
too much for it. The small town exhibitors 
cannot make anything on account of high 
rental. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 1,500. Admission 10-25. 
Miss Douglas Robertson, Princess Theatre 
(200 seats), Flemingsburg, Kentucky. 

ROSITA. (8,800 feet). Star, Mary Pick- 
ford. Immensely pleased. The Pickford 
fans thought it the best ever, but it failed 
to draw the usual Pickford following on ac- 
count of the Lenten period. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had poor at- 
tendance. Draw miners. Admission 15-25. 
Charles F. Kear, Opera House (450 seats), 
Minersville, Pennsylvania. 

WHITE ROSE. (11 reels). Star, Mae 
Marsh. A picture which pleased the men 
and which the women dearly loved. Do not 
remember Mae Marsh ever being better cast 
or more humanly appealing. Drew patron- 
age from every class of life and pleased. An 
excellent picture to quiet censorship or Sun- 
day closing talk. Had good attendance. Draw 
all classes in town of 3,000. Admission 10- 
25-30. J. J. Wood, Redding Theatre (789 
seats), Redding, California. 

WHITE ROSE. (11 reels). Star, Mae 
Marsh. Pleased majority, but some criticism 
on account of Griffith deemed it necessary to 
use the garb of a clergyman to put the 
punch in the picture. Moral tone question- 
able. Had fair attendance. Chas. F. Kean, 
Opera House (450 seats), Minersville, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Universal 

ABYSMAL BRUTE. (7,313 feet). Star, 
Reginald Denny. Good, clever, clean pic- 
ture. Denny draws big crowd here. Ranks 
among the best we have run this year for 
entertainment value. Moral tone not much. 
Had good attendance. Draw neighborhood 
class in town of 1,100. Admission 10-20. 
Henry C. McCoy, Elite Theatre (235 seats), 
Golconda, Illinois. 

BLINKYj (6,740 feet). Star, Hoot Gibson. 
Good picture, but not so pleasing as some 
other Gibsons we have seen. Will please. 
Moral tone okay and It is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw railroad 
class in town of 2,705. Admission 10-25, 
15-30. W. C. Witt, Strand Theatre (450 
seats), Irvine, Kentucky. 

CLEAN UP. (5,051 feet). Star, Herbert 
Rawlinson. No, my patrons said this the 
poorest picture I have shown. Well played, 
but the story was very poor and uninterest- 
ing. Moral tone okay and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw rural 
class in town of 360. Admission 10-25. E. L 
Delano, Electric Theatre (200 seats), Agra, 
Kansas. 

DARLING OF NEW YORK. (6,260 feet). 
Star, Baby Peggy. Good picture; pleased 
well. Suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw high class. Admission 20- 
» 



30-40. Louis Isenberg, Elmwood Theatre 
(1,600 seats), Buffalo, New York. 

HIS MYSTERY GIRL. (4,487 feet). Star, 
Herbert Rawlinson. Can't say much for this 
one. No story or plot to amount to any- 
thing. Had good attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 2,000. Admission 10-20. 
Henry Greife, Opera House (450 seats), 
Windsor, Missouri. 

HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME. (11.00C 

feet). Star, Lon Chaney. This is a wonder- 
ful story. Really worth what they ask for 
it, but it should be confined strictly to legit- 
imate and special houses if the present price 
and running scale is to be maintained. It 
ruins the "movie habit," spoils the people 
who come without coaxing to see good pic- 
tures at prices from twenty to forty cents, 
and when they pay one dollar and sixty-five 
cents they figure that they could have seen 
four good shows for that much and they stay 
away a week or so to make it up. The reg- 
ulars paid the lowest prices and a fc-w new 
ones came In and paid the top, but as a 
whole it was not satisfactory, unless one 
considers giving the people something and 
paying for it yourself. In a legitimate house 
running road shows it is worth what they 
ask for it, presented as that style of a 
show. Chaney is marvelous. Torrence a 
close second, Patsy Ruth Miller great, and 
the settings all great. Moral tone best and 
it Is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw general class in city of 16,000. 
Admission 30-40. Ben L Morris, Tempi* 
Theatre (1,000 seats), Bellaire, Ohio. 

HUNTING BIG GAME IN AFRICA. (8 

reels). We got the school to co-operate with 
us and did good business. Something new 
and went over one hundred per cent. Had 
good attendance. Draw neighborhood class 
in town of 1,100. Admission 10-20. Henry 
C. McCoy, Elite Theatre (235 seats), Golcon- 
da, Illinois. 

MEN IN THE RAW. (4,313 feet). Star, 
Jack Hoxie. Hoxie is becoming popular with 
our patrons. This picture a pleasant mix- 
ture of northern and western drama; has 
some very good comedy. Good scenery, and 
except for being a little hard to follow, is 
a good picture. Moral tone good and It Is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw rural class in town of 150. Admis- 
sion 10-25. D. Basil Rankin, Co-operative 
Theatre, Idana, Kansas. 

RAMBLING KID. (6.395 feet). Star, Hoot 
Gibson. This is one of the few pictures you 
can safely guarantee satisfaction on the 
horse race scene. Beats any screened here 
so far. The adults remarked that they 
wished they could have been up front with 
the kids so they could have yelled along 
with them. It's one of the best westerns we 
ever saw. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
rural class in town of 150. Admission 10- 
25. D. Basil Rankin, Co-operative Theatre, 
Idana, Kansas. 

RAMBLIN' KID. (6,395 feet). Star, Hoot 
Gibson. A dandy program western. Drawn 
out to six reels and sold as a "special." 
Pleased, but had no drawing power. Uni- 
versal Is too high on these. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had below 
average attendance. Draw neighborhood 
class in city of 80,000. Admission 10-15. 
M. F. Meade. Olive Theatre (450 seats), St. 
Joseph, Missouri. 

RED WARNING. (4,795 feet). Star, Jack 
Hoxie. Leave it to Hoxie to put in the pep. 
Ran this on family night and went over 
good. Had good attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 2,000. Admission 10-20. 
Henry Greife, Opera House (450 seats), 
Windsor, Missouri. 

RED WARNING. (4,795 feet). Star, Jack 
Hoxie. Good western of the program sort. 
Moral tone good but it is not suitable for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw neigh- 
borhood class in town of 450. Admission 
10-22. Roy E. Cline, Osage Theatre (225 
seats), Osage, Oklahoma. 

RIDE FOR YOUR LIFE. (5,310 feet). Star, 
Hoot Gibson. Program western; will get by, 
but nothing extra. Moral tone good and it 
Is suitable for Sunday. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw neighborhood class in town of 
450. Admission 10-22. Roy E. Cline, Osage 
Theatre (225 seats), Osage, Oklahoma. 

SHADOWS OF rill'. NORTH. (4,943 feet). 
Star, William Desmond. Beautiful scenery 
and fairly interesting feature. Director 



Coming Soon 

tyriscillatyean 

in a series of special 

productions 
y&H0DKLNS0N RELEASE 





May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



67 



could have made a big picture with this ma- 
terial. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had light attendance. Draw 
farmers in town .of 2,500. Admission 10-20, 
10-25. H. J. Longaker, Howard Theatre (350 
seats), Alexandria, Minnesota. 

SHOOTING FOR LOVE. (5,160 feet). Star, 
Hoot Gibson. A good picture in every way. 
Pleased one hundred per cent. Hoot is the 
best star in pictures for us and prices are 
reasonable. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
town and country class in town of 800. Ad- 
mission 10-20-25. Firkins and Law, Crystal 
Theatre (200 seats), Moravia, Iowa. 

SPORTING YOUTH. (6,712 feet). Star, 
Reginald Denny. Good, clean-cut picture 
that will please everyone. Greatest auto 
race you ever saw. Thrills, spills and fun 
galore. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fine attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 7,000. Admission 10-35. 
R. J. M. Leon, Palace Theatre (220 seats), 
Washington Court House, Ohio. 

THUNDERING DAWN. (6,600 feet). Star 
cast. Good program picture, that's all. 
Nothing to rave about. Some will like it 
and some won't. About a fifty-fifty propo- 
sition. William Noble, Capitol Theatre, 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

WHISPERED NAME. (5,196 feet). Star 
cast. Good picture. Played this family 
night and was well liked. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw all classes in town of 2,000. 
Admission 10-20. Henry Greife, Opera House 
(450 seats), Windsor, Missouri. 



Vitagraph 



LET NOT MAN PUT ASUNDER. (8 reels). 
Star cast. Advertise it for what it is. Good 
picture; will please the educated class fine. 
Don't advertise as religious picture, for it 
is not. Moral tone excellent and it is suit- 
able for any day. Had very good attend- 
ance. Draw best class. W. C. Mclntire, 
Rose Theatre, Burlington, North Carolina. 

MAN FROM BRODNEY'S. (7,100 feet). 
Star, J. Warren Kerrigan. This is one real 
picture. Ran two nights to big business. 
Scenery beautiful. Acting of Kerrigan good. 
Book this and advertise and you can't lose. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Henry C. Mc- 
Coy, Elite Theatre (235 seats), Golconda, 
Illinois. 

MAN FROM BRODNEY'S. (7,100 feet). 
Star, J. Warren Kerrigan. Pleased fairly 
well. We have had enough of this type of 
play here and while this will average up 
with the others, coming later, probably 
comes in for more criticism. It bought 
right will probably pay to play it. Used 
everything for advertising. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw health seekers and tour- 
ists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beau- 
tiful, Saranac Lake, New York. 

MASTERS OF MEN. (6,800 feet). Star, 
Cullen Landis. Ran two nights and did good 
business both nights to crowded houses. 
Give us some more like this one, please. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw neighbor- 
hood class in town of 1,100. Admission 10- 
20. Henry C. McCoy, Elite Theatre (235 
seats), Golconda, Illinois. 

MY WILD IRISH ROSE. (7,650 feet). Star 
cast. So-called special; paid the price of 
three such pictures. This is the kind that 
the patrons will sit an hour and a half and 
walk out with a hard look on their face. 
Wish they had stayed at home. Moral tone 
good but not suitable for Sunday or any 
other day. Had very good attendance. Draw 
miners and business class in town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-25. Lee Dillingham, Kozy The- 
atre (200 seats), Nortonville, Kentucky. 

NINETY AND NINE. (6,800 feet). Star 
cast. Here Is a one hundred per cent, pic- 
ture and your patrons will tell you so, and 
you can buy it right. Don't be afraid of it 
and you will be proud of it. Suitable for 
Sunday. Draw all classes In town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-15. A. E. Rogers, Temple The- 
atre (240 seats), Dexter, New York. 

PIONEER TRAILS. (6,920 feet). Star, 
Cullen Landis. Good western. Look out in 
advertising it. I advertised all Indians and 
my people were fooled. I got my dope from 
paper. Moral tone fair. Not suitable for 
Sunday. Draw rural class in town of 850. 



This Is YOUR 
Department 



Admission 10-25, 10-35. W. F. Haycock, Star 
Theatre, Callaway, Nebraska. 

Warner Bros. 

LUCRETIA LOMBARD. (7,500 feet). Star 
cast. A very good picture. Has wonderful 
human interest. A picture worth stepping 
on. Moral tone good. L. G. Roesner, Colo- 
nial Theatre (800 seats), Winona, Minne- 
sota. 

MARRIAGE CIRCLE. (8,300 feet). Star 
cast. Just the type of picture that is hit- 
ting now. Moral tone okay and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw high class in city 
of 300,000. Admission 35-50-75. Lee D. 
Balsly, Liberty Theatre (1,015 seats), Kan- 
sas City, Missouri. 

MARRIAGE CIRCLE., (8,300 feet). Star 
cast. Grab this one. It will please one hun- 
dred per cent. In my opinion it is the best 
picture of its kind I have ever shown. The 
direction is just about perfect. Cast couldn't 
be beat. The kind of picture that starts the 
whole town talking. Moral tone good and it 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw high and middle class in city of 12,000. 
Admission 10-40. C. B. Hartwig, Antlers 
Theatre (500 seats), Helena, Montana. 

PRINTER'S DEVIL. Star, Wesley Barry. 
Not up to Wesley's other picture by a long 
shot. Came close to being his finish with 
us, I am afraid. Moral tone fair. Had good 
attendance. Draw all classes in town of 
8,000. Admission 10-20. Ned Pedigo, Pollard 
Theatre, Guthrie, Oklahoma. 

RAGS TO RICHES. (6 reels). Star, Wes- 
ley Barry. Good picture. Pleased one hun- 
dred per cent. Film old. Paid at least one- 
third too much. Moral tone good. Suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
town and country class in town of 800. Ad- 
mission 10-20-25. Firkins and Law, Crystal 
Theatre (200 seats), Moravia, Iowa. 

WHERE THE NORTH BEGINS. (6,200 
feet). Star, Rin Tin Tin (dog). Good pic- 
ture. Moral tone good and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw small 
town and farm class in town of 2,000. Ad- 
mission 10-30. Wallis B.-others, Isis Theatre 
(260 seats), Russell, Kansas. 

Comedies 

ARTIST. (Fox). Star, Clyde Cook. Bet- 
ter than many of Clyde's two-reelers. He 
is the equal of Pollard at pulling off numb- 
skull stunts. Moral tone okay. Had extra 
good attendance. Draw rural class- in town 
of 400. Admission 25-30. E. D. Partridge, 
Pyam Theatre (240 seats), Kinsman, Ohio. 

AUTHOR. (Fox). Star, Al St. John. They 
had enough good material for only about 
one and a half reels when they set Al to 
work on this two-reeler, so not quite up to 
Al's standard, although it is a dandy at that. 
Moral tone okay. Had good attendance. Draw 
rural class in town of 400. Admission 25- 
30. E. L. Partridge, Pyam Theatre (240 
seats), Kinsman, Ohio. 

BEFORE THE PUBLIC. (Pathe). Star, 
Snub Pollard. A real scream. More action 
than Snub is used to. Draw all classes in 
town of 2,800. Admission 15-25. D. W. 
Strayer, Mt. Joy Theatre (250 seats), Mt. 
Joy, Pennsylvania. 

BEFORE THE PUBLIC. (Pathe). Star, 
Snub Pollard. Good comedy. Nuf sed. Print 
good. Suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw all classes in big city. Ad- 
mission ten cents. Stephen G. Brenner, 
Eagle Theatre (298 seats), Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

BIG SHOW, BOIS TO BOARD. (Pathe). 

Stars, our Gang. Am featuring the "Our 
Gang" comedies and believe they help to 
draw the crowd. How the kids do love 'em 
and the adults forget their troubles. Moral 
tone good and you bet it is suitable for Sun- 



day. Draw country class and townspeople 
in town of 800. Admission usually 10-25 
Guy C. Sawyer, Town Hall Theatre (250 
seats), Chester, Vermont. 

BLUEBEARD OF THE JUNGLES. (Mas- 
terpiece). Star. Snooky. Rotten. Abso- 
lutely don't even take it for a short filler 
n. W. Strayer. Mt. Joy Theatre (250 seats)! 
Mt. Joy, Pennsylvania. 

CHAMPEEN. (Pathe— Onr Gang). As the 
average of them, good, and draws the same 
way. T he little "Sunshine Sammy" and the 
'freckled faced kid" are sure the bricks. 
Moral tone okay and is always suitable for 
Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw rural 
and email town class in town of 286 Ad- 
mission 10-25. R. K. Russell, Legion The- 
atre (136 seats), Cushing, Iowa. 

CHRISTMAS. (Mr. & Mrs. Carter De- 
Haven). Only a very few laughs. These 
comedies do not take here and we have ten 
more to run. Film fine. Suitable for Sun- 
day. Draw all types in town of 2,800 Ad- 
mission 10-25. R. K. Russell, Legion The- 
atre (250 seats), Mt. Joy, Pennsylvania. 

COBBLER. (Pathe). Oar Gang. Our 
Gang comedies a sure cure for empty seats 
Prints all good. Moral tone okay and it Is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw all classes in big city. Admission ten 
cents. Stephen G. Brenner, Eagle Theatre 
(218 seats), Baltimore, Maryland. 

DB HAVEN COMEDIES. (De Haven). 
Stars, Mr. and Mrs. Carter De Haven. While 
these comedies are well made, they do not 
appeal to popular audiences. Our patrons 
find very few laughs in them. Moral tone 
excellent and it is suitable for Sunday. Draw 
neighborhood class in city of 80,000. Ad- 
mission 10-15. M. F. Meade, Olive Theatre 
(450 seats), St. Joseph, Missouri. 

DONE IN OIL. (Christie Comedy). Star, 
Jimmy Adams. Not so good. It received 
very few laughs. The poorest Christie of 
the new group. The others we had were 
great. Draw better class in town of 4,500. 

C. A. Anglemire, "Y" Theatre, Nazareth, 
Pennsylvania. 

EASTER BONNETS. (Taxedo Comedy). 

The first one for us of the Tuxedo come- 
dies. It went across good for us and had 
some funnybone ticklers in it. Draw better 
class. Admission 10-15. C. A. Anglemire, 
"Y" Theatre, Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 

EXIT CAESAR. (Educational). A regu- 
lar slapstick comedy in a hick town. There 
were some new stunts pulled off which 
brought hearty chuckles. Draw better class. 
Admission 10-15. C. A. Anglemire, "Y" The- 
atre, Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 

FIDDLL\' FOOL. (HotLkinsOn). Star, 
Charles Murray. Good. Ninety-nine of 
Charles Murray comedies are such. 
Suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw neighborhood class in town of 4,071. 
Admission 10-22. W. E. Elkin. Temple The- 
atre (500 seats). Aberdeen, Mississ.ppi. 

HOME BRUISE. (Chester Comedy). Star, 
Snooky. Good comedy. Snooky good; lota 
and lots of laughter. Draw all classes in 
town of 2,800. Admission 15-25. D. W. 
Strayer, Mt. Joy Theatre (250 seats), Mt, 
Joy, Pennsylvania. 

NO OI\E TO HAVE. (Universal). Good 
single reel comedy. Moral tone okay and 
it is okay for Sunday. City of 300,000. Lee 

D. Balsly, Liberty Theatre (1,012 seats), Kan- 
sas City, Missouri. 

SAILOR MADE MAN. (4 reels). Star, 
Harold Lloyd. Very clever and of a very 
convenient length. Moral tone okay and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw rural class in town of 400. Ad- 
mission 25-30. E. L. Partridge, Pyam The- 
atre (240 seats), Kinsman, Ohio. 

too MUCH BUSINESS. (Pathe). Stars, 

Our Gang. These kids sure are good. Ev- 
erybody yells when they appear. Moral 
tone good. A. F. Jenkins, Community The- 
atre, David City, Nebraska. 

WIDE OPEN. (Educational). A Mermaid 
comedy of the golf links, with Lige Conley. 
It keeps up the reputat.on of Mermaid com- 
edies for good, consistent comedy and is 
worth advertising with the feature. I find 
all of the Educational comedies good. C. W. 
Cupp, Royal Theatre (400 seats), Arkadel- 
phla, Arkansas. 



Serials 



RUTH OF THE RANGE. (Pathe). Star, 



63 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Ruth Roland. On fifth episode. Pleasing 
and attendance is good. Have shown all 
Pathe serials since "Perils of Pauline," and 
all have held up fine. Moral tone okay. Had 
good attendance. Draw small town calss in 
town of 3,500. Admission 10-20-30. C. T. 
Meisburg, Opera House (600 seats), Harrods- 
burg, Kentucky. 

Short Subjects 

DARK TIMBER. (Educational-Wilderness 
TaleK, A scenic gem almost completely 
spoiled by a detracting and assinine plot. 
Why do they do such things? Draw all 
classes in town of 3,000. Admission 10-25- 
30. J. J. Wood, Redding Theatre (789 seats), 
Redding. California. 

FIGHTING BLOOD, NO. 12. (Film Rook- 
ing Offices). Just finished the second series 
of these unusually good pictures. If any 
exhibitor hasn't bought these unusually 
good pictures, get wise to yourself. Will 
get the money. Moral tone good. Had good 
attendance. J. J. Spandan, Family Theatre, 
Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS. (Universal). An 

excellent news film. Up to date and very 
pleasing. William Noble, Capitol Theatre, 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS. (Universal). Al- 
wavs good. No program complete without a 
late news. City of 300.000. Lee D. Balsly, 
Liberty Theatre (1,012 seats), Kansas City, 
Missouri. 

LAST STAND OF RED MAN. (Vitagraph). 
A single-reel of the Indian. A good bit of 
entertainment. Lee D. Balsly. Liberty The- 
atre (1,012 seats), Kansas City, Missouri. 

LEATHER PUSHERS. (Universal )j Star, 
Reginald Denny. Excellent pictures and al- 
ways very pleasing. William Noble, Empress 
Theatre, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

SECOND SERIES OP PIC H TING BLOOD. 
<F. B. O.). Am on the fourth round and this 
series is holding up even better than the 
first and that's saying a great deal. Draw 
college class in town of 4,000. C. W. Cupp, 
Royal Theatre (400 seats), Arkadelphia, Ar- 
kansas. 

MYSTERIES OF THE SEA. (Pathe — 
Aesop's Fables). One of the nicest one-half- 
reel Aesop's Fables you could wish for. It 
is interesting to the finish. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw farmers in town of 2,500. 
Admission 10-20, 10-25. H. J. Longaker, 
Howard Theatre (350 seats), Alexandria, 
Minnesota. 

PATHE NEWS. (Pathe). This news reel 
is consistently not only good, but excellent. 
William Noble, Empress Theatre, Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma. 

TAKING A CHANCE. (Pathe). A dandy 
one-reeler, showing athletics in both slow 
and regular speed. Scenes of Babe Ruth in 
action, steer busting, pole vaulting, etc. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw farmers 
in town of 2,500. Admission 10-20, 10-25. 
H. J. Longaker, Howard Theatre (350 seats), 
Alexandria, Minnesota. 

Miscellaneous 

BLASTED HOPES. (Arrow). Star, Ed- 
mund Cobb. Fair. Print so new that ma- 
chines were all covered with emulsion. Wish 
all the exchanges could send prints as good 



Keep the Pages 

GOING BIG and 
GROWING BIGGER 



as this one. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
neighborhood class in city of 15,000. Admis- 
sion 10-15. Ulysses A. Pousant, Bijou Thea- 
tre (500 seats), Waterville, Maine. 

DARLING OF THE RICH. (Slate Right — 
Whitman Bennett Production). Star, Betty 
Blythe. (6,260 feet). Good program picture 
but didn't do much at box office. No draw- 
ing power. Poor paper. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had poor at- 
tendance. Draw college students in town 
of 2,100. Admission 15-25. R. X. Williams, 
Lyric Theatre (250 seats), Oxford, Mis- 
sissippi. 

END OF THE ROPE. (State Right). Star, 
Big Boy Williams. Fair western. His last 
pictures not so good as the first ones he 
was in. Big Boy is popular here. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. 
Had average attendance. Draw neighbor- 
hood class in city of 15,000. Admission 10- 
15. Ulysses A. Pousant, Bijou Theatre (500 
seats), Waterville, Maine. 

FIGHTING STRAIN, (William Steiner). 

Star, Neal Hart. Very good. Different from 
the type of westerns that he usually stars 
in. Hart in the role of a returned soldier. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw neigh- 
borhood class in city of 15,000. Admission 
10-15. Ulysses A. Pousant, Bijou Theatre 
(500 seats), Waterville, Maine. 

FIGHTING JIM GRANT. (Ward Lascelle). 

Star, Lester Cuneo. Lots of flaws can be 
found in the acting of the minor characters 
in this picture, but, for houses that are after 
action stuff with excellent photography, here 
is a production that will surely live up to ex- 
pectations. The action is fast and fierce and 
there are plenty comedy situations. Had them 
standing up, yelling, most of the time. Moral 
tone fair but it is not suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw general class in 
town of 1,000. Admission 10-25, 15-35. H. H. 
Hedbeig, Amuse-U Theatre, Melville, Louis- 
iana. 

GOLD MADNESS. (5,860 feet). Star, Guy 
Bates Post. The star is no doubt a good 
actor but entirely out of his berth in this 
picture as he made love to two young girls, 
but my audience knew he was too darned 
old. Program picture. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had poor attend- 
ance. Draw average middle class in town 
of 4,000. Admission 10-20. Empress Theatre 
(350 seats), Webb City, Missouri. 

ISOBEL. (Flaming Barriers). Curwood 
story. (Arrow). Very good program picture, 
with good story. Had several favorable 
comments on this one. Good moral tone, 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw miners and factory people, town of 
900. Admission 10-25. Lee Dillingham, 
Kozy Theatre (250 seats), Nortonville. 
Kentucky. 



KI.Xi CREEK LAWj (I'hotodraraa). Star, 

Leo Malaney. Good picture. Usual advertis- 
ing. Moral tone good. Had fair attendance. 
Draw all classes and town people in town 
of 450. Admission 10-20, 15-35. A. F. Thomas, 
Pastime Theatre (250 seats), Almyra, 
Arkansas. 

LUCK. (C. C. Burr). (6 reels). Star, 
Johnny Hines. A very good comedy drama 
and really a very good little picture. Moral 
tone good, suitable for Sunday. Good at- 
tendance drawing town and country class, 
town of 500. Admission 10-25. A. F. 
Schreiver, Oneida Theatre (225 seats), Oneida, 
South Dakota. 

MALE WANTED. (Lee — Bradford). Star, 

Arthur Housman. Very good comedy drama. 
Suitable for Sunday if one or two scenes are 
cut out. All male attendance, excepting one 
girl, and she is deaf and dumb, so she 
couldn't go to the Mission for Women. Poor 
Lenten season. Draw neighborhood class in 
city of 15,000. Admission 10-15. Ulysses A. 
Pousant, Bijou Theatre (500 seats), Water- 
ville, Maine. 

HAN FROM NEW YORK. (State Right). 

Star, Fred Church. A fair western and noth- 
ing extra. Not much action for a western. 
Suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw working class in city of 14,000. Ad- 
mission 10-20. G. M Bertling, Favorite The- 
atre (187 seats), Piqua, Ohio. 

SECRET OP THE PUEBLO. (William 

Steiner). Star, Neal Hart. Good. Hart's pic- 
tures have always a lot of action. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw neighborhood class 
in city of 15,000. Admission 10-15. Ulysses 
A. Pousant, Bijou Theatre (500 seats), Wat- 
erville, Maine. 

<I'IBER AND THE ROSE. (Principal >. 

Star cast. Very strong picture. Much bet- 
ter than a lot of so-called specials. Some 
very forceful acting and taken all together 
would suggest buying at a reasonable figure. 
Pleased very well and had splendid com- 
ments. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
all classes in town of 2,500. Admission 10- 
20-28. S. Spicer, Miami Theatre (450 seats). 
Franklin, Ohio. 

SUPERSTITION. (Lee-Bradford). 

cast. Very poor feature. Actors looked 
foolish. Moral tone fair. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw neighborhood class in city of 
15,000. Admission 10-15. Ulysses A. Pousant, 
Bijou Theatre (500 seats), Waterville, Maine. 

SURE FIRE FLINT. (C C. Burr). Star, 
Johnny Hines. Here's one you can run 
to the entire satisfaction of your audience, 
no matter who or what they are. It's laugh- 
able, clean and good. Moral tone good and 
suitable for Sunday. Had very good at- 
tendance. Draw better class in town of 6,000. 
Admission 25-30. Lester T. Husted, Hastings 
Theatre (660 seats), Hastings-On-Hudson. 
New York. 

TEN NIGHTS IN A BARROOM. (Arrow). 

Star cast. (8 reels). Procured from Arkan- 
sas Specialty Film Company. Would have 
been very good If the print hadn't been junk. 
Ye gods, such a print. Baby Ivy Ward a 
real little star (between jumps in film). 
Moral tone okay and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw oil and 
farm class in town of 608. Admission 10- 
25. J. A. Herring, Play House Theatre (249 
seats), Strong, Arkansas. 




Scenes from C. B. C.'s latest production, "Pal o' Mine." 



May 3. 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



69 




Scenes from Pathe's "Flickering Youth," a two-reel comedy starring Harry Langdon 
and produced by Mack Sennett. 



N. Y. Exhibitors to Convene in 
Buffalo; Say Brandt to Retire 



Lining Up Big Stories 

C. B. C. New Series to Be Released 
Under Name of "Perfection 
Pictures" 

This week has been an extremely busy 
one for Jack Cohn, vice president of the 
C. B. C. Film Sales Corporation. He has 
devoted practically all of his time searching 
for possible material to be used as film 
stories in the new series of Perfection Pic- 
tures to be released by C. B. C. this com- 
ing season. 

Mr. Cohn stated today that he has se- 
cured the motion picture rights to eight 
stories ; each one of these stories contains 
the necessary box-office punch as suggested 
by the following titles : "The Battling Fool," 
"Fatal Kiss," "Women First," "The Woman 
Hater," "The Fearless Lover," "A Fight for 
Honor," "All for Love" and "The Price He 
Paid." 

Shooting continuity has been completed 
on "The Battling Fool" and Harry Cohn, 
who is in charge of production at the C. B. 
C. West Coast studio, wires that they have 
just completed the scenario on "Fatal Kiss." 

William Fairbanks and Eva Novak will be 
the featured players in this series of eight 
Perfection Specials in addition to the "all 
star" casts which will be announced at later 
dates. 



Finishes "Tiger Love" 

"Tiger Love," George Melford's latest 
production for Paramount, which co- 
features Antonio Moreno and Estelle Taylor, 
has been completed and sent to the labora- 
tory for its final editing and titling. 

Adapted by Howard Hawks from the 
opera, "The Wild Cat," "Tiger Love" is said 
to be the most colorful drama of Spanish 
life which has been filmed since "Blood and 
Sand." It is the love story of a famous 
bandit and the daughter of an aristocrat. 

Snitz Edwards, Monti Collins and Edgar 
Norton are included in the supporting cast. 

Postmaster Aids 
Film Shipments 

As a result of numerous complaints 
filed with the Post Office Department by 
moving picture exchanges, regarding the 
failure of postmasters to return prompt- 
ly undeliverable films, the Third Assist- 
ant Postmaster General has instructed 
all postmasters to exercise the greatest 
possible vigilance to see that films when 
not accepted by the addressee are 
promptly returned in accordance with 
the sender's instructions on his return 
card where the address label bears a 
pledge to pay return postage. 

"The question of time is an important 
factor in the case of motion picture 
films," the new orders point out, "as the 
films are contracted 1 for by different 
theatres for certain definite periods, and 
it will readily be understood that any 
delay in transmission of such films, such 
as the failure of a postmaster to return 
them as requested in the return card, 
may prevent their use at the time sched- 
uled and consequently result in loss and 
embarrassment." 



By TOM WALLER 

THE annual convention of the Motion 
Picture Theatre Owners of New York 
State will probably be held in Buffalo 
about the middle of June, according to 
William Brandt, president of the organiza- 
tion. Cities in upper New York have of- 
fered the showmen attractive inducements, 
especially the Albany Chamber of Commerce, 
but as things now stand, Brandt says, the 
invitation of Buffalo's enterprising mayor 
doubtless will be accepted. 

Although he refused to make any com- 
ment, it is understood that Brandt will not 
be on the platform for re-election. From 
authoritative sources it is gathered that the 
present incumbent's many business interests, 
including the ownership of five theatres, are 
so pressing as to necessitate his devoting 
his entire time to them. Such an office- 
holder should devote all his time to the ex- 
ecution of his work for the organization, is 
an expression credited to Brandt. The job 
is one that requires the full time of any ex- 
ecutive, who should be remunerated with a 
salary commensurate in proportion, or noth- 
ing less than $25,000 per year. The latter is 
also gathered as having come from the or- 
ganization's head. 

This last year especially has been a busy 
one for the M. P. T. O. N. Y. president. 
Twelve pieces of legislation at the State 
capitol, each having a primary effect upon 
the exhibitor, have been under his contem- 
plation without the exception of a single 
day. 

The attention of the organization has been 
called to a state of affairs reported to be 
existent in Norwich, N. Y. The three ex- 
hibitors of that town arc being laced by a 



group of local reformers who seek, it is 
said, to abolish Sunday showings. 

Under the State law such showings are 
optional, so that with the sanction of local 
officials, already said to have been obtained, 
the matter will be decided by the people at 
a referendum taking place early next month. 



Under New "U" Contract 



Jack Hoxie Starts First Feature, 
"Fighting Fury" 

Plans have been completed for Jack 
Hoxie's next Universal feature, "Fighting 
Fury," which will start, under the direction 
of Clifford Smith, next week. 

The new picture is adapted from "Triple 
Cross for Danger," a story by Walter Co- 
burn. Hoxie will play both father and son 
in the new picture. 

A big cast will be assembled for the story, 
and "Bunk," the big shepherd dog from 
Australia will have an important part. 



Latest Gilbert Feature 

Production has been started at the Wil- 
liam Fox West Coast Studios on the latest 
program feature "Colorau," which stars 
John Gilbert. This is a story by Jessie 
Maud Wybro. Howard Mitchell is directing 
this production and the scenario was pre- 
pared by Dorothy Yost. 



"Happy Days" Comedies 

Work started this week at the studio of 
the Totten and Hurley combination at West- 
erly, R. I., on the first of a series of come- 
dies this team will make under the title of 
"Happy Days," featuring children. 



70 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Cobb Joins C. B. C. 

Appointment of F. Heath Cobb as director 
of publicity and advertising was announced 
this week by Joe Brandt, president of 
C. B. C. Film Sales Corporation. The ap- 
pointment is effective immediately, and Mr. 
Cobb this week took up his new duties. He 
will exercise a supervision over the selec- 
tion of stories, in addition to his advertising 
and publicity duties. 



To Support Viola Dana 

Viola Dana's newest Metro starring pic- 
ture, "The Beauty Prize," from a Saturday 
Evening Post story by Nina Wilcox Put- 
nam, went into production last week under 
the direction of Lloyd Ingraham. The cast 
supporting Miss Dana consists of Pat 
O'Malley, Eddie Phillips, Eunice Vin Moore, 
Edward Connelly, Edith Yorke, Joan Stand- 
ing and Fred Truesdale. 



Booked for Summer 

For the past several weeks Pathe branch 
offices have been experiencing an unusually 
heavy demand for Hal Roach's feature ver- 
sion of Jack London's famous dog story, 
"The Call of the Wild," which is being dis- 
tributed by Pathe Exchanges, Inc. In prac- 
tically every instance, the picture has been 
booked for June or July presentation. In- 
vestigation disclosed that the Alaskan setting 
of the picture, with its snow-country back- 
grounds and typically northern atmosphere 
is considered by exhibitors to make this pro- 
duction admirably suited to summer pro- 
grams. 



Jack Pickf ord's Latest 

The first few hundred feet of film passed 
through the camera last week for Tom J. 
Geraghty's initial independent production in 
which Jack Pickford is starring, and which 
is being filmed at the Picxford-Fairbanks 
studios, Hollywood, under the title of "The 
End of the World." 



Pick Leading Players 

Ramon Novarro and Enid Bennett have 
been selected by Fred Niblo to p,ortray the 
leading characters in his new production for 
the Metro-Louis B. Mayer forces, "The Red 
Lily," which was earlier announced under 
the working title of "Judgment." "The Red 
Lily" is the first story Mr. Niblo has ever 
written directly for the screen. 



Boston Convention to Hear 

Report on Legislative Work 

L 



EGISLATION affecting theatre owners 
has greatly intensified interest in the 
coming national convention of the 
Motion Picture Theatre Owners of America 
at Boston because of the advances being 
made in this relation by President Sydney 
S. Cohen and other national officers. Through 
moves under way at Washington, millions 
of dollars will be saved theatre owners an- 
nually. The increase in the prestige of the 
exhibitor through the favorable impression 
his representatives have made on govern- 
ment officials at Washington is worth even 
more in a business way than the actual 
money saved. A complete report of these 
procedures will be made at the Boston con- 
vention which will be held at the Copley 
Plaza Hotel on May 27, 28 and 29. 

There will be a meeting at the headquar- 
ters of the Motion Picture Theatre Owners 
of Massachusetts in Boston on Tuesday next 
to make final convention arrangements. This 
meeting will be attended by Sydney S. Cohen, 
national president; M. E. Comerford of 
Scranton, Pa., national director; Joseph 
Walsh, president of the M. P. T. O. of Con- 
necticut; E. M. Fay, president of the M. 
P. T. O. of Rhode Island; Jacob Lourie, 



president of the M. P. T. O. of Massa- 
chusetts; Dave Adams, president of the M. 
P. T. O. of New Hampshire, and other offi- 
cers from these states, as well as C. M. 
Maxfield of Hartford; Louis Sagal, general 
manager of the Poli Enterprises of New 
Haven; M. J. O'Toole, chairman of the Na- 
tional Public Service Department; Henry 
Wasserman of Roxbury, chairman of the 
convention Committee; Ernest Horstman, 
secretary of the Massachusetts body; Joseph 
Seider, chairman of the board of directors 
of the New Jersey organization; Al Elliot 
of Hudson, N. Y., and others. 

Advices have reached national headquar- 
ters of the election of delegates in Arkansas, 
which include State President Eli W. Col- 
lins of Jonesboro, Secretary O. C. Hauber 
and C. A. Lick, a member of the National 
Board of Directors. 

A large delegation of Theatre Owners 
will come from Wisconsin, whose members 
will put in a bid for the 1925 convention. 
President Fred Seegert will head the dele- 
gation and will have with him representa- 
tives from the Mayor of Milwaukee and 
the Board of Trade there, asking for the 
convention in an official way. 



F. B. O.'s "Spirit of U. S. A." 
Has Many Exploitive Angles 

T 



(HE Film Booking Offices announce 
that the definite release date of 
Emory Johnson's fifth production, 
"The Spirit of the U. S. A.," co-starring 
Mary Carr and Johnnie Walker, will be 
May 12. F. B. O. has already started its 
high-pressure advertising and exploitation 
campaign on the big Johnson feature. 

The initial stunt on "The Spirit of the 
U. S. A." was a recruiting tie-up with the 
212th Artillery, Anti-Aircraft, of the New 
York National Guard, which paraded 
through Times Square. More than 1,000 
soldiers, 400 horses and riders, motor lorries, 
tanks, machine guns and other equipment of 
modern warfare took part in the stunt. Ban- 
ners advertising the forthcoming Johnson 




Scene of F. B. O.'s initial stunt on Emory Johnson's "Spirit of the U .S. A." A tie-up 
was made with the 212th Artillery resulting in a parade down Broadway. 



production were tied onto the motor lorries 
and tanks and carried by the regimental 
band. On Broadway about 35,000 heralds ad- 
vertising "The Spirit of the U. S. A." on one 
side, and the 212th Artillery on the other 
were distributed by the soldiers. 

This stunt is said to be only the start of 
the exploitation campaign in Manhattan and 
throughout the country. Four parades, down 
the White Way, are also scheduled for the 
near future. 

Another interesting feature of F. B. O.'s 
stunt, is that the various commanders have 
indicated they are willing to help first runs 
and subsequent runs in repeating the re- 
cruiting stunt. In addition to this, they will 
lend the theatres all kinds of war parapher- 
nalia guns, gas masks, wagons, horses and 
a thousand and one things that an exhibitor 
can use as a lobby display and for ballyhoo 
purposes. There is no city in the United 
States in which this stunt cannot be pulled. 

Another thing that will help exhibitors in 
securing the co-operation of National Guard 
commanders, is the fact that the huge tattle 
scenes of "The Spirit of the U. S. A." were 
filmed with the complete co-operation of the 
U. S. Government at the army reservation 
in San Francisco. More than 600 feet of 
battle scenes were contributed by the war 
department, the scenes having been filmed 
by doughboys under fire in France. These 
pictures have never before been shown on 
the screen, F. B. O. reports. 

The vastness of Johnson's new picture is 
indicated by the fact that more than one 
hundred thousand troops are shown in ac- 
tion in the various scenes of warfare. Nearly 
ten thousand guns appear in many of the 
scenes depicting the bombardmei.t of Rheims, 
Chatteau Thierry and other battles. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



71 



Scores in Hartford 



Manager of Capitol Writes C. B. C. on 
"The Barefoot Boy" 

C. B. C. Film Sales Corporation announces 
that it is in receipt of a letter from J. F. 
Clancy, mar.iger of Poli's Capitol Theatre, 
Hartford, Con. In the communication 
Clancy praises c. B. C.'s "The Barefoot Boy" 
and attributes a good bit of the success he 
had with this production to the fact that he 
held it up particularly as an attraction for 
school kiddies. 

"The Capito; seats 3,500 persons," he 
writes." At the opening matinee the theatre 
was crowded to capacity one hour after the 
doors opened. Capacity ruled the next day 
and the next, the latter being Saturday 
which turned out to be the biggest in point 
of attendance in the history of the house." 



New Company Formed 

Paul Schofield, scenario writer, and 
William K. Howard, formerly a director 
with Fox, Truart, Tiffany and R-C, have 
formed the Schofield-Howard Productions, 
contracted a release for four feature-length 
pictures and arranged the finances of the 
series. Production of the first starts at the 
Ince studio this month. It is an adaptation 
by Schofield of a story in the Saturday 
Evening Post by Richard Connell, "The 
Tropic of Capricorn." Howard will direct 
and Schofield handle the business end. An 
all-star cast will be used. 



Allen in New York 

E. H. Allen, general manager of the units 
producing comedies for the Educational 
Film Exchanges, Inc., program at the Fine 
Arts Studio in Los Angeles, is in New York 
conferring with E. W. Hammons, president 
of Educational Film Exchanges, Inc., re- 
garding production plans for the coming 
fall and winter. 

Mr. Allen was accompanied east by Fred 
Hibbard, who has been directing Lloyd 
Hamilton in his last few pictures. Mr. Hib- 
bard will visit friends and relatives before 
returning to Los Angeles. 



Sells to Greater Features 

Greater Features Inc., of Seattle, Wash., 
have purchased the Lee-Bradford special 
production "Captain Kleinschmidt's Adven- 
tures in the Far North" for their five offices 
in the North West. 



RICHARD BARTHEMLESS in "The 
Enchanted Cottage," a current First 
National release, was lauded by New 
York photoplay critics who reviewed the 
picture when it opened at the Broadway 
Strand recently. Not only New York, but 
representative reviewers from other cities, 
were unstinted in their praise of the acting 
of Barthelmess and Miss McAvoy and in 
the excellent handling of the unusual theme 
by Director John S. Robertson. 

"One of the finest motion picture dramas 
which we have ever seen," said the New 
York World. "We want to advise everyone 




TEN years ago this week Mark Strand 
established an epoch in the advance- 
ment of filmdom when he opened in 
Manhattan what is conceded by the old 
timers and authorities to be the first million 
dollar theatre, the first movie theatre to 
have a symphony orchestra and the first to 
score pictures to music and introduce the 
ballet and other divertissements. 

Moe Mark, president, and Joseph Plun- 
kett, managing director, have thus set aside 
this week of April 20 as one to honor the 
passing of the first decade of the Mark 
Strand's brilliantly successful and inspiring 
existence. The originality, foresight and 
efforts of the Mark Sirand's highest policy 
may be credited with having largely pro- 
moted the better class of pictures to the 
standard of recognized artistry, a standard 
that is fast coming into its own even in the 
remotest sections of the globe. 

As part of the observance of this anniver- 
sary the Mark Strand this week is sending 
to its patrons and friends a souvenir pro- 



to go and see the beauty of this gem of 
intimate cinema dramatics." "Gaze on 'The 
Enchanted Cottage,'" wrote the reviewer 
in the Herald Tribune, "and never again 
will you believe it when they tell you that 
pictures are in their infancy and that the 
surface has only been scratched." 

Chicago Tribune: "Richard Barthelmess 
is quoted as believing he does the best act- 
ing of his career in 'The Enchanted Cot- 
tage.' I believe him. Also little May Mc- 
Avoy will astonish you. From every stand- 
point you will find 'The Enchanted Cottage' 
an exquisite production. It has been di- 




gram in which is told the history of the 
theatre which has done so much for the 
betterment of the industry and the public. 
Managing Director Plunkett has arranged to 
have many movie celebrities distribute these 
programs at the Wednesday matinee. • 

In this program are numerous laudatorv 
letters from chief officials of the state and 
city. Governor Smith's letter in part states : 
"The Strand indeed led the way to a new 
and larger development of the motion pic- 
ture. It was the first to introduce the so- 
called modern picture entertainment.'' 

"Personally and officially I pay high trib- 
ute to the Mark Strand Theatre, an insti- 
tution of beneficence and a harbinger of 
happiness," writes Mayor John F. Hylan. 
Speaking of the theatre's tenth anniversary, 
the Mayor comments : "To have provided 
amusement and edification during that pe- 
riod for a patronage eight times our total 
city population of six millions is a unique 
tribute to the character of the performances 
given." 



Blaney Shipping Prints 

Prints of "One Law for the Woman," the 
Charles E. Blaney melodrama which Vita- 
graph is releasing, are being shipped to all 
branches. 



rected by a man who displays that rare 
combination — sympathy, imagination, and 
common sense." New York American : "For 
those who lixe fine things in pictures I rec- 
ommend 'The Enchanted Cottage.' " 

Baltimore Evening Sun : " 'The Enchanted 
Cottage' contains an underlying idea so truly 
beautiful and fragile that we feel pretty 
much like putting on gloves to handle it, 
even for a few moments. It has been a long 
time since the movies have bothered them- 
selves to give us anything quit so exquisite, 
so satisfying, so poetic, as this photoplay." 

New York Evening World : "In all our 
picture-going experience we have never seen a 
better made or more charming photodrama." 



OFFICIALS OF THE STRAND THEATRE 
Moe Mark, president, and Joseph Plunkett, managing director. 

New York City's Mark Strand 
Celebrates Tenth Anniversary 



'Enchanted Cottage" Is Lauded 
by Critics All Over Country 



72 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Paramount Forms 100 Per Cent 
Club for Its Sales Employees 




GEORGE SIDNEY 
Who has been signed by Samuel Goldwyn 
to play Abe Potash in "Potash and Perl- 
mutter in Hollywood" in place of Barney 
Bernard, who died recently. 

Knickerbocker Appointed 

Charles Knickerbocker previously in 
charge of the Hodkinson branch at Kansas 
City has been transferred to Minneapolis 
where he will assume the duties of branch 
manager E. E. Reynolds who has resigned. 



FORMATION of the Paramount 100 Per 
Cent Club and the provision for group 
insurance of salesmen, head bookers 
and exchange advertising sales managers, 
were outstanding announcements made by 
General Manager S. R. Kent at the divisional 
sales convention of the Paramount depart- 
ment of distribution which closed a three- 
day session at the Hotel Pennsylvania in 
New York Saturday. 

As stated by Mr. Kent, the Paramount 
100 Per Cent Club will be a continuing or- 
ganization with changing personnel and will 
be made up of eighteen salesmen who, be- 
cause of their character, deportment and ef- 
ficiency are deemed best representative of 
Paramount in the field. This group will 
meet yearly as a council, will sit in on ses- 
sions of the company's executives and by 
the exchange of ideas will be able to advise 
on the operations of the company from the 
viewpoint of the men in the field. Promo- 
tions in the department will be made from 
the 100 Per Cent. Club. 

In addition to these advantages, each 
member of the club will receive an annual 
bonus of $750 and a paid up life insurance 
policy in the Equitable Life Assurance So- 
ciety for $3,000. The first year a salesman 
becomes a member of the club the life in- 
surance will be for the term of two years. 



Three Program 
for Fox 



Pictures 

Release in May 



THREE star series attractions and one 
Sunshine Comedy are scheduled for 
release by Fox Film Corporation dur- 
ing May. The program pictures will fea- 
ture Tom Mix, Charles Jones and John Gil- 
bert. 

"The Trouble Shooter," which will be re- 
leased on May 4, is the latest William Fox 
production starring Tom Mix. The story and 
scenario is the work of Frederick and Fanny 
Hatton. John Conway directed. Kathleen 
Key has the leading feminine role. The 
other principals are Earl Fox, J. Gunnis 
Davis, Howard Truesdale, Frank Currier, 
Mike Donlin, Dolores Rousse, Charles Mc- 
Hugh and Al Freemont. 

Charles Jones' latest starring vehicle, "The 



Circus Cowboy," will be released the week 
of May 11. William Wellman directed. Louis 
Sherwin wrote the story and Doty Hobart 
the scenario. The cast includes Marian 
Nixon, Jack McDonald, Ray Hallor, Mar- 
guerite Clayton and George Romain. 

"The Lone Chance," with John Gilbert 
featured, will be released on May 18. Howard 
Mitchell directed. The story is by Fred Jack- 
son and the scenario by Charles Kenyon. 
Evelyn Brent is Gilbert's new leading woman. 
Others in the cast are John Miljan, Edward 
Tilton, Frank Beal, Harry Todd and Florence 
Wix. 

"When Wise Ducks Meet" is the title of 
the William Fox Sunshine Comedy which 
will be released the week of May 4. 



If the salesman qualifies for a second year 
in the club, the policy will run for five 

years. 

According to the group insurance plan, 
each salesman, head booker and advertising 
sales manager who has completed six months 
of continuous service is insured on a straight 
life policy for $1,000. 

The policies, which are issued by the 
Equitable Life Assurance Society and are 
non-assignable, were distributed at the con- 
vention by Mr. Kent and are dated 
March 1. 

Each policy-holding employee is given a 
quota to fill during the fiscal year ending 
April 30, and should he be successful in 
filling this quota he has his insurance in- 
creased to $3,000, to be in force throughout 
the succeeding year. The insurance is car- 
ried free of any expense to the insured, so 
long as he remains in the employ of the 
Department of Distribution. In case of total 
disability through injury or disease the full 
amount of the insurance will be paid in cash 
installments starting six months after the 
submission of proof of disability. In a 
signed letter incorporated in each policy Mr. 
Kent said : 

"I trust you will recognize in this arrange- 
ment an effort to give a concrete manifesta- 
tion of a very genuine interest which I feel 
in all of you who are associated with me 
in the work of keeping Famous Players 
'Paramount' in the world of motion pictures 
and at the same time of maintaining in our 
department of distribution a real human 
family where men are interested as much 
in the helpful effort of one for the other 
as in achieving dollars and cents results." 



Irving Lesser on Tour 

Irving M. Lesser, vice-president of Prin- 
cipal Pictures Corporation in charge of dis- 
tribution has left New York for New Orleans 
where he will confer with his brother, Sol 
Lesser, president of Principal Pictures, and 
MUe Rosenberg, secretary of the company, 
regarding the future plans for the organiza- 
tion. Principal has an elaborate program in 
sight. 



Marion, Jr., Titling- 

George Marion, Jr., son of the noted stage 
star of the same name, has replaced Darryl 
Francis Zanuck as scenarist of the "Tele- 
phone Girl" series for F. B. O. Marion is 
also titling these gems of comedy which are 
being directed by Mai St. Clair and which 
feature Alberta Vaughn. 




Scene* from Arrow'* new serial, "Day* of '49," 



Selling thePiOURE to the Public 

EDITED BY EPES WINTHROP SARGENT 



Harrison Makes His Hook-up Page Aid 

in Gaining Big Poster Window Display 



EVEN now there are still new angles to 
the hook-up or co-operative page. 
J. P. Harrison, of the Hippodrome 
Theatre, Waco, Texas, has found a new and 
very useful angle to the old stunt. He uses 
it as the basis of a poster display, though 
it was not announced as 9uch. 

His first stunt was to tie the News- 
Tribune to the idea by letting that news- 
paper present the idea. Then he got eleven 
advertisers, one for each of the letters form- 
ing the word Scaramouche. This is the way 
the page looked : 



FREE $100.00 IN HIP 


P0DR0ME THE/ 

Jj|^er$irJe Market 

5. J FgAA&M 


ITRE TICKETS FREE! 


/5Bt&L MART 
K» PRING 
V^gk TYLF.S 

AT1SF ACTION 

*IL\ \:% i» (MS 

mwnur ua 10 ii* 
um m smi*g 

MILLINERY ~4 FOOTWEAR 

®ffi Ml 


Recounts 

CBtttHC SAVIKCS 

Accovm i™"!!!?^ 

We Welcome New Accounts 

—The 
First State Bank 
& Trust Co. 


^UlenPorterCo. 


^^Xf for the 
Bicycle Races 

HAuTnSHERJIRECO 


Repair Co. 

I f5I 


indereiia 

^ »4AS ^ 


ore to Fidift 


lUl ickle 
Studio 


(^^d Bauerle 

■m Jeweler "»*r 


llii^l' ■■■■■ Bakery 



A Metro Release 



THE CO-OPERATIVE PAGE 

The terms required the reader to "guess" 
the title of the play formed by the letters, 
assemble these in proper order to spell the 
word and to list the spaces from which each 
letter was taken. This last was to impress 
the names on the contestant's mind and give 
the merchant some return for his investment 
in space. 

The best replies were to be awarded prizes 
ranging from a three months' pass to the 
Hippodrome to a single to ten, and twenty- 
five more singles to the Victory Theatre, a 
sister house. "Neatness and cleverness" 
were to be deciding factors, and this was 
what Mr. Harrison was counting on. 

Many Clever Stunts 

A study of the large picture showing the 
drug store window in which the replies 
were posted all show that most of the en- 
trants made either a horizontal or vertical 
strip of the letters. About ninety-five per 
cent, of the entries simply eliminated them- 
selves, but there were enough of the clever 
ones to build up a display. 

The first prize went to Miss Bertha Shead, 
who easily carried off the honors with a cut- 
out doll about 16 inches high, with a dress 



of wall-paper, a real bead necklace and cot- 
ton hair. In the window cut she will be 
found comfortably nestling against Novarro's 
shirt front. 

f% 
! X*v 




A Metro Release 



THE FIRST PRIZE WINNER 

The second prize was a sheet which might 
have been used for a trade paper advertise- 
ment. The pictures are colored and the title 
is tinted. The lettering is extremely neat. 
It was submitted by Mrs. F. B. Sites. 



The third prize went to a combination of 
the letter s with a front page cutout from 

AUCTDO OlCTUOC 




BEX INCBAM S 

Scaramouch* 



RAMON NOVABBO ALCE TE«v LEW5 3TONC 




A Metro Release 

THIS WAS SECOND 

the Saturday Evening Post which was not 
very appropriate. Most of the effort was 
put in on the key sheet which accompanied 
the design, as required. 

Plenty for Show 

All told there were about forty cards 
which made a good window display, while 
the remainder served as trimming and to 
bulk on the floor of the window, which was 
just a comfortable proportion. 

These were all shown in the window of a 
drug store which promised the space for a 
three-day run. It was hard work to get 
the store to promise the window, even for 
three days, but when the management saw 
the crowd attracted by the display, plus 
front page advertisements in the newspaper, 
it asked that the exhibit be undisturbed 
until the close of the run. Naturally Mr. 
Harrison interposed no objection. 




A Metro Release 

HOW HARRISON'S DISPLAYS FILLED A STORE WINDOW 
Grudgingly granted for a three day display, the "Old Corner Drug Store" asked that 
the exhibit be kept until the end of the engagement because of the large crowds 
attracted by the display and the mention the newspaper gave to the exhibition. 



74 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Production Hints from Edward L. Hyman 

Managing Director, Mark-Strand Theatre, Brooklyn 



The single stunt presents many angles, all 
of which are good. In the first place it gave 
a page display to a title which would profit 
from extra advertising. 

Then it hooked the newspaper to consid- 
erable front page publicity, mostly in the 
form of two or three inch singles. 

It got a window for more than a week 
for an exhibit of such interest that people 
stood before it for five to fifteen minutes 
instead of giving the usual passing glance, 
and it gave point to other advertising 
angles. 

Other Ideas 

In addition to this stunt Mr. Harrison 
worked the book hook-up, used the largest 
mailing list he has ever sent out and made 
a distribution of tagged lifesavers to the 
office buildings. In the book store he used 
an electrically lighted sign on a triple flasher 
which brought out the words "Rex Ingram's 
Scaramouche" one word at a time, impress- 
ing each word separately, with better effect 
than where the entire line is flashed at once. 

And finally the head of the English De- 
partment in the Waco high schools urged 
every pupil to see the picture. 

It put it over so well that there was not 
a single complaint at the advanced prices 
and a crowded business through the en- 
gagement. 

Antique Exhibit a 
Scaramouche Help 

J. M. Edgar Hart spread himself on Scara- 
mouche. He made the usual taxi hook-up, 
which is almost standard on this title, and 
he went much further. 

His best bet was a display of antiques in 
the window of a prominent dry goods store, 
the exhibit being sponsored by one of the 
local papers. Most of the exhibits were 
Mexican, but there were old samplers, a 
cane, a very old painting and several arti- 
cles of jewelry. 

There was sufficient to give a comfortably 
full window and each object was numbered 
to correspond with a catalogue placed on 
either side. This insured a proper display 
for the entries, none of the small objects 
l;c ng obscured by explanatory cards, while 
at the same time ample explanation was 
given. 



IN striking contrast to the previous 
week, when only the picture and a short 
prologue were given, the line-up with 
Richard Barthelmess in "The Enchanted 
Cottage" covered seven incidents, three of 
which were film and four music. The fea- 
ture itself ran one hour and twenty minutes, 
while the comedy, "My Friend'' (Pathe), 
took up twenty minutes, and the Topical Re- 
view seven minutes. The whole show was 
two hours and ten minutes in length. 

In keeping with Holy Week there was a 
stage number using "The Palms" (Faure), 
with women's chorus of ten, a soprano and 
six girls in pantomime. The other musical 
numbers were balanced between instrumen- 
tal, vocal and ballet to round out a program 
of great variety. These presentations took 
up, altogether, twenty-three minutes. 

"The Palms" was set with a huge church 
window back drop, a transparency behind 
which were deep orange open box lamps. To 
left and right were double rows of palms, 
with five singers to a side. Dancers were 
posed as angels and a Madonna, apparently 
part of the window design but coming to 
life in pantomime during the singing of the 
song. The set lighting was light blue, me- 
dium blue and deep blue. This number took 
four minutes. 

The overture was Friedman's "Slavonic 
Rhapsody," eight minutes, with the follow- 
ing lighting: Color blend Mestrum flood of 



The lobby display offered a characteristic 
fleur-de-lys design, but showed a different 
from usual treatment, the medallion portraits 
being worked in between the points instead 
of on the petals, as is usually done. Gutier- 
rez writes his own tickets on art work. 
Generally he can beat the suggested designs. 
Between them they got out a very satisfac- 
tory front to back up the exploitation ideas, 
and Mr. Hart could pay the film rental with- 
out dipping into Louis L. Dent's bank roll. 



Poor business is a state of mind. Get your 
patrons in a better menial state by boosting 
and you will find they can spare ticket money. 



160 amperes covering entire stage from the 
booth. Magenta and dark violet floods, two, 
from the dome on the orchestra. Blue foots 
and borders large stage; red coves, light blue 
transparent columns at either side of 
proscenium. New gold draw curtains over 
production stage. 

The Scarf Dance was set with silver cyclo- 
ramic background, and a transparent fabric 
column at either side of the stage. A scrim 
was drawn across the production stage. So- 
prano soloist center stage in Egyptian cos- 
tume, and dancers huddled on the floor left 
stage, in drapes. Dancers remained prone 
during the selection, "Longing," and then as 
the soprano reclined upon a plush draped 
couch back-stage, arose for the Scarf Dance. 
This number, which took up seven minutes, 
was lighted as follows : Vari-colored spots 
from the sides on the set ; deep violet floods 
from the booth on the musicians, blue bor- 
ders, inside strips blue, one green cove and 
one blue. 

Estelle Carey, soprano, sang "The Call of 
Maytime" (Brahe) on the large-stage apron. 
The time was four minutes and the lights 
included deep violet flood from the dome on 
the orchestra. Light pink spot from the 
booth on the singer. Blue borders, one blue 
cove and one green, lights on one-half. In- 
side strips blue. 

The organ recessional was Wagner's 
"Tannhauser March." 



Passes for Tickets 

Because the local street railway company 
had just put into use a commutation ticket 
system on its interurban section, Cliff Den- 
ham, who runs the First National pictures in 
Victoria, B. C, got a lot of advertising. 

Very simple. He just told the traction 
company that their tickets would be good 
for Thursday matinees at the Victoria dur- 
ing April and the magnates did the rest. 

It not only helped business for the Vic- 
toria, but it made business on off days for 
the storekeepers, for those who came into 
town to the matinee did their shopping at 
the same time. 




A Metro Release 



AN ANTIQUE DISPLAY HELPED SCARAMOUCHE OVER IN THE PALACE, EL PASO 
J. M. Ec!gar Hart tied a dry goods store and the Herald to a loan exhibition of antiques, mostly Mexican. Fifty-two entries were 
made, and the display attracted crowds, for it was well worth looking at. Cards on either side explained the numbered object*. 
The other side of the picture shows the lobby fleur-de-lys design originated by F. C. Gutierrez, the staff artist. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



75 




A Fox Release 

A CLEVER DESIGN FOR A WINDOW CARD ON IF WINTER COMES 
This was designed by J. P. Harrison, of the Hippodrome Theatre, Waco, Texas, and 
his assistant, George Cowart. You can get some idea of the size through comparison 
with the hats on either side. The lettering is exceptionally good. 



He Should Worry 

When Thomas G. Coleman does not get 
his advertising he does not go down cellar 
for a good cry. 

F'rinstance he could get no accessories on 
Judgment of the Storm at the Galax Thea- 
tre, Birmingham, Ala. 

He persuaded a women's club to have a 
benefit. Sold them special tickets at the 
full box office prices but these specials were 
extra priced so that the club could bank the 
difference. 

They got a booth on one of the chief cor- 
ners in the business district and Coleman 
very kindly painted some advertising cards 
for them to decorate with. They made 
money. He made money. But how about 
the F. B. O. accessories department? 



Don't despise old stunts just because they 
are old. A good old stunt, fixed up a little 
will look as good as new. Look at your box 
■ office record. That is the test. 



Figures 

Hooking up to the stockings gave the 
Beacham Theatre, Orlando, Fla., a good busi- 
ness on The Humming Bird in spite of a 
revival meeting, which is the most deadly 
form of opposition a southern house can 
encounter. 

The familiar window display was used, 
with a single stocking sustaining an eighty 
pound weight, with a liberal display of stills 
and cards. A single pass was given each 
purchaser. 

Some 350 passes were turned in at the 
box office, mostly with one or more paid 
admissions, and there was a five-day crowd 
about the window. The store did an ex- 
ceptional business, and the Beacham did 
much better than it had any right to ex- 
pect under the circumstances. It paid all 
the way around. 



Now is the time to look after the fans and 
bloivers. Don't wait until patrons begin to 
complain of the heat. 



Revamped Stunt is 
a New Money Maker \ 

Good stunts never die. Putting a hair- ' 
dresser in the lobby to bob hair free is a 1 
bit frayed on the edges, but the Pola Negri \ 
curl is new, yet it's the old bobbed hair » 
stunt all over again. That and nothing , 
more. 

Howard Waugh, of the Palace Theatre, ( 
Memphis, who has more good ideas than an ' 
alley cat has fleas, had Pola Negri. He had 
a cut with what seemed to be a new coiffure. 
He named it the Negri Curl and sold it to 
Bry's department store. 

They went 50-50 on the cost of a hair 
dresser in the lobby of the Palace and 
Waugh paid for 25,000 small dodgers which 
were wrapped into every package sent out 
by the store. To offset this printing bill, 
the store gave the theatre about 100 column 
inches in its daily and Sunday ads. 

Hair Curled Free 

The idea was that any woman who 
wanted a Pola Negri curl had only to re- 
pair to the Palace lobby, where the crimp 
would be put in her tresses in full .view of 
the public. 

The hairdresser put in a full eight hour 
day for seven days, and the crowds were 
so constant that checks had to be given out 
to ensure proper sequence. . 

It cost Waugh $27. He figures that he 
did not lose money on the proposition by a 
couple of thousand, for he oversold Shadows 
of Paris and put Pola on the map for her 
next picture, as well. 



Killed Two Birds 

J. Wright Brown, of the Grand Theatre. 
Columbus, Ga., is another to record that 
he offered prizes for the correct solution 
of The Acquittal. But the prizes were photo- 
play editions of The White Sister, rubber 
stamped with the announcement of its com- 
ing to the Grand. 

The thrill in this announcement comes 
from the fact that the winners naturally 
showed the prize to all their friends, there- 
by giving wide publicity to the coming as 
well as the current attraction. 



Naturally 

Eddie Collins had a money lobby for Ali- 
mony at the Capitol Theatre, Houston, 
Texas. 




Goldvyyn-Cosmopolitan Releases 



TWO DISPLAYS FROM THE CIRCLE THEATRE, PORTLAND, SHOWING CHANGE OF PACE 
The first is for Slave of Desire, and a hide, presumably the Wild Ass' skin, is made the centrepiece. This is repeated on three out of 
four of the door panels, the other being given to the comedy. For Little Old New York, on the right, a cuto ut of Miss Davies is used 
with the silhouettes on the draperies. The house runs until 4 A. M. every day. Wonder when the manager sleeps. 



76 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Ties Money Orders 
to Marriage Circle 

Very little grass seems to be growing 
under the feet of Raymond B. Jones, pub- 
licity man for the Howard Theatre, Atlanta. 
The boy's good. No one else would think 
of hooking the American Express Money 
Orders to The Marriage Circle, but Jones 
landed them into sending out a letter which 
gave the opening paragraph to the War- 
ner Brothers-Lubitsch production at the 
Howard. 

The second paragraph added that "A good 
play is like a good vacation tour or a cruise, 
and if you are planning a vacation trip" why 
you needed their Travel Bureau to arrange 
your tour and their money orders for ready 
cash. 

This is more or less dragging it in by the 
heels and it seems to us that a more direct 
hook would have been a suggestion that 
the acquisition of the marriage circle was 
generally followed by a honeymoon which 
the company could arrange. It would still 
have the same selling value to those not con- 
templating immediate matrimony and at the 
same time would have shown a closer link. 

Another mailing piece was a neat looking 
announcement card in which "You are cor- 
dially notified'' that the picture is to be 
shown. This was done in a neat, but not 
too ornamental face with "bond" ink, which 
gives the copper plate effect without the 
cost of cutting a plate. Jones figured that 
this would attract the better class of per- 
sons who would most fully enjoy the 
sprightly little farce, delicate as a Strauss 
operetta. He avoided the usual ballyhoo and 
held to stunts which would not cheapen 
the title, with a teaser newspaper campaign 
for his best extra bet. He also arranged 
for wedding ring displays in the better class 
jewelers' windows. 



A Lady Strongheart 

To advertise The Love Master at the 
Regent and Blackstone Theatres, Pitts- 
burgh, P. C. Weller, of the Rowland and 
Clark staff, loaned one of his police dogs, 
which was paraded with a leader in the 




A First National Release 

AN AUSTRALIAN SIGN 125 BY 10 
It is the front of the railway station and 
C. C. Jones, of the First National, gathered 
Haymarket and Hoyts, but has an effect 

uniform of a R. N. W. M. P. It got by all 
right, but the pup's front name was Lora, 
and we think that Milt Crandall came close 
to the "this is no bull" stunt. 

Anyhow Lora got as much attention as 
Strongheart himself could have commanded, 
and made just as much business. 



By the Block 

Most Southern cities have permanent 
awnings on their store fronts, often the 
underside of the second story piazza or 
gallery. In the block with the Isis Theatre, 
Houston, there is almost an unbroken cov- 
ering, and when Black Oxen came to town 
the management arranged to place signs 
at ten foot intervals the entire length of 
the block, getting a cumulative effect in 
front of the theatre itself. Here the entire 
front was lavishly decorated with about 
everything in the way of paper that First 
National could supply. 



Two Styles 

Appreciating the value of the picture 
hook-up, the Macauley Company, publishers 
of the photoplay edition of Three Weeks 
supply two styles of jacket, to give variety 
to the window dressing. One shows the 
heroine on the famous tiger skin rug 
against a red ground, while the other shows 
a scene from the picture with the hero 
thrown in for good measure. Working the 
two together gives more color to a solid 
window. 




A First National Release 

EXPLOITATION ON CIRCUS DAYS FROM JOHANNESBURG, S. A. 
Three clowns, four white circus horses, a bannered wagon and marked wheels all helped 
to convey the circus idea to the inhabitants of Jo'burg, and helped to make Jackie 
as much of an attraction in South Africa as he is in the States. A little crude, but good. 



FEET IN SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA 
has long been coveted by sign users, but 
it in under contract. It not only helps the 
on later business at the suburban houses. 

Memory Test 

Here's a good one from Guy Kenimer, of 
Jacksonville. He had The Stranger and felt 
that it would be better for a light running 
mate, yet he did not want to inject a slap- 
stick comedy. 

Instead he played a medley of one-time 
popular airs and giving tickets to all who 
could name the entire program in the order 
in which it was played. 

This looks like a terrible waste of tickets, 
yet there were a couple of not too popular 
airs to keep the list of winners down, and 
comparatively few passes were given. The 
passes, of course, were matinee singles. 



No Dope 

Envelopes purporting to contain "The 
Wonder Cure. The Great Discovery of the 
Age," were distributed by Loew's State The- 
atre, Los Angeles, when Her Temporary 
Husband was shown at that house. The 
small print told the recipient to mix the en- 
closure "with a little consideration." 

Inside was a slip telling that laughter was 
the sure cure for all ills and that the most 
effective ingredient of laughter was, of 
course, Her Temporary Husband. It was 
done in pseudo prescription form. 



Free Hunchback Ads 

Hooking a local paper to an advertising 
writer's contest gave the Rialto Theatre, 
Fort Worth, Texas, a basket of free pub- 
licity. Cash and ticket prizes were offered 
daily for the best written advertisements for 
the play, and these were set up and printed, 
with the result that the theatre got a lot 
of advertisements for very little money and 
the newspaper had a useful circulation stunt 
that cost it nothing but the space. It's not 
new, but it is new if you have never done it. 



Good Radio Hook- Up 

Harry D. Wilson has tied to the Los 
Angeles Examiner for a Baby Peggy ex- 
ploitation. The Examiner runs a broadcast- 
ing studio and replies with a card of thanks 
to all "applause." Wilson persuaded them to 
illustrate the card with a picture of Peggy 
listening in on a loud speaker, with a cap- 
tion "Little Baby Peggy listening in." 

As thousands of these cards are mailed 
out weekly, even to points in the East and 
Canada, the exploitation is widespread, and 
all it cost was the taking of the photograph, 
plus Wilson's winning ways 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



77 



Broke Window Record 
on Scaramouche 

Cliff Lewis, advertising man for the Strand 
Theatre, Syracuse, N. Y., writes that he got 
29 windows for Scaramouche, including the 
largest book store and the leading depart- 
ment concern, not to mention a floral display 
that is almost an art-study. 

All of the windows strike a happy medium 
between the overstuffed display and the 
showing of half a dozen books. The win- 
dows are not too full, yet they give the im- 
pression of bigness. This is largely a ques- 
tion of locality. Some populations respond 
better to the big appeal than to the lesser 
display. Others get the best impression from 
a more restrained exhibit. The book store 
let in the Scaramouche display though it had 
never before tied to a theatrical attraction, 
and this added to the general effect. 

Walter McDowell, managing director, 
worked with Mr. Lewis in planning the dis- 
plays. 

Another good stunt was the provision of a 
pass for every classified advertiser for two 
days in the leading paper. This brought a 
cross-page strip four inches deep for Boy o' 
Mine, two insertions, and the paper was al- 
ready hooked to a "Who is the Meanest 
Man in the World?" contest. The passes 
were singles, and while a number were given 
out, it was Lent and there were some spare 
seats for the holders and the paid admis- 
sions they brought with them. 

The contest brought more than 1,000 lines 
of free copy. 

Eating up the roto space has become al- 
most a habit. Scaramouche won an entire 
page and The White Sister took almost half 
a page. 



This Strip Banner 

Saves by a Figure 

What might have been an ordinary ban- 
ner on Black Oxen was made into some- 
thing else by the Hippodrome Theatre. 
York, Pa. 

The banner proper was a strip about four 
feet high, with cutouts from the one-sheet 
on either side of the title, date on one ex- 
treme end and star names on the other. 
This was raised about ten feet from the 
sidewalk. 

What made it something different was a 
cutout figure from the 24-sheet mounted and 
placed partly above and partly below the 
banner. This gave a distinction to the en- 
tire display and provided a touch suggestive 
of the importance of the offering. 

A pair of sixes, two ones and a three were 
also used, but this single banner was ample 
to get the attention. 



Jailbirds Helped 

Because the state prison had the only yoke 
of black oxen in town, H. C. Farley went to 
jail for his advertising, though he was not 
jailed, if you get the idea. He just bor- 
rowed the pair and let them tell the town 
that Corinne Griffith would presently come 
to town. 

Then Farley noticed that the book store 
was advertising the photoplay edition at 75 
cents, and he persuaded the newspaper to 
give good space to an announcement that 
this was the price of the book, but that the 
tickets were still the usual 35 cents. This 
was a free story and helped both the thea- 
tre and the store. 

And finally he arranged with the State 
Fair to stage its regular Fashion Show for 
two days as part of the attraction. It all 
helped to make for considerable extra 
business. 



Just One Line 

Most of the selling on Anna Christie at 
the Knickerbocker Theatre, Nashville, Tenn., 
was done with one line from the titles. A 
sign just above the electrics read "Ain't J 
told you a million times that I hate men. ' 
This was surmounted by the head of Miss 
Sweet, and the combination sold the public 
on the idea the story must be worth while. 




A Metro Release 

THREE SPLENDID WINDOW DISPLAYS ON SCARAMOUCHE FROM THE STRAND, SYRACUSE 
The florist's window forms an admirable setting for pretty Alice Terry' s painting, but the two book windows are harder working, and 
that on the left shows the first photoplay edition tie-up in th e most exclusive book store in town. Both are fine examples of book 
placement in a medium between the small display window and the usual overcrowded displays. 



I 



78 



M O V 1 N G PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



He Sold Scaramouche 
on Four Day Notice 

Scaramouche is one of those productions 
for which good preparation should be used, 
but H. B. Clarke, of Greenville, S. C, had 
only four days notice that the picture would 
come to him. 

He rushed out a bunch of snipes and had 
his porters help the regular bill posters and 
then hurried out invitations for a special 
showing on Sunday evening, the picture 
opening Monday. It was a combination 
society-newspaper affair that brought him 
plenty of verbal advertising and two editor- 
ials for Monday with special stories for each 
of the four days of the engagement. 

He used only heads in his advertising, be- 
cause costume plays are not popular in 
Greenville just now, and while the early 
audiences told the rest of the town that 
it was a costume play, they added, "but not 
like the others," so that didn't matter. 

Short notice made him work so hard that 
he put it over as well as though he had 
time for a longer campaign. 




Traitor! 

Jack Fuld, who promotes Principal Pic- 
tures, went out to put over When a Man's 
a Man for the Strand Theatre, Detroit. And 
what do you suppose he did? 

He printed cards to the effect that when 
a man's a man he gives up his seat in the 
street car to a woman. And he pasted these 
on the car windows. 

More 1 

There was a top line which read : "Ladies. 
If you are unable to obtain a seat, show 
this card to some man." 

What'll we do with him? Right! At 
Sunrise. 



A Metro Release 

A CLASSY LOBBY FOR MAE MURRAY IN FASHION ROW 
This was planned by R. L. Towns, of the Strand Theatre, Birmingham, Ala., with 
posters built up from cutout material and nicely reassembled. Two things we 
particularly like are the figures above the title and the light colored posters. 



His Own Publisher, 

Arthur W. Pinkham, of the Park Theatre, 
Bangor, Maine, did not let the fact that The 
Girl of the Golden West is not a novel stop 
him from using the walking book. He fig- 
ured out that if it wasn't, it should be, so 
he sent out the book, and as the idea was 
new in Bangor, it did as well as though it 
were in all the libraries. 



Don' I ignore accessory material, 
change it to suit your need. 



You 




Trademark Design 
Built Up a Lobby 

Adopting an arbitrary design for Painted 
People, the Rivoli Theatre, Portland, Ore., 
used a dozen or so for lobby decoration and 
got a distinctive display in a lobby that is 
hard to dress because it is long and narrow. 

The design was a circle with a rim of 
knobs of various sizes and shapes, looking 
not unlike a wire gauge, though on a larger 
scale. These were all black with white let- 
tering, and at the far end of the lobby was 
a cartoon sketch with the design and a sil- 
houette figure which was putting the finish- 
ing touches on the design. 

Gave Class to Lobby 

The result was distinctive and original and 
made the lobby look like a special attraction 
front. 

The posters were held to the rear and in 
front were all the stills they could get on 
Colleen Moore in Painted People, and each 
frame had a silhouette design at the bottom. 
There was only one large title, spread on 
a banner across the front. 

In a way it was a modification of Lacy s 
famous black and white lobby, but it is mor^ 
simply done and gives surprisingly good re- 
sults. 



.1 Metro Release 

A SPECIAL MARQUISE FOR SCARAMOUCHE FROM MUSKOGEE 
Ollie Brownlee, of the Palace Theatre, covered the sidewalk with a special awning 
for the Ingraham masterpiece. The structure resembles the old mosques which were 
used on Otis Skinner in Kismet a couple of years ago. They can come back. 



Red Ink 

Arthur W. Pinkham, of the Park Theatre, 
Bangor, Maine, used the red ink extra in 
a little different fashion. Instead of trying 
to beat out the afternoon paper, he over- 
printed the morning edition and distributed 
these red imprints to the mill workers is 
they came from work at noon and in the 
evening. 

In default of an evening edition this looked 
like an extra to announce "Murder 1 Loot! 
Gems!" until you bumped into the advice to 
see Drims of Jeopardy at the Park. In 
Bangor the stunt was still new. There are 
such places yet, but few of them. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



79 



Called It the Bunk 
People Flocked In 

William Woodfall made an appeal to the 
perversity of human nature and won. He 
had The Breathless Moment booked for the 
People's Theatre, Butte, Mont., and instead 
of the usual praise, he ran this single five 
inches : 



PEOPLES THEATER 



Today and Tomorrow 

The Breathless Moment 

It's the Bunk! It's the Bunk! 

I had a preview of " Breathless Moment a" a few 
nights ago and invited a number of my friends 
to see same. 

After the picture was over, some time about 
morning, I aske.d my friends how they liked it. 

Well, I sure was surprised when someone said 
excl'npt; another, vcr*. verv good; another en- 



joyed it immensely and others were loud In their 
praise. 

But my opinion of this picture is that lf» the 
bunk. 

Of course, if everybody in this world thought the 
same about things we would be in an awful rut, 
wouldn't we? 

T haye a contract on this picture, consequently I 

have to run it. 
If you care to come and see it I hope and trust 
you'll enjoy it, I didn't. 

WILLIAM WOOLFALL, Mgr. 

Children 10c Adults 20c 



ATTENTION! MRS. JENNIE DUFFY 
If you care to sec this picture, there's a pass at the Box 
Office for you and your friends. 



4 Universal Release 

THE CONTRARY AD 

No one believed him. Instead they came 
in unusual numbers, attracted by the unusual 
appeal and seemingly anxious to prove him 
a prevaricator. You can't do this very often, 
but it's a knockout one time. 



Milt Crandall Tells 
Why Men Leave Home 

Milt Crandall, or someone on his staff, 
has turned out a gem of an advertisement 
on Why Men Leave Home. This is a por- 
tion of the three feature space used for the 
Rowland & Clark theatres, Pittsburgh, and 
it held the middle position of the three, but 
you saw it first because it was the best. 
Perhaps in some towns this would not be so 
good, but in Pittsburgh pepple are not nar- 
row minded and the suggestion of the cut 
does not offend as it might in some small 
town. It just gets a laugh without sending 
the W. C. T. U. or the Y. W. C. A. into 
spasms of denunciation. It is clever, genu- 
inely clever. This particular section of the 
advertisement takes 50 lines across three, 



not a very extravagant space, yet a regula- 
tion sketch four times the size would sell 
the picture no better. It is not often that 
a picture can be so well sold with such a 
minimum of drawing, but when it does hap- 
pen it is worth while. The idea was orig- 
inated for the 24-sheet posters, but Milt 
seems to be the only one to realize that it 
makes just as good a newspaper advertise- 
ment. It's good work because it shows that 
Milt has vision. He can see how to adapt 
an idea and make it even better than in the 
original. 



Keeps Type Away 

From Cat Spaces 

The chief feature of this 105 by 3 from 
Loew's Palace Theatre, Washington, D. C, 
is the manner in which the type is held away 
from the edges of the book. It would have 
been possible to have notched the cut more 
closely and to have set in the type almost 
flush with the edge of the book, and to have 




A First National Release 

GIVING THE CUT A CHANCE 

done so would have spoiled more than half 
the display value of the cut. Most of the 
selling is done within the cover of the book. 
The rest is merely supplemental to the chief 
appeal and should not encroach. If you 
can imagine these type lines run over until 



they touch the book, you will see that not 
only will these lines lose their value but 
that they will then kill to a large extent the 
sales value of the title and the talk which 
supplements it. This is a nice example of 
doing a thing the right way, and the space 
gets over in spite of rather poor cut work. 
There is too much black in the figure of the 
rider, and it blots up. 



Extensive Space 

Is Poorly Used 

For a second week, the Circle Theatre, 
Cleveland, takes a 150 by 4 for The Mar- 
riage Circle, apparently copying a press book 
design with "Eve started it" to alibi the nude 
figure on the left, and "Woman has been at 
it ever since" to explain the situation on 
the right. In between is a triangle, though 



/STARTED 1 BEEN i~ 



STARTED 

//-/;-'T 



BEEN AT IT 

z&Mss&s^s-* ever sinceT^ 



ilMikWi "She STORY - 

S MANS WIFE 
J AND HIS 
I BEST 
FRIEND 



A 

AND- 




Emerson Gill's Orchestra 



A Warner Brothers Release 

NOT CHARACTERISTIC 

this is not a triangle but a quadrangle. Ap- 
parently the triangle has been put in to get 
the reverse for contrast, but it does not aid 
much in the matter of gaining attention and 
we think that the cut does not help at all. 
The cream of the space goes to Emerson 
Gill and his orchestra. It is a weak seller 




PENN & HIGHLAND 



WHY MEN 
LEAVE HOME, 




From the Avery Hopwood Success 

No Laughing Matter! But a Picture 

Full of laughs. Every girl in iove should see this picture. 
Lewis Stone — Helene Chadwick — Mary Carr 



Of 

Course, 
It's a 
First 

National 



A First National Release 

MILT CRANDALL'S ADAPTATION OF THE 24-SHEET 



80 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



for one of the sprightliest farces of the sea- 
son. Probably the picture will roll along on 
its own momentum. Certainly it will derive 
little assistance from this display. Straight 
type for the second week would have been 
better than this, but the conventions seem 
to require a cut, and the result is so con- 
ventional that it does not sell. When the 
excellence of this production forms so large 
a percentage of the talking point, it is a 
pity that the space did not give more atten- 
tion to this angle. 



Splits the Space 

for Greater Effect 

Playing the rebuilt Valentino Universal 
along with Sporting Youth, the Century 
Theatre, Baltimore, gives the proper valua- 
tion, placing Valentino's name at the top, 
but giving the second title the greater prom- 
inence. In this way the Valentino name is 
capitalized without losing the value of Sport- 
ing Youth as the real feature, which is about 




A Universal Release 

SPLITTING THE HONORS 

the right way to handle this subject. It is 
largely a matter of Valentino's name. Give 
the play too much space and people will ex- 
pect more than they get, but if you merely 
advertise Valentino you can deliver the 
goods and then go on to make good with 
the story in the other play, whatever it may 
be. The combination gives rather a full 
space, but the advertisement is not really 
overcrowded. 



Duluth Display Is 
Deep, but Effective 

Dropping nearly seventeen inches down 
three columns, we think this display by W. 
H. Lawrance for the Garrick Theatre, Du- 
luth, Minn., is a bit wasteful, but it is cer- 
tainly effectively planned, and it may be 
that Miss Griffith's picture is worth the cost 
of the space it takes. The top line is a good 
reference to her recent hit in Black Oxen. 
In most of the displays we have seen for 
Lilies of the Field there is an unusual allow- 
ance of white space, and this holds true in 



the present instance. The panel is invitingly 
open, and Mr. Lawrance gets a far better 
display with eight and ten point lines than 
he could achieve with eighteen point with 




THE LOVERS OF "THE COMMON LAW" AND 
"BLACK OXEN" IN THEIR FINEST PORTRAYAL 



iRIPPITH HE 

SUPPORTED hy- Aim * Bennett 

Conway tearle ™>»h— 

Si 

T T T 1 E S 

FIEI> D 



OVERTURE 

LAVICK'S GARRICK ORCHESTRA SUPREME 



^^gOU* STARTS TODAY 




A First National Release 

DEEP, BUT GOOD 

the entire area filled. There are just a three 
line bank for the explanation and two lines 
for the selling talk, and all of it in upper 
and lower case. Note how much better the 
cast looks in upper and lower. It gives 
three times the emphasis that all capitals 
would give, and gets them in nicely. Law- 
rance was taking some chances with such 
a fine screen halftone, but he probably knew 
it would reasonably be safe with his papers, 
but for the rest he has produced a display 
that nothing short of a "batter'' could spoil. 
He generally gives us good work, but we 
think this is the most intelligent handling 
he has yet sent in. We even like that seal 
for the added attraction, though it looks 
like a cross section of a horse chestnut burr. 
But that's no disgrace. It gets attention 
because you don't know what it is, where a 
circle might pass unnoticed. It's a lot of 
space to buy, but it's something in return 
for the money, and a lot more than is bought 



with the average layout. If you have the 
all capital habit — or if your printer has — 
look this over and think it over. See how 
much more sightly it is, and then make your 
own advertisements look the same way. 



A Simple Layout 

Is Well Handled 

There is nothing especially distinctive 
about this three tens from the Colonial The- 
atre, Indianapolis, but it is a good example 
of a conventional layout, and Heaven be 
praised! it does not refer to Kerrigan as 
the lead in The Covered Wagon. It is re- 
produced to show a good following of a 
simple layout that does not call for art work 
to give a pictorial suggestion since the cuts 



JWarren 

Kerrigan 

in Gew« Ban/lfXaldieoris 
\ 





The Man From 
Brodnejft' 



RICH, warm ro- 
mance of India seas 
— A young American, 
tangled in court intrigue, 
put to the supreme test 

HU u/'lducy __Th e mystery element 

holds one in breathless 

suspense — You'll find 
m this offering delightfully 
[ *" > flly entertaining. 

AMERICAN HARMONISTS 





MDuPonif KLODY SEXTETTE H^nKey 

Colonial 

A Vitagraph Release 

SIMPLE YET EFFECTIVE 



could probably have been supplied by the 
exchange, though this appears to be the the- 
atre's art work. And since the artist has 
been on the job it is almost miraculous that 
he consented to let the printer have a look 
in. We should like to meet an artist like 
this, or should it be the man who holds him 
down At any rate, with some of the letter- 
ing done by hand, the essential selling talk 
is set in real type. The capital letter in this 
section should have been moved down to 
line with the third line instead of the first. 
That is why the first three lines are indented. 
It's not an important matter, either for looks 
or selling, but it is something to remember 
next time. We think that with an action 
picture such as this release, a better use of 
art work would have been one of the many 
striking scenes. This would do very nicely 
for a society play, but The Man from Brod- 
ney's is so full of striking action that a spir- 
ited cut would have been more in keeping 
with the nature of the story. 



Send in your good all type ads. We ivant 
to shoiv more of these. 




WITH THE ADVERllSING BRAINS 

AWeekly discussion of The New; unusual^Novelin promotion aids 



Contests and Lotteries 

BECAUSE of its interest and importance 
to exhibitors we reprint the following 
from the F. B. O. News : 

"The F. B. O. News has received a num- 
ber of letters from both newspaper editors 
and theatre managers suggesting that the 
laws governing contests and lotteries be 
outlined in the department. The idea is a 
good one, as exhibitors especially are un- 
familiar with the post office regulations and 
interstate commerce rulings by which lot- 
teries are governed. 

"Lottery" Defined 

"Lottery" 'has been denned as "a scheme 
for the distribution of prizes by lot or 
chance; a game of hazard in which small 
sums of money are ventured for the chance 
of obtaining a larger value, in money or 
other articles." 

Many exhibitors are under the impres- 
sion that there is no lottery when no money 
is paid to participate in the chance to win a 
prize. It is true there is no lottery when 
there is no consideration, but a consideration 
may consist in the rendering of services. 




The two-column illustration furnished in the 
"Mademoiselle Midnight" press book to_ ac- 
company a gown designing contest outlined 
in Metro's press sheet on this Mae Murray 
feature. A good stunt. 



CONDUCTED BY BEN H. GRIMM 

Exploitation Men — 
Read This: 



Moving; Picture World has spe- 
cial facilities for co-operating 
with you in helping to promote 
and to effect national tie-ups on 
your stars and your pictures. 
These facilities are at your service. 

Let us know about the tie-ups 
you already have made — We know 
we can help on those; let us know 
about the tie-ups you are trying 
to put through — we think we can 
help you on those. 

LETS GET TOGETHER!— 
[Ed.] 



The obtaining of names for a mailing list 
would probably act as a consideration, and 
in some cases even searching for a prize 
or "buried treasure" may act as a consider- 
ation. 

Free Admissions 

An admission to your theatre though it be 
free will act as a consideration. Many thea- 
tre managers are under the impression that 
if all entries into a contest of chance are 
to receive a full return for their money, 
that the plan is legal. This is not the case. 
If by any chance some purchasers receive 
more than others, the scheme is lottery. 

The fundamental law governing lotteries 
is simple and any showman can avoid 
trouble by adhering to the following prin- 
ciple : 

The distribution of the prize or prizes 
offered must be determined only by skill 
or good judgment. 

"Luck" Is Out 

In other words, the winner must be able 
to do something better than other contest- 
ants to have the scheme avoid lottery. He 
or she must be able to answer a certain 
set of questions better than the average per- 
son, be fleeter of foot, or have better ability 
than others in hunting prizes or "lost treas- 
ure;" this principle is violated if there is 
any opportunity for "luck" to win over skill. 

In addition to the federal laws and mail 
regulations, most states prohibit lotteries 
by their own laws and constitutions. 

Get This Booklet 

Ask your postmaster to obtain for you a 
copy of "The Postal Laws and Regulations of 
the United States." This booklet will tell you 
the laws governing the different postal regu- 
lations; the rates enforced for different 



classes of mail; under what class typewritten 
and carbon copies of letters are placed; laws 
covering circulars, tags, wrappers, and en- 
velopes. Many theatres have used coupons. 
Some advertising "This coupon and 5c will 
admit you to the first episode of 'The Truth 
About Perpetual Motion,' at the Hokum 
Theatre." Paragraph 7, Section 462 of his 
book covers the subject of coupons. Read it. 



Vitagraph's Roto 

VITAGRAPH has just issued a most at- 
tractive campaign book for Whitman 
Beimel's "Virtuous Liars." It is made up as 
a rotogravure magazine and illustrated with 
scenes from the picture, reproductions of the 
posters, and line and screen cuts of the 
players. The cover is a photographic re- 
production of Edith Allen, leading feminine 
player. 



"Mah Jong" 

II is not often that a two-reeler distributed 
on the Independent market is given the 
send off of a press sheet of any consequence. 
"The Mysteries of Mah Jong," distributed 
by Arrow, is given the backing of a two- 
color, four-page press sheet planned by J. K. 
Adams. 

It is just as complete as one would want 



It IS a Triumph! 




L.IASKY I 



CECIL BDeMILLES 

*TRIUM PH* 

LEATRICE JOY, RODLaROCQUE 

THE creator of "The Ten Commandment*" 
breaks hii own record for lavishnesa with 
"Triumph." The whirl of fashionable society 
and the world of modern industry moulded 
into the moat luscious acreen feast since De 
Mille'a "Male and Female" and "Man- 
slaughter." 



! 



Paramount't press-book art work is always 
held to a high standard. This is a sample of 
the ad. cuts available on Cecil De Mille's 
newest production. 



82 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 




Robert Z. Leonard 



MURRAY 

MADEMOISELLE 
MIDNIGHT 



A Tiffany Production 

A Metro Picture 



them are the well-known Metro National tie- 
ups. 

A particularly interesting feature is the 
gown-designing contest, which is outlined in 
detail. This stunt should sell seats. 



Twenty-four sheet that is sure to boost business. A good piece of showman's paper, 

worth posting anywhere. 



any sheet to be on a short-length feature, 
and should prove of real value to the ex- 
hibitor in pushing the picture. 



"Girl Shy" Book 

PATHE'S campaign boo'< on Harold 
Lloyd's "Girl Shy" is complete in every 
detail. In its pages is to be found enough 
material for putting the picture over in any 
house from the big first run to the smallest 
"shooting gallery." 

Everything is there — posters, lobby paint- 
ings, newspaper ads., slides and other ac- 
cessories — including novelties in the shape 
of small circles of pasteboard, which can 
be bought at $1.50 per thousand and balloons 
at $20.00 per thousand. 

As stated on the cover of the book, it 
contains "Ideas, Stunts, Publicity, Sugges- 
tions, Tie-ups, Advertising." 



Metro's Newest 

METRO'S campaign book on Mae 
Murray's "Mademoiselle Midnight" is 
fully up to the Metro standard — which is 



r 




One of the novelties on "Girl Shy" '* 
a cardboard circle, 2% inches in 
diameter. Cuts show both sides. 
Price of these is $1.50 per thousand. 
Pathe release. 




saying a good deal in a few words. Besides 
the usual necessary press book material and 
the usual Metro press book features, the 
new sheets contain excellent business-getting 
exploitation suggestions. Of course, among 



Color Combination 

Reading of your request for the strongest 
two-color poster combination, I submit the 
following, writes Karoly Grosz, art director 
for Preferred: 

Yellow and black used boldly will stand 
out anywhere, at any time. On a sunny day 
the yellow reflects light while the black 
absorbs, thus making a powerful contrast. 
On dull days or in twilight yellow always 
reflects whatever little light there may be 
to the best advantage and far exceeds in 
power any other color in the spectrum. Black 
being the extreme opposite creates, obvious- 
ly, great contrast. 

The 24-sheet for the Preferred Picture, 
"The Virginian," was as good as they come 
(even though I made it) because these two 
colors predominated. 




Advance sketches of the potter* on Monty Bank* in "Racing Luck," an Associated 
Exhibitors' release. Paper conveys both the idea of thrill and comedy. This paper 

should do it* work well. 



Newest Reviews and Com menTs 



"The Circus Cowboy" 

Good Entertainment for Average Audience 
in Charles Jones' Newest Fox Feature 
Reviewed by C. S. Sewell 

Charles Jones' newest starring production 
for Fox Film Corporation is a pleasing story 
of the West, which, while it does not follow 
along the lines of the usual "western," pre- 
sents him in the familiar and congenial role 
of a cowboy. It should be welcomed by the 
star's admirers and prove a satisfactory pro- 
gram attraction in the average theatre. 

This picture contains a lot of heart interest 
in the person of a little circus girl who stands 
by the hero when his sweetheart marries 
another and he is wrongfully accused of 
murdering her step-son, and ends with the 
culmination of the romance between this 
little girl and the star in a circus where 
she is a tight rope walker and he is em- 
ployed to do cowboy stunts. 



NOW READY 
"IN THE SHADOW 

OF THE 

MOON" 

The most delightful romance 
ever filmed 
With 

DOROTHY CHAPPELL 

and an 

ALL-STAR CAST 

Released by 

Lee-Bradford Corp. 

701 Seventh Avenue, New York 



EDITED BY CHARLES S. SEWELL 



FEATURES REVIEWED 
IN THIS ISSUE 

Circus Cowboy, The (Fox) 
Cytherea (First National) 
Rejected Woman, The (Goldwyn) 
Riders Up (Universal) 
Triumph (Paramount) 
When a Girl Loves (Associated 
Exhibitors) 



There is the familiar villainy in the person 
of an animal trainer whose enmity the hero 
incurs while on an expedition to Africa be- 
cause he stops him from abusing an ele- 
phant. This man falls in love with the 
heroine and when he sees she favors the 
hero he cuts the rope on which she is per- 
forming. This is one of the thrills of the 
picture, as the star catches her as she falls. 

There are some good riding scenes where 
the star is attempting to escape from the 
sheriff's posse. This also includes a thrilling 
stunt in which he starts to go from one 
high cliff to another, hand over hand across 
a rope. The rope is cut by a bullet fired by 
the sheriff and the hero swings against the 
opposite cliff, but succeeds in making his 
getaway by climbing up the rope. 

The picture moves along at a good pace 
and there is no dragging to the action ; in 
addition there are a number of humorous 
touches, and a combination of heart-interest, 
drama, romance and melodrama, making it 
satisfactory entertainment all around for the 
average patron. 

Charles Jones is well cast as the hero and 
gives a good performance, and has several 
other stunts besides those mentioned, in- 
cluding roping and expert riding in the circus 
arena. In one scene he succeeds in subduing 
a particularly spirited horse. Marian Nixon 
is excellent as the heroine. She is attractive, 
with a charming and sympathetic personality 
which adds considerably to the appeal of the 
picture. The production has been given good 
direction by William Wellman, while Louis 
Sherwin has provided a story with several 
new twists. 



Cast 

Buck .Saxon Chnrles Jonex 

Bird Taylor Marian Nixon 

Ezra Bagley Jack McDonald 

Paul Barley Raj Hnllor 

Norma Wallace Margruerlte Clayton 

Slovini George Romain 

Story by I.ouis Shemii. 
Scenario by Doty Hobart. 
Directed by William Wellman. 
Length, 6,400 feet. 
Story 

Buck goes on an expedition to Africa for 
a couple of years and his sweetheart Norma 
agrees to wait for him. Returning, he finds 
she has married Bagley, a mean but wealthy 
man. Buck's little friend, a circus girl, Bird 
Taylor, stands by him. Norma tries to get 
Buck to elope with her. Bagley's son visits 
her to blackmail her, and Bagley, believing 
he is Buck, shoots him, blaming Buck. Buck 
escapes and joins the same circus as Bird. 
Slovini, a trainer, who is jealous, exposes 
the fact that Buck is with the circus. Bag- 
ley appears to arrest Buck, but he forces 
him to reveal the truth. Buck has learned 
to love Bird, and on being vindicated he 
takes her in his arms. 



ART TITLES 

BY 

LOUIS MEYER 

OF 

CRAFTSMEN 
FILM LAB., Inc. 

251 West 19th Street 
New York 

Phone Watkins 7620 



Use 
Powers 
Prints 



New York Office: 
POWERS BUILDING 

Cm. 4Mk St. * Smnth Av« 



POWERS FILM 

"Survives The Long Run" 

Watch its performance — Check up on its long wearing 
quality and pocket the savings — Costs no more in the 
beginning — Far less in the end. 

POWERS FILM PRODUCTS, LNC. 



They 
Last 
Longer 



Factory A Laboraiorlaa: 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



84 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



"Cytherea" 



First National Feature Based on Hergeshei- 
mer Novel Should Prove a Big Box- 
Office Attraction 
Reviewed by C. S. Sewell 

Add "Cytherea" to the list of successes 
which Samuel Goldwyn has produced for 
First National, for it contains such elements 
as a vital and interesting story forcefully 
handled, superb acting and directing, and 
other points of audience appeal that spell 
big box-office returns for the majority of 
theatres. 

Based on a widely read novel by Joseph 
Hergesheimer, one of the most popular of 
modern writers, "Cytherea" comes to you 
with a wide circle of patrons awaiting it. 
The significance of the title lies in the fact 
that it was a name which the ancient Greeks 
applied to the goddess of love. 

Frankly a story with sex as the dominat- 
ing theme, it pictures in a dramatic manner 
the swift retribution meted out to a couple 
who chose to flaunt the accepted standards 
of morality and right living. Each was 
married to a life partner of the undemon- 
strative type. The man was forty and had 
two fine children. The woman, slightly 
younger, was of an extremely exotic type. 
When fate threw them together, they al- 
lowed themselves to be carried away by the 
thought that they had previously been mis- 
mated, that they were meant for each other 
and that happiness lay in leaving the paths 
of respectability they had been following 
and going away together. But they imme- 
diately began to pay the penalty, their illu- 
sions were quickly shattered and the woman 
succumbed to an attack of fever. 

Here is a story that presented difficulties 
in filming, but they have been overcome by 
the fine team work of the scenario writer, 
director and players, and while the force of 
the theme has been maintained, and no at- 
tempt has been made to disguise it, it has 
been handled with such tact and discretion 
that there is no scene that can be consid- 
ered as offensive to good taste. 

Another difficulty arose from the fact that 
by their actions the principals would tend 
to alienate the sympathy of the spectators, 
but while the reasons which actuated them 
are shown, no attempt is made to excuse 
them or establish last minute sympathy. 
Dependence has been placed on the other 
strong angles of audience value and in reg- 
istering the thought that it is impossible to 
get away with such transgressions of the 
moral code. 

Many may feel that having the wife take 
her husband back after his affair with the 
other woman is at variance with the way a 
woman of her type would act in real life, 
and there will doubtless be criticism of the 
fact that the disillusionment and disaster 
which befell the couple was due not to any 
reawakening of conscience but to the effect 
of the almost unbearable climate and un- 
pleasant surroundings and that had they 
chosen a more alluring place conditions 
might have been different. The fact re- 



WHO WANTS HI I \KQ 
EDUCATIONAL T 1 L1YI O 

TRAVEL SCENIC 
INDUSTRIAL SCIENTIFIC 
SPORTS MAGIC 
HAND COLORED NOTABLES 

STONE LIBRARY 

220 W. 42nd St.. Roan 303 Phone 2 1 10 Chlcfcerlng 



mains, however, that here is a strongly dra- 
matic, entertaining, well-handled story that 
certainly holds the interest from beginning 
to end. A story that will appeal to both 
sexes, especially to those of more mature 
minds, possibly more strongly to women 
with its contrast in the situations of the 
wife and the other woman; a story that 
will provoke discussion, make your patrons 
talk about it and arouse the curiosity of 
others. 

This picture has been given a production 
that is high class in every respect, with im- 
pressive sets and production details, and the 
effect has been heightened by presenting 
some of the scenes in natural color by means 
of the Technicolor process. 

Too much praise cannot be given to 
Frances Marion for her scenario, George 
Fitzmaurice for his superb direction or to 
the magnificent work of the principals. 
Lewis Stone was an ideal selection for the 
herb; the same is true of Alma Rubens as 
the other woman and Irene Rich as the wife 
in a sympathetic role that will probably 
bring tears from some of the feminine 
patrons. 

Cast 

Fanny Randon Irene Rich 

Lee Randon Lewis Stone 

Peyton Morris Norman Kerry 

Claire Morris Betty Bouton 

Savina Grove Alma Rubens 

William Grove Charles Wellesley 

Mina Raff Constance Bennett 

Daniel Randon Brandon Hurst 

Butler Hugh Saxon 

Based on novel by Joseph Hergesheimer. 
Scenario by Frances Marlon. 
Directed by George Fitzmaurice. 
Length, 7,400 feet. 

Story 

Lee Randon is bored by life as he reaches 
forty. He has two lovely children and a de- 
voted wife, but she is of the old-fashioned, 
conventional type. Dancing with Claire, a 
flapper, he feels the spirit of adventure and 
when he calls on her to try and persuade 
her to give up his nephew Peyton, whose 
wife is expecting a baby, he meets her aunt, 
Savina Grove. Savina is of the exotic type, 
while her husband is undemonstrative. She 
appears to be the woman of whom he has 
dreamed while gazing at a doll he has chris- 
tened Cytherea, the goddess of love. Savina's 
husband is called away and they fall madly 
in love. Returning home, his wife learns of 
the situation and after a row he leaves 
home. Randon and Savina leave for Cuba, 
expecting to find a romantic paradise. The 
heat and surroundings disgust them and 
they are disillusioned. Savina dies. Lee re- 
turns home and his wife forgive^ him. 



MUSICIANS SHOULD FOLLOW 



JAematic Music 




Cue „SAeef> 



'Riders Up" 



Strong Human Interest and Humorous 
Touches Make This Universal Picture a 
Likeable Attraction 

Reviewed by C. S. Sewell 

Horse racing furnishes the background for 
"Riders Up," a Universal attraction and there 
is the atmosphere of the race track about the 
entire production. Practically all of the scenes 
take place in the paddock, at the trackside 
during the races or in a boarding house 
where all of the boarders are followers of the 
horses, down on their luck and continually 
hoping to pick a winner. 

The theme deals with a chap who is one of 
this lot and who keeps writing home that he 
expects to pull off a big deal and return to 
the old farm in New England, but when the 
big day finally arrives, the plight of an aged 
friend who is in hard luck so touches him 
that he uses his winnings to help him and 
gives up the trip. 

There is a pretty little romance between 



FOR PROPER PRESENTATIONS 



the hero and the landlady's daughter and 
considerable humor, and in addition un- 
usually strong heart interest with many 
delightful human touches, both pathetic and 
amusing in the plight of the hero and his 
friend and their endeavors to pick a win- 
ner. There is a pleasing optimism in the 
way they refuse to be downcast and are al- 
ways looking to "make a killing" at the 
track that will place them on easy street. 

Irving Cummings has effectively played up 
the entertaining angles of this story which 
was published in a popular magazine and 
produced a picture that because of its strong 
human interest, its racing scenes and humor- 
ous touches should prove a good attraction 
in the majority of theatres. 

The picture is portrayed by a capable 
cast headed by Creighton Hale as the hero 
and Ethel Shannon as the girl. Scarcely 
less prominent are George Cooper as his 
pal, Robert Brower as his aged friend and 
Kate Price as the landlady. All of them 
do excellent work. 

Cast 

Johnny Creighton Hale 

The Jinx George Cooper 

Mrs. Ryan Kate Price 

Jeff Robert Brower 

Xnrah Ryan Ethel Shannon 

Johnny's Mother Edith Yorke 

Based on Story' by Gerald Beaumont* 
Scennrio by Monte Brice. 
Directed by Irving Cummings. 
Length, 4,004 feet. 

Story 

Johnny, a follower of the races, keeps writ- 
ing to his mother that he expects to close 
a big business deal and return home, but 
he continues to pick losers at the track. 
Finally his pal overhears a conversation that 
enables them to pick a long shot. Johnny 
is hit by an auto and the owner gives him 
$100 to square it. With this he wins J3.000 
and plans to return home, although he hates 
to leave his sweetheart Norah. As a last 
kind deed he takes an aged friend, Jeff, to 
the track and makes it appear that his 
favorite horse "Wildfire" has won. When 
he finds Jeff has put all his savings, with 
which he expected to get enough to enter 
an old man's home, on this horse, Johnny 
uses his own money to make good. He pre- 
pares to give up the trip, but his sweet- 
heart's mother comes to his rescue and so 
he prepares to take Norah home as his wife. 



"Triumph" 



Cecil B. DeMille's Newest for Paramount 
Is Entertaining Comedy-Drama of 
Modern Life 
Reviewed by C. S. Sewell 

In "Triumph," Cecil B. DeMille's first pro- • 
duction for Paramount since filming the 
super-special, "The Ten Commandments," he 
turns to the field of modern romantic com- 
edy-drama with a story that concerns the 
career of a wealthy idler who loses his in- 
heritance aTd becomes a vagrant but 
through his own efforts finally becomes the 
president of his father's factory. It is a 
pleasing picture that the average patron will 
enjoy. 

The usual DeMille spectacular cut-backs 
are absent, there being only a couple of brief 
scenes in which the hero and his rival ap- 



May 3. 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



85 



pear as Romeo with the heroine as Juliet. 
The story follows along conventional lines 
and is of the type where everything con- 
veniently happens just as you desire them 
to, rather than in the way they usually occur 
in everyday life. When the hero is cast out 
of his fortune we see his half-brother raised 
to a position of wealth, but when the hero 
again gets on top we find the brother is 
back at the bottom of the ladder. 

There is a pleasing romance running 
through the story, in which the two brothers 
figure as rivals for the hand of the girl, a 
forewoman in the factory who achieves fame 
as a singer but loses her voice in a fire and 
finds herself back as an ordinary worker 
until the happy ending makes her the wife 
of the hero. 

While the working out of the theme is 
not altogether plausible, the picture is a 
pleasing one, with a number of good humor- 
ous touches, excellent acting and a story 
that interests even if it does not convince. 
It should prove satisfactory entertainment 
for the great majority of patrons and cou- 
pled with the value of Cecil B. DeMille's 
name and a cast of favorites, should be a 
money-maker even though it does not meas- 
ure up to the high standard of dramatic 
values of some of his other productions. 

Leatrice Joy and Rod LaRocque are ex- 
cellent in the leading roles, with Victor Var- 
coni, a newcomer from Europe, giving a 
good performance as the hero's half brother. 
The supporting cast of well-known players 
all do good work. 

Cast 

Anna Land Leatrice Joy 

King Garnet Rod LaRocque 

William Silver Victor . Varconi 

James Martin Charles Ogle 

Varinoff Theodore Koslofl 

Samuel Overton Robert Iideson 

Countess Rika Julia Paye 

David Garnet George Fawcett 

Torrlnl Spottisvvoode Aitken 

Factory Girl ZnSu Pitts 

Tramp Raymond Hatton 

Flower Girl Alma Bennett 

Painter Jimnile Adams 

Based on magazine story by May Edginton. 

Scenario by Jeanie Macpherson. 

Directed by Cecil B. DeMille. 
Length, 8,292 feet. 

Story 

Anna Land, forelady in the Garnet can 
factory, dreams of the day when she will 
sing in opera. King Garnet, an idler, the 
son of the owner of the factory, falls in love 
with her, but she turns him down, as she 
wants to make her own way and scorns him 
as a waster. King inherits the property but 
does not mend his ways. A second will pro- 
vides the fortune shall go to the factory 
manager, Silver, a half brother of King by 
a, secret marriage. Silver is an anarchist, 
but when he gets the wealth he changes into 
an arrogant snob and falls easy prey to 
schemers who deprive him of his fortune. In 
the meantime Anna has won success with 
her voice, but a fire destroys hope of her 
singing again and, discouraged, she agrees 
to marry Silver. King sunk down until he 
became a bum, but started all over in the 
can factory and finally becomes manager. 
When Silver loses out, King is made presi- 
dent and he reinstates Silver as manager. 
Silver relinquishes Anna from her promise 
and she becomes Mrs. Garnet. 



"The Rejected Woman" 

Goldwyn-Distinctive Feature with Alma 
Rubens and Conrad Nagel Offers 
Excellent Entertainment 
Reviewed by C. S. Sewell 

For its newest release through Goldwyn, 
Distinctive Pictures Corp., is presenting a 
strongly dramatic story that holds the at- 
tention from the first flash to the final fade- 



out. It should appeal to every type of au- 
dience and prove an excellent box-office at- 
traction. 

It is a virile story of the romance between 
a French-Canadian girl and a young New 
York mill ionaire. The story shows how, 
after falling in love with her in her home 
surroundings, the hero was ashamed of her 
when she came to New York, how she inno- 
cently accepted the offer of a supposed 
friend to pay the expenses to fit her to be 
the hero's wife; however, after marrying 
him the hero learns of this situation, sus- 
pects the worst and rejects her as his wife; 
and how he later learns the truth and begs 
her forgiveness. 

The story starts off as straight drama in 
the midst of effective snow scenes which 
provide opportunities for strong dramatic 
sequences and thrilling incidents. Then it 
shifts to New York with the introduction of 
the villain in the person of the supposed 
friend. This character is effectively handled 
and you are kept in suspense as to his real 
motives until the climax where it is revealed 
that his plan is to discredit the hero's wife, 
thereby gaining control of the fortune. 
From this point the action is rapid and melo- 
dramatic right up to the end, where the hero 
overcomes him in a snappy fight and takes 
the girl in his arms. 

The picture has been given an excellent 
production with scenes ranging from a snow 
covered settlement in Quebec in the dead 
of winter to the magnificent home of the 
young millionaire. The story is developed 
along out-of-the-ordinary lines; suspense is 
well maintained, as you cannot figure ahead 
what will happen next. The heroine at all 
times strongly maintains the sympathy of 
the audience and her splendid fight to win 
and hold the man she loves keeps the spec- 
tator interested. 
Conrad Nagel is effective in the role of 
the millionaire hero and Alma Rubens does 
excellent work as the heroine. Wyndham 
Standing as the villain gives a good per- 
formance, George MacQuarrie gives a force- 
ful portrayal as the stern father of the girl 
and the remainder of the cast is entirely 
adequate. 

With its intriguing title, its virile story, 
excellent acting and production values, we 
believe that you will find "The Rejected 
Woman" a thoroughly worth while attrac- 
tion that will satisfy the great majority of 
your patrons. 

Cast 

Diane DuPrez Alma Rubens 

John Leslie Conrad Nagel 

James Dunbar Wyndham Standing 

Samuel DuPrez George MacQuarrie 

Jean Gagnon Bela Lugosi 

Craig Burnett Antonio D'Algy 

Lucille Van Tuyl Leonora Hughes 

Madame Rosa Mme. La Violette 

Peter Leslie Aubrey Smith 

Ley ton Carter Fred Burton 

Story and scenario by John Lynch. 
Directed by Albert Parker. 
Photographed by Roy Hunt. 
Length, 7,7«i feet. 
Story 

John Leslie and Craig Burnett in an aero- 
plane descend in a small hamlet in Quebec, 
where John becomes fascinated by Diane 
DuPrez, incurring the enmity of Jean Gag- 
non, whom her father wants her to marry. 
News of the death of John's millionaire 
father reaches him by radio and he returns 
home. Diane's father sends her to her aunt 
in New York. John takes her to lunch but 
contrasts her dress and manners with his 
swell friends. She accepts the proposition 
of Dunbar, who is manager of John's busi- 
ness, that he will finance her trip to Europe, 
where she can fit herself to become John's 



MUSICIANS SHOULD FOLLOW 



JAematic Music 



Cue ^SAee^ 



FOR PROPER PRESENTATIONS 



wife. Returning, John again declares his 
love and when her father appears and makes 
a scene. John marries Diane. John learns 
that to inherit his father's property his wife 
must be acceptable to the trustees, and Dun- 
bar reveals the fact that he has put up the 
money for her. John, believing the worst 
rejects D'ana and she returns home. John 
learns that it was a plot of Dunbar to get 
the property and goes to Diane. Dunbar 
reaches her first. In a fight, John overcomes 
him and takes Diane in his arms. 



"When a Girl Loves" 

Every Member of the Cast a Star in This 
Associated Exhibitors' Unusual 
Feature 

Reviewed by Beatrice Barrett 

Here is an all star cast which is really all 
star, with a list of real box office pullers 
which will delight every exhibitor. No use 
in remarking that the acting is exception- 
ally good, for with these players it could 
not be anything else. 

The story covers so much ground, part 
of it laid in Russia and part in the United 
States, and moves from one thing to an- 
other so quickly that it gives the impression 
of being a much longer picture, so much is 
crowded into it. This also means that there 
is no chance for dragging but events follow 
each other quickly and dramatically. It is 
a picture which will leave the audience with 
the feeling that they have seen a big pro- 
duction. 

It starts with the scenes in Russia dur- 
ing the revolution, and there are some very 
elaborate sets, especially those in the royal 
palace, and also some good mob scenes. 
Then it follows the Boroff family to Amer- 
ica and their first efforts for making a live- 
lihood in the new land in the tenements, and 
ends in the beautiful home of Sasha and the 
complications of the love affair. Other elab- 
orate sets include those of the opera house 
where Michael is singing. 

A strong heart appeal pervades the pic- 
ture in the longing of Sasha for Michael, 
and a dominating love theme which will be 
most attractive to the audience. A little too 
much footage is given to the inventions of 
Grishka but this is forgiven when it leads 
up to the very thrilling scenes when Griska's 
invention is used to bring Michael back to 
life. 

The ending may not satisfy all, for al- 
though Michael is saved and it appears that 
everything is going to end happily, the real 
ending is left to the imagination, for Sasha 
is still married to Dr. Luke and Michael is 
still the husband of Helen, when the one 
tiling the sympathetic audience will demand 
is that Michael and Sasha be allowed to live 
their life of love together. 

Percy Marmont and Agnes Ayres divide 
the honors equally. Miss Ayres does ex- 
ceptionally well in the emotionally dramatic 
scenes and ma^es Sasha and her great love 
most appealing. Percy Marmont, as always, 
could not be improved upon. 

This is a picture for which it will be very 
easy to arrange an effective musical accom- 
paniment because the plot revolves around 
Michael's singing of "Souvenir." 

(Cast and' Story on page 87) 



The Pep of The Program 

News and reviews of ShofCT Subjects and serials 



"Cornfed" 

(Educational — Comedy — Two Reels) 

Christie's newest comedy distributed by 
Educational is a good-natured burlesque of 
a typical rube romance. There is the usual 
triangle, the store-keepers son and the bank- 
er's son both striving for the hand of the 
squire's daughter who is the village belle. 
Bobby Vernon, who is starred, is the store- 
keeper's son with Victor Rodman and Duane 
Thompson in the other roles. The rivalry 
between the boys is intense, Victor is a 
regular Beau Brummell, and Bobby is a bit 
afraid to fight. In an amusing scene he 
keeps putting chips on his shoulder which 
Victor knocks off until he is tired out and 
there is a big pile in front of him. Bobby 
finally asserts himself and when the day 
comes for the girl to wed Victor he success- 
fully frustrates it by dressing a friend of 
his as the bride. The idea of the picture 
is closely adhered to and is smoothly built 
up. There is considerable snap and many 
of the situations are of the type that have 
shown they are laugh-getters. Like the 
other recent Christie's this comedy has con- 
siderable of the rough and tumble and some 
slapstick, and it should prove a good attrac- 
tion in the majority of houses. — C. S. S. 



"Commencement Day" 

(Pathe — Comedy — Two Reels) 

Two new members have been added to 
"Our Gang," a tiny little colored tot even 
smaller than Farina, and a kid who is cast 
as the "villain" in this picture. The activi- 
ties of this bunch of little rascals, including 
all the familiar kids, are confined to the 
events taking place on the last day of the 
school year, including exercises in which the 
little girl starts to recite "Mary's Lamb" and 
ends up with the "Charge of the Light Bri- 
gade." The little fat boy starts to play the 
saxophone but freckle-faced Mickey has 
filled it with pepper and everyone sneezes. 
Everything breaks up in a riot when Farina 
falls in a well. The teacher and guests rush 
out to rescue her and the kids rough-house 
the place, throwing flour all over the place. 
The little girl has much more than usual to 
do in this number and her trained lamb does 
stunts. Although the action is not as fast 
or original as in some of the earlier issues, 
there is a lot of amusing kid stuff that will 
get a number of laughs, and "Commence- 
ment Day" should prove thoroughly enjoy- 
able to the great majority of spectators. — 
C. S. S. 



"Politics" 

(Universal — Comedy — One Reel) 

Slim and Bobby are rival candidates for 
the office of police judge in this Universal 
reel, and they use fair means and foul to 
beat each other on the theory that all is fair 
in love, war and politics. One depends on the 
use of glue and the other employs grease to 
make his opponent appear ridiculous at a 
big meeting. The result is a tie and they 
combine forces to make a get-away when the 
police raid the hall. Although the material 
is familiar, with only a couple of new 
stunts, it is amusing and this reel will rank 
as one of the best of the series. — C. S. S. 



SHORTS" REVIEWED 
IN THIS ISSUE 



Commencement Day (Pathe) 
Cornfed (Educational) 
Fun Shop, The (Educational) 
Green Grocers (Universal) 
Homeless Pups (Pathe) 
Ideal Farm (Pathe) 
Lofty Marriage, A (Universal) 
Lost Chords (Educational) 
Out Bound (Educational) 
Pathe Review No. 17 (Pathe) 
Pathe Review No. 18 (Pathe) 
Politics (Universal) 
Publicity Pays (Pathe) 
Powder Marks (Educational) 
Slippery Decks (Fox) 
Sporting Speed (Pathe) 
William Tells (F. B. O.) 



"An Ideal Farm" 

(Pathe— Cartoon— One Reel) 

In this reel, Cartoonist Paul Terry pens 
his version as to how he would speed up the 
cackles of a hen were he a barterer of eggs. 
The favorite cat discovers a plan of making 
a unionized one-egg-per-day hen go to 
work. He places her in a hen coop in which 
are a calendar and big electric bulb. Every 
time the light goes out the calendar jumps 
to another day and when the light goes on 
and the hen perceives the date, why, an- 
other egg slides into the claws of the wily 
cat. The hen finally is reduced to such size 
by overwork that she slips through a knot- 
hole and gives Mr. Cat a sound pecking 
when she finds how he was pushing her 
Father Time. It is an amusing number. — 
T. W. 



COMING 
A "HISTORIET" 

TEAPOT DOME 

(Not a Review) 
Illustrated, Animated and "Cartooniied" 
with "Multi-Color" Titles 
Something new and unusual. 

TO FOLLOW: 

"Famous Sayings of Famous Americans" 
"Witty Sayings of Witty Frenchmen" 
"Witty Naughty Thoughts" 
"Love Affairs of Famous Men" (A Series) 
ALL Our "Historiets" Are 
Illustrated, Animated and "Cartoonized" 

AND BESIDES 

Have "Multi-Color" Titles and Scenes 
"See It in Colors" 

REEL-COLORS, Inc. 

LABORATORIES, LYNDHURST 
(Art Studios and Offices) 

85 RIVERSIDE DRIVE 
NEW YORK 

Phone Endlcott 7784-7364 



"William Tells" 

(F. B. O.— Series— Two Reels) 

No. 6 in F. B. O.'s "The Telephone Girl 
Series" opens with some of the wittiest sub- 
titles, in slangy vein, ever seen on the screen, 
the work of H. C. Witwer, who wrote the series. 
They get the audience in the right mood for 
the fun that is to follow, and which waxes 
fast and furious. In this issue Gladys Mur- 
gatroyd, Sadie and the others are in gay 
Paree, stranded and very desirous of see- 
ing New York as soon as possible. The two 
girls' experiences have to do with an ex- 
waiter posing as a millionaire. Jerry and 
Jimmy, house detective and bellhop of the 
St. Moe, expose him after running foul of 
the gendarmes, and the dear U. S. seems 
further away than ever until the St. Moe 
management wires Gladys to draw on them 
for any amount and return, as business isn't 
so good with another girl at the switch- 
board. This issue is one of the best of the 
series. — S. S. 



"Green Grocers" 

(Universal — Comedy — One Reel) 

This single reel Universal comedy, starring 
Slim Summerville and Bobby Dunn, follows 
the same general lines of previous numbers 
in this series in which these two comedians 
have appeared and should prove entirely 
satisfactory to their admirers. The humor- 
ous moments center around an attempt of 
the pair to put up a stove pipe and the re- 
taliation of a neighbor who is getting the 
benefit of the smoke and turns the hose on 
them. Slim has an awful time getting the 
water out of Bobby's clothes. A pretty girl 
orders a sack of flour; each of the boys, the 
boss and all the loungers grab a sack and 
take it to her. The boys are fired and are 
blown into the air when their auto hits a 
tree. — C. S. S. 



"Out Bound" 

(Educational — Comedy — One Reel) 

Sid Smith and Cliff Bowes are the fea- 
tured players in this single reel Cameo Com- 
edy, distributed by Educational, which con- 
cerns the experiences of two chaps. One 
gets a job on a truck and with a couple of 
pieces protruding, backs into the room and 
lifts the bed out, on which the other chap 
is lying. A lot of stunts occur with the bed 
hanging over a steep cliff. Both eventually 
fall, landing in a pond, and are chased by 
alligators. These stunts are thrilling and 
exciting, and there are a lot of good comedy 
touches throughout. It is a rapid fire reel 
that should thoroughly satisfy Cameo Com- 
edy fans. — C. S. S. 



"Homeless Pups" 

(Pathe— Cartoon— One Reel) 

Paul Teiry's cartoons in Pathe's Aesop's 
Fables series are always amusing and this 
one is no exception. He pictures here the 
antics of a lot of dogs including the capture 
of one by a dog catcher. This dog's com- 
panion summons hundreds of "mutts." They 
storm the jail, rescue the fair one and get 
their revenge by tying the dog catcher to 
his own wagon and dragging him away. — 
C. S. S. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



87 



Pathe Review No. 17 

(Pathe— Magazine — One Reel) 
This week's releases of scenes and indus- 
tries snapped here and there by Pathe's 
cameraman are particularly entertaining. 
Perhaps the most interesting of all is "The 
Secret of Soft Coal." Under the microscope 
a piece of this bituminous fuel, which had 
been broken in the center, shows on its sur- 
face the outline of fern leaves. "Photo- 
graphic Gems" and "When Winter Comes" 
show picturesque scenes in Bear Creek Can- 
yon, Colorado, and at Cinta, Portugal, re- 
spectively. "How the American Flag Is 
Made at Philadelphia" shows the way in 
which the ensign is carefully stitched to- 
gether under government supervision — 
T. W. 



"Sporting Speed" 

(Pathe— Sportlight— One Reel) 

Grantland Rice in this issue of Sportlights 
deals with the factor of speed in sport. Be- 
ginning with showing that speed is a vital 
element in self-defense in the animal world, 
he shows how it figures in running races, 
swimming and other sports, and finally how 
it has been developed during modern times 
into the spirited contests between fast motor 
boats. There is considerable snap to this 
reel and it should be welcomed by anyone 
interested in sports. — C. S. S. 



"Lost Chords" 

(Educational — Song Series — One Reel) 

An old Alsatian melody with which the 
majority of patrons of today are not familiar 
opens this reel. This is followed by Carrie 
Jacobs-Bond's beautiful "The End of a Per- 
fect Day" and then by "Grandfather's 
Clock." As usual, each of these songs is 
pictured. Patriotism is the keynote of the 
first. The manner in which the second song 
has been handled, while it will amuse some 
patrons will possibly strike a discordant note 
with others as part of the action is in a 
facetious vein. There is also a facetious note 
in the handling of the third song. — C. S- S. 



"Slippery Decks" 

(Fox — Entertainment — One Reel) 

Anyone who likes card games and par- 
ticularly those who may have a suspicion 
that they have been cheated, will be in- 
tensely interested and entertained by this 
reel which shows in detail the tricks of card 
sharps and how they fleece the unwary by 
stacking the cards, dealing off the bottom 
and in practically giving any of the players 
just the cards they want them to have. It 
is a reel that should prove a good attrac- 
tion in almost any house. — C. S. S. 



"The Fun Shop" 

(Educational — Novelty — One Reel) 

The second issue of "The Fun Shop" lives 
up to the promise of the first, with a num- 
ber of clever and humorous sayings con- 
tributed largely by prominent people. There 
is quite a lot of subtle humor that will ap- 
peal strongly with the highest class of 
patrons. The reel ends with a Max Fleischer 
cartoon giving a modern version of "Mary 
and her lamb" which is amusing. This pic- 
tures a "Johnnie" who chases a stage beauty 
and discovers he is the "goat" when he finds 
Mary has a husband and several children. 
— C. S. S. 




contains views of its weird natural forma- 
tions. There is a section showing everyday 
life of the people of China and a section in 
Pathecolor showing various types of Alsa- 
tians with their quaint costumes.— C. S. S. 



"Publicity Pays" 

(Pathe— Comedy— One Reel) 

The aspirations of a stage-struck wife fur- 
nishes the idea of this single reel comedy in 
the Charles Chase series. She is taken in 
tow by a manager who believes in publicity, 
buys her a monkey that creates havoc in 
the hotel and keep Charles on the jump. 
When the manager threatens to buy a baby 
elephant for her, the much-abused husband 
balks. There are a number of amusing sit- 
uations and some thrills where the hero 
climbs out on a flag-pole and falls, but 
catches a rope and saves himself. It should 
prove satisfactory for the average patron. — 
C. S. S. 





Scenes from "There He Goes," an Edu- 
cational Mermaid Comedy, with Lige 
Conley, Otto Fries and Lillian Hackett. 

"A Lofty Marriage" 

(Universal — Comedy — Two Reels) 

Rivalry between the giant, Jack Earle, and 
Harry McCoy for the hand of the girl, Bar- 
tine Burkett, furnishes the basis for the ac- 
tion in this Century Comedy, distributed by 
Universal. Each seeks in Various ways to 
get the best of the other fellow. Finally a 
situation arises in which Jack gets the ad- 
vantage and is about to wed Bartine. This 
occurs while they are suspended over the 
edge of a high cliff and there are a number 
of familiar and thrilling stunts, ending with 
the falling of the two boys, who disappear, 
leaving only holes in the ground. While the 
material is of the kind that has been used 
before and will be familiar to many patrons, 
it is amusing and should afford good enter- 
tainment for Century Comedy fans. — C. S. S. 



"Pathe Review No. 18" 

(Pathe— Magazine— One Reel) 

This issue of Pathe Review contains the 
usual quota of interesting items. One sec- 
tion shows how the hair of wild horses is 
cleaned and curled and made into mattresses 
and cushions in a modern factory, another 
picture the discovery of the Cave of the 
Winds in Colorado by two "boy pirates" and 



"Powder Marks" 

(Educational — Comedy — One Reel) 

A gun club with a membership composed 
entirely of women, furnishes the locale for 
this Cameo comedy. Sid Smith is an expert 
hired to teach them to shoot and Cliff Bowes 
is his assistant. There is considerable comedy 
in the attempts of this pair to demonstrate 
their own skill and to teach the ladies. This 
is followed by scenes in the club house where 
a bear invades the place and causes con- 
fusion. It is complicated when Cliff also 
poses as a bear by using a bear rug. These 
sequences are of a familiar sort but they 
are amusing and the comedy should satisfy 
the average patron. — C. S. S. 



"When a Girl Loves" 

(Continued from page 85) 

Cast 

Sasha Boroff Agnes Ayres 

Count Michael Percy Marmont 

Dr. Godfrey Luke Robert McKtm 

Helen Knthlyn Williams 

The Czarina Mary Alden 

Rogojin George Siegmann 

Grishka John George 

I •.mi a Ynci Seabury 

Alexis William Orlamond 

Ferdovn Rosa It own nova 

Yussoff Leo White 

peter Otto Lederer 

Directed by Victor Hugo Halperin. 
Footage, 5,876 feet. 

Story 

The wealthy family of Alex Boroff Is re- 
duced to poverty by the Russian Revolution. 
Sasha Is In love with Count Michael, but 
Rogojin, a coachman, who becomes a power 
under the new regime, tries to force Sasha 
to marry him. He orders Michael shot, but 
Michael escapes. The night before the wed- 
ding Rogojin is mysteriously killed. The 
Boroff family come to America and Sasha 
takes training to become a nurse and finally, 
to pleasa her family, consents to marry Dr. 
Godfrey Luke, a rich physician. At a con- 
cert Sasha hears a famous singer and rec- 
ognizes Michael but learns he was told she 
was dead and has married. Dr. Luke and 
Michael's wife become Infatuated, and when 
a roadhouse Is raided she seeks shelter in 
his house. Michael comes for hie wife and 
he and Dr. Luke decide to fight a duel. Sasha 
comes down the stairs, receives the bullet In 
her arm, and Michael falls senseless from the 
shock of finding: she Is alive. Dr. Luke prom- 
ises to perform an operation on Michael to 
save his life if Sasha will promise to still 
live with Dr. Luke. She promises, but 
Grlsha, a dwarf who has Invented a radio 
cure, comes and brings Michael back to life. 



88 



MOVING PICTURE W ORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Large 
or small 




WARD LEONARD VITROHM DIMMER slow-motion, cross 
control, interlocking type. Built for continuous duty 



A small bank of Ward Leonard VITROHM Dim- 
mers equipped with individual and master levers. 



—there is a Vitrohm Dimmer equipment 

for every theatre 




Positive Chain Drive 

An important practical fea- 
ture of WARD LEONARD 
Theatre Dimmers is the 
positive chain drive of the 
contactor arm. No gears or 
pinions to loosen or jam. 
No lubrication annoyance. 
Simple to operate; assures 
perfect control; easy to ad- 
ust without tools. 



THfe largest dimmer installation in 
the United States, handling a load 
of 900 kw., is a Ward Leonard 
Vitrohm Dimmer. Scores of other 
Vitrohm Dimmer installations run into 
hundreds of kilowatts each. Theatres 
operating these installations are famous 
throughout the country for the lavish- 
ness and beauty of their lighting. 

Of special importance to shows on the 
road is the compact character of Ward 
Leonard Dimmer equipments. No 
other dimmers designed for a given 
service are as light, or require as little 
space, as Ward Leonard Dimmers for 
the same service. Many of the best 
known spectacular shows have used 
Ward Leonard portable dimmer out- 
fits especially designed for the road. 

VITROH M construction — an exclusive 
Ward Leonard feature — seals the re- 
sistance wire in glass-hard, tough, fire- 



proof enamel, impervious to air or 
moisture— permanently protects the re- 
sistance element against deterioration 
by oxidation or corrosion. The special 
Ward Leonard contact-arm drive 
insures positive operation with a 
minimum of effort. Any unit may be 
individually operated, or any desired 
number operated simultaneously — all 
lamps being brightened or dimmed at 
once, or one group increased in brilliancy 
while another group is decreased. 

Remember that there is a Ward 
Leonard Dimmer equipment for every 
theatre, large or small — for every stage 
or auditorium lighting requirement — 
for every lighting effect in any show 
either in New York or on the road. 
And, large or small, the service of every 
Ward Leonard Vitrohm Dimmer in 
sures perfect lighting control, maxi- 
mum safety and the utmost economy 
in operation and maintenance. 



Ward Leonard/Tectric Gompany 

I Mount: ! / 



37-41 South Street 

Atlanta— G. P. Atkinson New Orleans — Electron Eng Co , Inc 
Baltimore-J. E. Perkins Philadelphia- W. Miller Tompkins 
Boston— W. W. Gaskill Detroit— C E. Wise 
San Francisco— Elec. Material Co. 

6720-17 



'Mount 
V§rnon, 
XewybrK 



37-41 South Street 

St. Louis— G. W. Pieksen 
Cleveland— W. P. Ambos Co. 
Dallas- W A.Gibson 



Chicago— Westburg Eng. Co. 
Pittsburgh— W. A. Bittner Co. 
Montreal- Willis D. Bishop 
London, Eng.— W. Geipel & Co. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



89 




Equipment Construction Maintenance 



. Mill-; ■ il i„ V ,ii 



Oil Heating for the Theatre 



IT is virtually impossible to discuss the 
proposition of oil heating for the pic- 
ture theatre without becoming somewhat 
technical. However, no technical knowledge 
is needed to understand the fact that oil 
heating is thoroughly practical. 

It is a well-established combustion prin- 
ciple that, to secure efficiency from oil used 
as fuel, the oil must be thoroughly broken 
or atomized. To accomplish this result, one 
of two processes must be used; the oil may 
be atomized or broken either by steam or 
air pressure. In the case of the low grades 
of oil used for power or commercial heating 
purposes, steam is used as the atomizing 
agent for a double purpose; first, to break 
the oil and, second, to pre-heat in order 
to make combustion of low-grade oil pos- 
sible. 

Some Technical Points 

Fuel oil is from twenty-eight to thirty- 
one specific gravity, and furnace, or un- 
bleached kerosene, is from thirty-eight to 
forty-one specific gravity, the latter being 



the most inflammable. The flash point of 
fuel oil is 180 degrees Fahrenheit. These 
technical points are brought out in order 
that the reader may realize the differences 
in oils as affecting hazard. 

The Marvel Burner 

The Marvel Fuel Oil Burner, as its name 
implies, uses fuel oil for heating purposes 
and not furnace oil or unbleached kerosene, 
as is in common use in most heating devices. 

Fuel oil may be stored in a basement with- 
out affecting insurance rules. Fire depart- 
ment regulations, of course, vary in different 
communities. In Chicago, for instance, stor- 
age is permitted, in a basement, of 1,500 
gallons of fuel oil without question. New 
York City regulations on the contrary, are 
so drastic as to practically preclude the pos- 
sibility of the use of oil fuel or furnace oil 
for heating purposes. The regulations for 
storage in New York City would compel a 
consumer to surround a tank with walls of 
concrete at least ten inches in thickness. 
(Continued on page 92) 




FIRST PHOTO OF A THEATRE COSMETIC ROOM 
One of two in Saxe's New Wisconsin Theatre, Milwaukee. 




3 



PK.OJ ECTION 

EDITED BY F. H. RICHARDSON 



Congratu la tions 

Long ago I knew "Our Mary" personally 
— and of course liked that charming lady, as 
we all did and do. The other night, through 
the courtesy of the management, friend 
daughter and I viewed a picture, "Thief of 
Bagdad," which I understand was planned 
by her husband, Doug Fairbanks, and 
filmed under his supervision. If that is true 
I don't blame Mary for making a team of 
Pickford and Fairbanks, for the man who 
could plan such a production as we saw last 
night— well, I'm for him. Gosh! I thought 
I knew this game fairly well, but some of 
the things pulled off in "Thief of Bagdad" 
had us all exuding exclamations and guess- 
ing. It's great ! 

The projection was by Les Reed and Ben 
Morton, and when we consider the heavy 
projection angle the results were excellent 
indeed. Except for one or two titles which 
jumped a bit, the screen image was steady 
as the proverbial rock— proof of the almost 
marvelous accuracy of the present film per- 
forations and of the projection mechanisms 
of today — Simplex in this case — Type C. 

It is not my province to comment on or 
to review productions. That is a function 
of another section of the World, BUT "The 
Thief of Bagdad" is such an entirely extra- 
ordinary thing that I trust the reviewer will 
not feel peeved at me in this instance, es- 
pecially because I am sure he will agree 
with all I've said. 

Congratulations, friend Fairbanks. Tell 
your friend wife hello for me and accept my 
sincere congratulations on your remarkable 
production. 



Bluebook School 



Each week, taking them in rotation, I 
am publishing five of the 842 questions 
from the list at the back of the Blue- 
book. In the book itself the number of 
the page or pages where the answer will 
be found is indicated. Five weeks after 
asking the questions, that answer which 
seems to be best will be published, together 
with the names of those sending satis- 
factory answers. Beginning ninety days 
after publication the best reply by a 
projectionist, other than Canadian and 
United States, will be published, together 
with names of projectionists of those 
countries who send good answers. 
WARNING: Don't merely copy your 
answer from Bluebook. Put the matter 
in your own words. I want to know 
whether or not you really understand 
what you have read in the Bluebook. 

This whole plan is calculated to get 
men to really study the Bluebook they 
have bought, and thus get real worth 
out of it. 

Question No. 35: Of what elements 
does the projection lens consist? 

Question No. 36: What is meant by 
the "front factor" and "back factor" of 
a projection lens? 

Question No. 37: Which lenses of a 
projection lens are cemented together 
and with what are they cemented ? 

Question No. 33: What is the optical 
effect of cementing the lenses of the 
front factor together? 

Question No. 39: Are the lenses of 
the back factor always separated by a 
spacious ring? 



Oh Boy! 

I've just finished reading articles received 
from Chauncey L. Greene, Minneapolis, 
which held me to the last word of sixteen 
pages of Mss. In all my experience as edi- 
tor of this department, covering more than 
thirteen years, I have not received as con- 
sistently well written, well reasoned and 
thoroughly capable a series of articles. 
Friend Greene is, as I understand the mat- 
ter, a student in the College of Engineering 
of the University of Minnesota. If this is 
true I do hope that when he has finished 
and goes out into the world he may find the 
projection of pictures to be sufficiently fas- 
cinating, and otherwise available to cause 
him to take it up as a life work. 

The sixteen pages I spoke of contain many 
separate articles. He starts off by saying: 
Working Distance Tables 

I notice in a recent issue of the World 
that you are at loss to And the tables of 
working- distances which the lens companies 
computed for you. so I am copying them 
from my note book and sending them to 
you. Also (and this Is a dirty trick) I am 
sending in the stuff I mentioned I was "ed- 
iting" when I ordered the lens charts. How- 
ever, I find It cannot be edited into one 
coherent article, so I am merely going to 
take the items, one by one, from my notes 
and set them down in the hope that you 
may be able to cull from the lot one or two 
at least that may be of use, and so In part 
repay you for wading through the lot (if you 
do). 1 am forced to the conclusion that the 
only fitting title for the hodge podge Is 
"Scrambled Eggs — many are culled and few 
are chosen." 

That last is true, but not as applies to 
your writings, friend Greene. I propose to 
use it all, or very nearly so, though it will 
be split up into several separate articles. 
Your own Mss. will be used, without altera- 
tion, in all cases, which is in itself very 
unusual. 

Here is friend Greene's ideas as to what 
projection must be in order to intrigue men 



The First of the Bluebook School Answers 



Well, gentlemen, here they are at last. 
Question No. 1 was best answered by 
A. L. Fell, Collingswood, N. J., but 
Harry T. Dobson, Toronto, Ont.; W. D. 
Shank, Toronto; W. E. Lewis, Endicott, 
N. Y., and Daniel Constantino, Easton, 
Pa., all sent very good replies. Friend 
Fell's answer reads: 

Question No. 1. Quote law relating to 
light intensity at different distances from 
an open light source and explain its op- 
eration. 

Answer: "Light intensity decreases 
inversely as the square of the distance 
from its source." This applies to light 
from an open light source only, and not 
after the light rays have been acted 
upon by a lens. Light rays emanating 
from an open light source travel in 
straight, diverging lines, therefore the 
more distant an object of given area be 
from the source of light, the less num- 
ber of rays it will receive, hence the 
less brilliant will be its illumination. The 
decrease in illumination will be inversely 
as the square of the distance. 

Question No. 2 also was best replied 
to by A. L. Fell, Collingswood, N. J., 



but Harry Dobson, Toronto; W. D. 
Shank, Toronto; Daniel Constantino, 
Easton, Pa., and Walter E. Lewis, Endi- 
cott, N. Y., all did very well. 

Question: What is meant by "Ab- 
sorption of light?" 

Answer by Fell: As applies to lenses, 
when light passes through glass a por- 
tion of its energy is absorbed by the 
medium. This portion is ordinarily 
transformed into heat, though in some 
cases the energy is partially absorbed in 
working chemical changes. The absorp- 
tion of good glass is about one per cent, 
per inch of distance traversed by the 
light. 

(Note : Those who included substances 
other than glass in their replies were 
correct, but friend Fell worded his an- 
swer best, and except for the screen, 
absorption, as applies to projection, is 
mostly in the lenses. — Ed.) 

Question No. 3: What is meant by 
an "Actinic Ray?" This was best an- 
swered by Harry T. Dobson, Toronto. 
A. L. Fell, W. D. Shank, J. L. Fraiser, 
Atlantic City, Daniel Constantino and 
W. E. Lewis all made good replies. 



Dobson said: "All light rays, natural 
or artificial, which cause chemical 
changes in the thing they strike are 
'actinic rays.' Violet and ultra violet 
are the best known of these rays. It is 
the actinic rays which make photog- 
raphy possible." 

Questions 4 and 5. What is meant by 
the angle of incidence and the angle of 
reflection? I have combined these two 
questions because they all did that in 
their replies. 

Robert Dunwoody, New Orleans, La., 
made the best answer, though Harry 
Dobson and Shank, both of Toronto, did 
fairly well. Dunwoody says: 

"The angle of incidence is the angle 
a ray of light makes with a line drawn 
perpendicular to the surface upon which 
the ray is incident. 'Perpendicular to' 
means a line at right angles to the spot 
of the surface where the ray is incident, 
or where it strikes. 'Angle of reflection' 
is an angle exactly equal to the angle of 
incidence. It is the angle the reflected 
ray makes with a line perpendicular with 
the surface of the medium at the point 
the incideit ray strikes." 

And thus endeth the first lesson. 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



91 



of real brains and ability. Read it, my 
brother; and say whether or not YOU would 
brother, and say whether or no YOU would 
welcome into ANY field of the motion pic- 
ture industry a man who writes as Greene 
does. I feel unable to answer the questions 
he propounds — not when he asks them that 
way. I would NOT be made to feel respon- 
sible for the crystalization of plans for the 
future of a man of such apparent ability, 
but I certainly would welcome him into the 
field of projection with both hands. Here is 
an article which OUGHT to bring comment 
from every man of ability and brains in the 
profession of projection — from every man 
who admires ability and takes real pride in 
the profession he has chosen for his life 
work. What have YOU to say to friend 
Greene? Here is what he says to YOU: 

In commenting on my answer to Mr. Dun- 
lop's question regarding- intermittent move- 
ment speed and shutter master-blade width, 
you (after prodigious, but I sincerely hope 
unsuccessful efforts to cause my hatband to 
fit too snugly) inquired, "Is this an indica- 
tion that men of engineering training are 
being attracted to the field of projection?" 
I can only make this answer: Any field, to 
be attractive to the truly professional man, 
must hold forth four inducements. 

The Inducements 

1. The subject itself must hold for him 
an Intense interest amounting to fascina- 
tion. He must be able to love the work 
for the work's sake; 

2. It must offer reasonable remunera- 
tion, sufficient to permit him to move in 
professional circles without embarrass- 
ment, and to- insure the future comfort of 
those dependent upon him. 

3. The field must be capable of limitless 
expansion and deepening. Each problem 
solved must point the way to other prob- 
lems of still greater intricacy and still 
greater promise. 

4. There must be opportunity for real 
service. At the close of each year he must 
be able to look back through the previous 
twelve months over achievements which 
will swell the conviction within him that 
"as the swift seasons roll" he will approach 
the end of life with a calm assurance born 
of the knowledge that countless thousands 
of people are happier and better because 
of the application which he has made of 
his knowledge, his training and his God- 
given talents. 

At Rest on Three Points 
For my part, my mind is at rest on the 
first three points, but I am not so sure about 
the fourth as applied to the motion picture 
industry. I am very unwilling to believe 
that I, for instance, could rise to any re- 
sponsible position in so great an industry 
and not render real service; and yet when I 
compare it with the service rendered by the 
man who brings whole rivers down from a 
mountain range to a sun-baked desert and 
adds millions of acres to the productive area 
of the earth, or with that rendered by the 
man who harnesses almost inaccessible wat- 
erfalls and transmits their energy in the 
form of man-made lightmng to take the 
place of power otherwise derived from irre- 
placeable coal, I am not so sure. Is it not 
likely that your views on this phase of the 
question in the light of your years of ex- 
perience would be greatly appreciated by a 
large number of department readers? 

What Would You Dof 
Assuming that the motion picture indust- 
try fulfills all four requirements, and that 
you were in my circumstances, about to 
graduate from the U. of M. after five years 
of technical training in the Electrical Engi- 
neering Department and nine years of prac- 
tical projection exper.ence, and wanted to 
follow up projection from the engineering 
standpoint, just what would you do.' If this 
is something which you cannot conveniently 
answer through the department, or for any 
reason would rather answer directly I would 
be more than glad to pay the usual rate. This 
is a very vital question to me just now. be- 
cause within the year I must decide whether 
I am going to leave the field of projection for 
good and all, or whether I will continue in it 
with the intention and the determination to 
become, eventually, a recognized world au- 
thority. No lesser aim would be worthy, no 
lesser realization would ever satisfy me. 

I will just add this comment. While it is 
quite true that men who harness and make 
available the forces of nature are doing for 
humanity a work of almost incalculable value, 
still that one who expends his talents and 
energy in providing good, wholesome, clean 
amusement for many people each day, is 
performing just as essential a service, be- 
cause after all,, while life without labor is 
not an enjoyable existence for the worth- 
while man or woman, that labor must be fol- 



lowed by relaxation and amusement— play in 
various forms, else life becomes a mere drab 
existence of work-eat-sleep, sleep-eat-work, 
eat-work-sleep, world without end, and thus 
is the "Brother to the Ox" created. 

So we who help supply the amusement — 
who help the worker to play and thus put 
him in condition to more effectively harness 
the powers of nature, may feel our employ- 
ment to be just as important and just as 
commendable and honorable as any other 
line of human endeavor, bar none. 



From Toronto 

Our old friend, Harry T. Dobson, projec- 
tionist Palace Theatre, Toronto, sends in 
answer to first set of Bluebook questions, 
with following remarks on separate sheet 
of paper: 

Dear Friend Richardson: Here are answers 
to the first five questions. Seems like old 
times, doesn't It? A few years ago you did 
the same thing, only then we had no "Blue- 
book' to find the answers in. Are you going 
to publish an "Honor Roll' as you did then? 
That also was a good idea. 

Tried out Griffith's pinhole-in-back-of- 
lamphouse stunt, but was not successful. I 
got three or four images of crater floor, but 
none of them sharp. You surely can see the 
carbons burning, and in natural colors, too; 
however, if you hold a condenser against the 
pinhole and get a sharp image on a sheet of 
paper held a few inches away from the lens, 
it is the rear of the carbons you see, though 
— not the face. 

A Tip 

Here is a thing I tried out and found suc- 
cessful with a Simplex projector and a Fulco 
or Peerless arc control — or, so far as that 
goes, with any arc control. Changed the rod 
or handle which feeds the carbons together 
from its regular postion inside of rear of 
lamphouse, B in drawing, and located to po- 




sition A, in center of sliding panel in center 
of back of Simplex large lamphouse. This 
gives a more direct action and eliminates all 
tendency to bind; also is lessens the collec- 
tion of handles on the working side by one, 
which is not in itself at all objectionable. 

In closing let me express my sincere good 
wishes for the success of the Bluebook. 

Thanks, Brother Dobson. Its success was 



GET IT NOW! 

The Brand New 

Lens Chart 

By 

JOHN GRIFFITHS 

Here is an accurate chart which belongs 
in every projection room where carbon 
arcs are used. It will enable you to get 
maximum screen results with the equip- 
ment you are using. 

The news Lens Chart (size IS" x 20") 
is printed on heavy Ledger Stock paper, 
suitable for framing. 

Price $1.00 

Chalmers Publishing Co. 

516 Fifth Avenue New York City 



assured almost from the start. Considering 
the necessarily rather high price, the book 
has had and is having a phenomenal sale. 
This is gratifying to me, because I find that 
the real honest-to-God value I tried so hard 
to put into the book succeeded against very 
ROTTEN tactics pursued by some, who de- 
pend upon such tactics instead of real worth 
incorporated in what they have for sale. 

As to your two-or-three-images— well, I'll 
leave friend Griffith to explain matters and 
tell you why it didn't work and why you got 
all those images. Personally, I dunno. 

As to Feed Control 

As to the Simplex carbon feed control, 
and changing its position: I think the handle 
was placed where it is with intent to put it 
in convenient position for hand feed— also 
to leave the sliding panel free. Where an 
arc control is used and the sliding panel is 
not, I would say there ought to be an ad- 
vantage in making the change. 

As to the honor roll — well, what do you 
who have taken up the matter of replying 
to the questions, or who contemplate doing 
so, think about the matter? Also exactly 
what was the "honor roll" composed of? 
I don't remember. It was long ago. Can 
look it up, of course, but presumably 
Brother Dobson remembers all about it. 

P. S. By the way, what I think I'll do is 
to publish all the names of those answering 
each question in a satisfactory way at the 
same time the best answer is published— 
which will be about four or five weeks after 
the publication of the question itself, thus 
giving ample time for all our readers in 
the United States and Canada to reply who 
may wish to. NOTE: I will also, about 
ninety days after publication of the first 
list of questions, begin publication of the 
best answer received from any country 
other than the U. S. and Canada, together 
with name and location of all those who 
send satisfactory replies. Now let's see what 
country has men best trained in the techni- 
cal end of projection. Go to it ! 



Atta Boy! 

H. E. Schlichter, Projectionist, the Ligget 
Theatre, Madison, Kansas, sticks his oar 
carefully into the writatorial waters thusly : 

After reading your article, "Waking Up" 
March 22 issue, I am tempted to let you 
know that, even though I am out here in 
"The Sticks," I am interested in the more 
extended use of the term Projectionist. 
Moreover, I am glad to sav I am working 
for a manager who is of like opinion. He 
regards high grade projection as first among 
the requisites for success at the box office. 

Uses Simplex 

I have two 1923 Simplex projectors and 
use Mazda with a 105-foot projection dis- 
tance. Am getting a fine picture on a Gard- 
ner screen. A direct current arc was tried 
out first, but Mazda was used in preference. 

I have an up-to-date projection room. It 
is 14x9x11 feet (Not very clear when we 
don't know which dimension the 14 stands 
for. Presumably the 9 is ceilino- height. — 
Ed.), with automatic port fire shutters, an 
automatic revinder and a film inspection 
and repair room. 

Am very much interested in your depart- 
ment in the World (Wrong! It is NOT "my" 
department, but "OUR" department, friend 
Schlichter. — Ed.) and sometimes when I run 
into a brain twister which I am unable to 
solve — (not an infrequent occurrence) you 
may hear from me. 

We have as fine a little 600-seat theatre 
as you will find in this section of unexplored 
Kansas. If ever you happen to be in this 
part of the woods we would feel honored by 
a visit. 

Good for your manager. Shake hands 
with him for me. Most managers, I am 
sorry to say, seem to think projection a 
mere more or less necessary damned 
nuisance, and they treat it accordingly. I 
will be glad to hear from you and to help 
you in any way I can at any time. 

It is no disgrace to be out there "in the 
sticks." Sometimes I wish I were, myself. 
If we all left "the sticks" — well, I guess we 
city chaps would soon be taking some sev- 
eral reefs in friend belt I 



92 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Oil Heating 



(Continued from page 89) 
Economy in Oil 

That there is a positive economy in the 
substitution of fuel oil for coal there can 
be no question, although the exact figure 
of economy, in individual instances, cannot 
be determined without exhaustive tests. 

Primarily, economy in fuel oil burning is 
due to intermittent operation, whereas the 
consumption of coal is continuous even 
though a fire may be banked. There is an 
instantaneous one hundred per cent, heat 
upon ignition of fuel oil. In other words, 
furnace temperatures are at their maximum 
during the period of combustion, whereas 
coal starts at a minimum, moves to a maxi- 
mum, and again falls to a minumum before 
replenishment. 

Even Temperature Maintained 

The maintenance of an even temperature 
is entirely automatic with the Marvel Fuel 
Oil Burner. There is first a wall thermostat 
which can be set at a desired temperature 
and the machine will start or stop with a 
two degree fall or increase in temperature. 

A boiler thermostat provides an additional 
element of control or safety should the wall 
thermostat be accidently broken or dam- 
aged. The boiler thermostat is set for water 
temperature or steam pressure, as the case 
may be. Should the temperature of the 
water exceed a point equal to that tem- 
perature which is desired to be maintained 
in a room or theatre, the current will be 
automatically broken and the machine 
stopped. When the temperature of the boil- 
er falls, the machine will automatically start 
and continue in operation until the desired 



temperature is reached. Another control 
prevents the machine from running, and 
thereby pumping fuel oil into the boiler, 
should oil fail to ignite for an unknown rea- 
son. 

Safety and Stability 

In designing the Marvel machine, the first 
consideration was that of safety and stabil- 




Marvel Fuel Oil Burner Attached to Coal 
Furnace. 

ity. It is an assemblage of sturdy machinery, 
mounted on a bed plate, twenty-two inches 
long by twenty inches wide. A one-half 
horse-power noiseless motor is provided for 
one-quarter horse-power duty although no 
more current is consumed. An additional 
power is provided to overcome resistance, 
due possibly to lack of proper lubrication, 



in which event the armature of the one- 
quarter horse-power motor would probably 
burn out and the machine be put out of 
commission. 

A specially designed oil pump carries fuel 
oil to the nozzle of the burner, which is 
installed in the coal door. The air pump 
provides a three pound pressure of air which 
it also carries to the burner and provides 
a wall of air through which the oil must 
pass and be thoroughly atomized before 
being ignited. The air pump on this installa- 
tion will produce within one-half inch of 
perfect vacuum. Obviously a pump of this 
character is not necessary to produce a three 
pound pressure of air, and a less expensive 
pump might be used, provided its reliability 
could be absolutely depended upon. 

The installation of a Marvel Fuel Oil 
Burner does not necessitate the removal of 
grate bars, which, in the event of the cessa- 
tion of electric current or gas, w : ould re- 
lieve an embarrassing situation in extremely 
cold weather. The loosening of two screws 
and one union enables the coal door to be 
opened and the lifting of one or two fire 
bricks from a baffle which covers the grate 
bars, will permit coal or wood or any avail- 
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a measure of safety which cannot be over- 
looked in the consideration of the desirability 
of oil burning. 

The designers of the Marvel Fuel Oil 
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machine which is economical, reliable and 
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low temperature to be maintained during 
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MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



93 



Movie Music Chats 



By M. J. MINTZ. 



(Editor's Note— This is the first of a 
series of articles on music in the theatre. 
The second will appear in an early issue.) 

PRODUCERS and distributors of feature 
pictures have finally awakened to the 
realization of the vital importance of appro- 
priate music to the picture. So as not to be 
misunderstood, let me say right here that 
by appropriate music I do not mean any spe- 
cified number of men in an orchestra. What 
I mean is fitting musical accompaniment for 
each action in a picture, whether the thea- 
tre boasts of a symphony orchestra of mere- 
ly a single pianist or organist. 

At the beginning of the film industry, 
music as a part of picture entertainment was 
given no serious thought, for the reason that 
at that time even the makers of the pic- 
tures had not the faintest idea to what pro- 
portions the industry would develop. Some 
time later, feature film productions began to 
make their appearance, and with them came 
press and publicity sheets or books, the pur- 
pose of the latter being to instruct the ex- 
hibitor how to advertise the picture so as 
to draw the crowds. 

Meaningless Music 

Nothing, however, was said or suggested 
regarding music, with the result that in the 
majority of movie theatres, whether the 
music was furnished by an orchestra or a 
pianist or organist, the selections rendered 
during the screening of the film were posi- 
tively meaningless as far as the story of the 
picture was concerned. In innumerable in- 



stances the numbers played made the picture, 
possibly a very good feature, seem ridiculous 
and meaningless, and not only added nothing 
to the worth of the film, but absolutely de- 
tracted from its merit and spoiled it, thus 
mitigating against the success of the picture. 

Just imagine this situation. A scene in a 
picture (an old one of course) has the play- 
ers dancing — a polka, a minuet — some old 
fashioned dance. And the music accompany- 
ing it is some nice pleasant waltz tune, en- 
tirely out of time with the dancers. Or 
again, a scene showing soldiers of some for- 
eign nation marching proudly down the 
street, accompanied by the stirring strains of 
a John Philip Sousa march, which they 
themselves probably never heard. And these 
are actual instances, from the knowledge of 
the writer, who was himself a theatre man- 
ager back in "the good old days." 

First Step Forward 

Of course this situation could not continue 
long. The motion picture companies soon 
realized the harm this was doing to their 
pictures and the next step forward was the 
preparation of a list of musical suggestions 
for each picture, published in their press 
books, which idea was, I believe, originated 
by the Paramount Company and very soon 
adopted by the others. This was a big step 
in the right direction and immediately made 
an improvement in the presentation and in- 
cidentally the reception of the pictures. The 
musicians were then at least enabled to get 
(Continued on page 94) 




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MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Music Chats 

(Continued from page 93) 

an idea of what to expect on the screen; 
they knew that if an Italian scene was 
shown, the atmosphere should be Italian, 
etc. 

But even this step left room for many a 
peculiar and amusing situation. One of the 
funniest that came under the observation of 
the writer was a scene in a picture where a 
man left on a business trip for a period of 
two weeks. The title distinctly read "I will 
be back in two weeks." The music sug- 
gested, as the man said good-bye was one 
of the "Good-Bye" numbers, an appropriate 
selection. However, it so happened that this 
particular leader did not have this "Good- 
Bye" number, so he simply substituted Tosti's 
"Good-Bye" which he had in his library. 
The words of this latter number, if you re- 
call, are "Good-bye forever, etc." And the 
musicians couldn't understand the shout of 
laughter which went up from the audience 
when they began playing their number. They 
probably had not even seen the title referred 
to, being intent on playing their music as 
laid out. Many other ridiculous situations 
of the same general type marred many a 
performance. 

Difficulty in Substitution 

The difficulty, of course, was in the matter 
of substitution. The leader would get his 
cue sheet possibly a day or two before the 
picture was to be played, possibly even the 
same day. There might be thirty or forty 
numbers suggested, of which he would have 
only half or less in his library. He would 
have to substitute other numbers for the 
ones he did not have, either because the 
time was too short to get the numbers sug- 
gested or he did not feel that he could afford 
to add to his library at that time. The num- 
bers suggested, however, showed only the 
titles and composers of the selections. In 
many cases the leader did not even know the 
composition. With so many new numbers 
being published almost daily, you can readily 
appreciate that it is practically impossible 
for the orchestra leader to know all of 
them. In that case he simply had to rely 
on what information the title of the com- 
position gave him. And sometimes they 
gave him no information whatever. For 
instance, the selection "Natoma," by Herbert, 
was suggested. The leader did not know 
the number. He asked one of his men if he 
knew it. The answer was that he knew it 
was a very good number but didn't know 
just how it went. On this meager informa- 
tion, the leader had to substitute another 
selection. And the result, nine times out of 
ten, was even more ridiculous than the 
"Good-bye" instance cited above. 

Depended on Memory 

Even worse was the plight of the indi- 
vidual pianist or organist who played the pic- 
ture alone. In many instances they de- 
pended almost entirely on their memories, 
and it must be said that their memories 
were generally good. However, you can 
realize the difficulty they had when a short 
flash on the screen called for a certain num- 
ber. By the time they thought of the tune 
of the selection, the occasion for it was gone. 
And often they really knew a selection, but 
just couldn't remember the strain. How 
often have you asked someone to play a 
certain number for you? They would ask 
"How does it go?" All you had to do was 
hum a few bars and they could play right 
through the entire number. They immedi- 



ately recalled it. And without the first 
few strains they were lost. 

An Elaboration 

Out of this idea was the final development 
of the musical cue sheet born. The writer, 
himself a musician and a former theatre 
manager and owner, having come in con- 
tact with this problem from all its angles, 
conceived the idea of doing exactly what 
you would do for your friend. He felt that 
the same thing could be done for the musi- 
cian. Suggest to him the strain or mood of 
the selected number. Tell him how it went. 
Help him to substitute another appropriate 
number if he did not have the selected num- 
ber by giving him an idea of what the sug- 
gested number was like. Give him the 
"Thematic Music Cue Sheet." 

ft was an elaboration of the old cue 



sheet, and an improvement so wonderful that 
it made the musical presentation "fool-proof." 
It really "made" the musical presentation. 
And it was all so simple that the wonder 
of it is that the writer ever thought of it. 
You know it is the simple, everyday things 
that we often overlook. The idea was to 
reprint below the title of the suggested num- 
ber a few bars of that very number, enough 
to give the musician the real idea of what 
the compiler intended as the mood of the 
musical accompaniment for that particular 
scene. Simple, isn't it? — and yet how diffi- 
cult before that result was accomplished. 

With the "Thematic Music Cue Sheet" the 
musician has no worries about his musical 
presentation. He can get the cue sheet the 
same day as the picture and still be able 
(Continued on page 95) 



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MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



95 



Music Chats 

(Continued from page 94) 

to play the picture properly — because it 
enables him, without loss of time or accuracy, 
to do that necessary thing — properly sub- 
stitute for the suggested selections he may 
not have. 

The idea caught like wildfire. The pro- 
gressive motion picture producers realized 
the advantage of this improved form of 
cue sheet and today practically every mo- 
tion picture producer or distributor of any 
note issues the "Thematic Music Cue 
Sheet" to the exhibitors for the use of their 
musicians, for the mutual good of all con- 
cerned. 

Thousands of musicians and theatre own- 
ers from coast to coast have enthusiastically 
written to me, lauding the "Thematic Music 
Cue Sheet." 

And Mr. S. L. Rothafel, of the Capitol 
Theatre, New York City, one of the greatest 
showmen in the world, does not hesitate to 
say that the "Thematic Music Cue Sheet" is 
a wonderful aid for all motion picture thea- 
tres. 



Page Organ Draws Crowds 

Standing room only was to be had when 
Messrs. Scholl, Gallagher and Gleason re- 
cently dedicated the new $15,000 Page pipe 
organ in their Gem Theatre, a 350-seat house 
in Newark, Ohio. William Dalton, the well- 
known organist of the Grand Theatre, Co- 
lumbus, motored to Newark to give a spe- 
cial midnight concert on the beautiful in- 
strument, and the following day Prof. Ber- 
ton Burkett, assisted by Frank Reynolds, 
the Gem organist, officially dedicated the 
organ with a series of recitals. 

The occasion testified to the value of 
music in a picture theatre. The Gem has 
been crowded since the installation of the 
Page instrument and many compliments 
have been paid the proprietors for installing 
so expensive an organ in such a compara- 
tively small theatre. 

Experts required two weeks' time to in- 
stall it, working under the supervision of 
Don Maus, one of the country's leading pipe 
organ builders. The pipes range in height 
from sixteen feet down to the length of a 



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match, and if the wiring was in one straight 
line it would be 100 miles long. The method 
of operation provides that each touch of the 
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so that each valve is opened and closed at 
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Recent Incorporations 



Albany. — Six companies incorporated and 
entered the motion picture business in New 
York state during the past week, these com- 
panies revealing the following capitalization 
and directors : Triumphant Productions, 
$20,000, Nat Nathanan, F. J. Whittle, Morris 
Rothman, New York city; Till Amusement 
Corporation, $2,000, H. G. Kraft, L. Graff, 
M. O'Heir, New York city; Leon Gordon 
Productions, $50,000, Leon Gordon, W. H. 
Adams, D. Smith, New York city; Trial 
Honeymoon, Inc., $10,000, Isidor Cohn, Joseph 
Gaites, Lewis Newman, New York; Winship 
Press Association, $10,000, Marie and C. E. 
Elliott, Rex Large, New York city. 



Like Universal Plant 

The following letter has been received by 
the Universal Motor Co., Oshkosh, Wis, 
from the L. M. Miller Theatrical Enterprises, 
Wichita, Kans.: "In reply to your letter of 
March 26th, beg to advise that the Universal 
10 KW electric plant we have installed in 
our Miller Theatre for emergency service 
has given us absolute satisfaction. The 
truth of the matter is that we are getting a 
steadier light from this emergency plant 
than from our motor generator set which 
we are using all of the time." 



LA CINEMATOGRAFIA 
ITALIANA ED ESTERA 

Official Organ of the Italian Cinematograph Union 

Published on the 
15th and 30th of Each Month 

Forties: •vkurlptlon: $7.0* or SI truss per Aaaim 

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ALLIED PRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 

Review Footage 

Richard the Lion-Hearted Wallace Beery Nov. 3 7.298 

Loving Lies Monte Blue Feb. 2 6.526 

No More Women Matt Moore-Bellamy Feb. 2 6.186 

The Hill Billy Jack Pickford Mar. 22 5,734 

ARROW 

Days of '49 Neva Gerber serial April S 

Gambling Wives Marjirie Daw Mar. 22 6.438 

Romeo Mix-Up Edmund Cobb 

Western Yesterdays Edmund Cobb 

Western Fate Hatton-Gerber 

Whirlwind Ranger Hatton-Gerber 

Notch Number One Ben Wilson 

Models and Artists Bobby Dunn 

Oh, Billy Billy West 

ASSOCIATED EXHIBITORS 

Dmvid Copper6eld Star cast Nov. 17. 

The Miracle Makers I.eah Baird Dec. 22. 

The Yankee Consul Douglas MacLean Feb. 23. 

EDUCATIONAL FILMS CORP. 

Jean of Heceta Head "Wilderness Tales" Jan. 19. 

Haunted Hills "Wilderness Tales" Jan. 19. 

Flowers of Hate "WikterncM Tales" Jan. 19. 

A Sailor s Life "Hodge Podge" Jan. 19. 

Stay Single Christie comedy Jan. 19. 

Lest We Forget "Sing Them Again" Jan. 

Neck and Neck Mermaid comedy Jan. 

Oh, Girls/ Sid Smith Jan. 

The Butterfly Tolhurst series Jan. 

Aggravating Papa Jimmy Adams Feb. 

The Broncho Express Clyde Cook Feb. 

About Face Juvenile comedy .Feb. 

Here And There Sid Smith Feb. 

A Movie Pioneer Hodgc-Podge reb. 

Lonesome Lloyd Hamilton Feb. 

Old Friends ''Sing Them Again" Feb. 

Busy Buddies Christie comedy Feb. 

Plastigrams Stereoscopic Feb. 

Wide Open Mermaid comedy Feb. 

Jumping Jacks Hodge Podce Mar. 

Getting Gertie's Goat Dorothy Devore Mar. 

Cave Inn Sirl Smith Mar. 

The Ant Lion Secrets of Life Alar. 

Long Ago "Sing Them Again" Mar. 

The New Sheriff , Tuxedo comedy Mar. 

Under Orders Clyde Cook Mar. 

Midnight Blues Line Conley Mar. 

Family Life Jack White prod Mar. 

Bargain Day Sid Smith Mar. 

Baroum Jr Juvenile comedy Mar. 

The Fly Scientific April 

Killing Rime Lloyd Hamilton April 

Dusty Dollars Cameo comedy April 

Dandy Lions Nral Burns April 

Safe and Sane Jimmie Adams April 

There He Goes Mermaid comedy April 

Heart Throbs "Sing Them Again" April 

Realm of Sport Hodge-Podge April 

Fold Up Cameo comedy April 

Going East Lloyd Hamilton April 

The Fun Shop Humor reel April 

The Trader Keeps Moving Bruce scenic April 

The Lady-Bird Instructive April 



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FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY 

The Ten Commandments Cecil B DeMille prod Jan. 

The -humming Jird Gloria Swanson Jan. 

Heritage of the Desert Daniels- Torrence Feb. 

Flaming Barriers Logan- Moreno Feb. 

Pied Piper Malone Thomas Meighan Feb. 

The Stranger Compson-Dix Feb. 

Trie Next Corner Tearle-Oianey-Mackail ... Feb. 

Shadows of Pans Pola Negri Mar 

Icebound Dix Wilson Mar. 

A Society Scandal Gloria Swanson Mar 

The Fighting Coward lames Cruze prod Mar 

The Dawn of a Tomorrow Jacqueline Logan April 

Singer Jim McKee W. S. Hart April 

The Breaking Point Star cast April 

The Confidence Man Thomas Meighan April 

The Moral Sinner Dorothy Dalton April 

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Babes in tlic Hollywood "Fighting Bi«»k1" Ian. 12 2.000 

Beauty and the Feast "Fighting Blood" Jan. 12 2 nrm 

The Switching Hour "Fighting Blood" Jan. 12 2.000 

Phantom Justice Feature cast Tan. 26 6.230 

Alimony Featured cast Feb. . 2 6917 

Week-End Husbands Alma Rubens Feb. 9 6 70n 

White Sin Madge Rrllamy Feb. 23 6.237 

The Telephone Girl (series) Alberta Vaughn Feb. 23 

Damaged Hearts Featured cast Mar. 1 6 I" 

When Knighthood Was in Tower. .. "Telephone Girl" Mar. 8 2 000 

North of Nevada Fred Thompson Mar. 15 5,000 



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Sherlocks Home "Telephone Girl" Mar. 29.. 

Yankee Madness Larkin-Dove April 5. 

His Forgotten Wife IK-Iiamv- Baxter Apul 12. 



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FIRST NATIONAL 

Anna Christie Blanche Sweet Dec- 
Twenty -one Richard Barthelmess Dec. 

Boy of Mine Ben Alexander Dec 

The Warners Marie Prevost Dec 

Thundergate Owen Moore Dec. 

Her Temporary Husband Sydney Chaplin Dec 

The Dangerous Maid Constance Talmadge Dec 

Jealous Husbands Maurice Tournear prod. ...Dec 

Black Oxen Corinne Griffith Jan. 

The Song of Love Norma Talmadge Jan. 

The Love Master "Strongheart" Jan. 

Painted People Colleen Moore Feb. 

When A Man's A Man John Bowers Feb. 

Flowing Gold Nilsson-Sills Mar. 

Lilies of the Field Corinne Griffith Mar. 

The Galloping Fish Tho«. II Ince prod Mar. 

Secrets Norma Talmadge April 

The Enchanted Cottage Richard Barthelmess April 



1 7,0*1 

1 6.560 

8 7.000 

8 4.871 

15 6,565 

22 6723 

22 7.337 

29 * 500 

1» 7JB 

19 MM 

1» 1779 

9 5.7UU 

16 6.910 

1 8,005 

22 8.510 

22 6.000 

5 8.345 

19 7,120 



FOX FILM CORP. 

The Governor's Lady Harry Milarde prod. Jan. 5 7.00 

Johnnie's Swordlish Instructive Jan 5 1.000" 

Arabia's Last Alarm Imperial comedy Jan. 12 2.000 

Gentle Julia Bessie Love J*b- 19 

Spring Fever Harry ><* ret Jan. 19 2,000 

Hoodman Jlind David Butler Jan. » 5.434 

The Canadian Alps Instructive Jan. 26 1,000 

Just Off Broadway John Gilbert Feb. 2 5.444 

Not A Drum Was Heard Charles "Buck" Jones Feb. » 4.823 

The Net Barbara Castleton Feb. 9 6.000 

Highly Recommended Al St. John Feb. 9 2.000 

Shadow of the East Fell tared cast Feb. 16 5.874 

School Pals Imperial comedy Feb. 16 2,000 

Ladies to Hoard Tom Mix Feb. 23 6.112 

The Blizzard featured cast Mar. 1 5.800 

Frogland Special Mar. 1 1.000 

Love Letters Shirley Mason Mar. 8 4749 

The Weakling Sunshine comedy Mar. 8 2.000 

A Sculptor's Paradise Instructive Mar. 8 1,000 

The Wolf Man John Gilbert Mar. 15 5.145 

Be Yourself Al St. John Mar. 15 2,000 

Rivers of Song Instructive Mar. 15 1.000 

The Vagabond Trail Charles Jones Mar. 22 4. 562 

The Cowboys Imperial comedy Mar. 22 2.000 

Feathered Fishermen Instructive Mar. 22 1.000 

The Arizona Express Charle* Tones Mar. 29 6.316 

The Plunderer Frank Mayo April S 2,000 

On the Job Chimpanzees April 12 5,041 

A Man's Mate John Gilbert April 12 1.000 

A New England Farm instructive April S 5,812 

GOLDWYN 

Through the Dark Colleen Moore Tan. 19 7.900 

Ynlan.la Marion Davies Mar. 1 12000 

Wild Oranges King Vidor prod Mar. 15 7.000 

Nellie, the Beautiful Cloak Model... Star cast April 5 7,000 

Three Weeks Pringle Nagle April 12 7.540 

Recoil Rly the -Hamilton 

Greed Von Stroheim prod 

True As Steel Rupert Hughes prod 

Janice Meredith Marion Davies 

Second You'h Star cast 

The Rejected Woman Nagel-Rubens '. 

Second Youth gtar cast April 19 6.169 

HODKINSON 

The Life of Reflly C. C. Burr Comedy Oct. 27 

The Old Fool James Barrows Dec » 

Grit nienn Hunter Jasx. 12. 

Love's Whirlpool KirkwooH I.ee Mar. 22 

The Hoosier Schoolmaster Henrv Hull Mar. 29 

His Darker Self Lloyd Hamilton April 5 



Try and Get Tt 
Which Shall It 



2000 
6.147 

S.onr. 
6028 
5.SS6 
.5.000 



Be? 



Brvant Washburn April 12 5.607 

Star cast April 19 5.000 



METRO 



Pleasure Mad R Barker prod Nov. 

Scaramouche Rex Ingram prod Oct. 

In Search of • Thrill Viola Dana Nov. 

A Wife's Romance Clara K. Young Nov. 

Shooting of Dan McGrew Barbara LaMarr : 

Our Hospitality Buster Keaton Nov. 

Fashion Row Mae Murrav Dec 

Haif a Dollar-Bin Anna O. N'ilsson Dec. 

The Heart Bandit Viola Dana Tan. 

The Fool's Awakening Harrison Ford Feb. 

The Man Life Passed By Novak Marmont Mar. 

Thv Nimt T« Woman Moni; f » Marr Mar. 

The Uninvited Guest Jean Tollev Mar. 

Happiness Laurette Tavlor Mar. 

Women Who Give Pe^mlH Barker prod Mar 

A Boy of Flanders Jackie Coogan April 

The Shooting of Dan McGrew Star cast April 



24... 

8... 
15... 
19... 
16... 

1... 

1... 

8... 

8... 
22... 

5.. 
12... 



. 7.547 

. 9.600 

. 5.500 

. 6.000 

". 6.220 
. 7.300 

5. 

4.W0 

. 5763 
. 6.200 
. 9.087 
. 6.145 
7.700 
7.500 
. .7,018 
6.318 



May 3, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



97 



(Continued from preceding page) 

PATHE 



Rat's Revenge Terry cartoon ... 

Man Who Would Not Die "Frontier" series 

J tut A Minute Charles Chase ... 

Picking Peaches Sennett comedy . 

The Cowboy Sheik Will Rogers .... 

Big Business "Our Gang" 

Powder and Smoke Charles Chase ... 

Animal Athletes "Sportlight" 

Good Old Days Terry cartoon ... 

The Man Pays "Dippy -doo-dad" 

A Rural Romance Terry cartoon ... 

Among the Missing Will Nigh Miniat 

Postage Due Stan Laurel 

The Man Who Smiled "Frontier" series 

Peter Stuyvesant "Chronicles of A 

Half Back of Notre Dame Sennett comedy .. 

Olympic Mermaids "Sportlight" 



White Man Who Turned Indian "Frontier" serii 

Hard Knocks Charles Chase 

The Cake Eater Will Rogers .. 

Love's Detour Charles Chase 

The National Rash "Sportlight" .. 

The All Star Cast Terry cartoon . 

The Buccaneers "Our Gang" .. 



Love's Reward 
The Mandan's 



Fields of Glory "Sportlight" .. 

Hunters Bold "Spat Family" 

From Rags to Riches & Back Again. Terry cartoon 
Don't Forget Charles Chase . 



Review 


j. e jj 


2 


Feb 


2 


Feb 


2 


Feb 


2 


Feb 


2 


Feb 


9 


Feb 


9 


Feb 


9 


Feb 


9 


Feb. 


16 


Feb 


16 


Feb 


16 


Feb 


16 


Feb 


1 fi 


Feb. 


23 


Feb 


23 


Feb 


9 \ 
















] 












c 


Mar 






Q 






Mar 


1 e 




1 5 




15 




1 c 


Mar 


22 




22 


Mar. 


22 




22, 




22 


Mar. 


22 




29 




29 




29 




29 




29 




79 



Footage 
.... 1.000 
.... 2,000 
.... 1,000 



2.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



2,000 
2,000 
1.000 
2.000 
2.000 
1,000 
1.000 
2,000 



1,000 



1,000 



The Champion Terry cartoon 

Dirty Little Half Breed Frontier series ..... 

Seein' Things "Our Gang" April 5 2,000 

Birds of Passage Bird Novelty April 5 3,000 

Running Wild Terry cartoon April 5 1,000 

Friend Husband Snub Pollard April S 1,000 

The Swift and Strong "Sportlight" April 5 1.000 

Girl-Shy Harold Lloyd April 12 7,457 

Our Little Nell "Dippy-doo-dad" April 12 1,000 

Medicine Hat Frontier series April 12 2,000 

Brothers Upder the Chin Stan Laurel April 12 2.000 

Gateway of the West 8th Chronicle April 19 3,000 

The Hollywood Kid Sennett comedy April 19 2,000 

Hit the High Spots "Spat Family" April 19 2.000 

One At a Time Earl Mohan April 19 1,000 

If Noah Lived Today Terry cartoon April 19 1,000 

A Trip to the Pole Terry cartoon April 26 1.000 

Sun and Snow "Sportlight" April 26 1.000 

Get Busy Snub Pollard April 26 1.000" 

Highbrow Stuff Will Rogers April 26 2.000 

Flickering Youth * Sennett comedy April 26 2,000 

PLAYGOERS PICTURES 

Counterfeit Love Featured cast June 30 6.000 

Tipped Off Featured cast Nov. 3 4,284 

PREFERRED PICTURES 

April Showers Colleen Moore Nov. 17... 

The Virginian Kenneth Harlan Nov. 24... 

Maytimr Ethel Shannon Dec. 8... 

Poisoned Paradise Lenneth Harlan Mar. 8... 



6,J. 
8,0 
7.3 
6,800 



SELZNICK 

The Common Law Corrine Griffith Nov. 10 7.500 

Daughters of Today Patsy Ruth Miller Mar. 15 7.000 

Woman to Woman Betty Compson April 26 6,804 

TRUART FILM CORP. 

The Unknown Purple Henry B. Walthall Dec. 8 6.950 

Drums of Jeopardy Elaine Hammerstein Man 15 6,529 

On Time Richard Talmadge Mar. 15 6,630 



UNITED ARTISTS 



Rosita Mary 

A Woman of Paris Chas. 



Tickford Sept. 15. 

Chaplin prod Oct. 13. 



8.800 
8,000 



. Mar. 
. Mar 



4,717 
2.00O 
2 000 
1.000 
1.000 
5.310 
2 000 
1.000 
2.000 



w Footage 

8 6,263 

8 2,000 

8 2,000 

8 1,000 

15 6,800 

15 2,000 

15 2,000 

15 1,000 

15 4,389 

22.. 
22.. 
22. 
29. 
S. 
29. 



4,742 
2,000 
1,000 
4,531 
1,000 
2,000 
.4,561 
.2,000 
.1,000 
2,000 
. 1,000 
. 4,913 
5,303 



The Law Forbids Baby Peggy 

Swing Bad, the Sailor "Leather Pushers" . 

Sons In Law Century comedy Mar. 

Should Poker Players Marry? Neely Edwards Mar. 

Fool's Highway Virginia Valli Mar. 

Big Boy Blue "Leather Pushers" Mar. 

The Oriental Game "PaT'-Century Mar. 

Keep Healthy Slim Summcrville Mar. 

l'hantom Horseman Jack Hoxie Mar. 

Stolen Secrets Herbert Rawlinson Mar. 

The Young Tenderfoot Buddy Messinger Mar. 

Nobody to Love Neely Edwards Mar. 

The Night Message Gladys Hulette Mar. 

Ship Ahoy Bobby Dunn Mar. 

That's Rich Arthur Trimble Mar. 

The Galloping Ace Jack Hoxie April 

Hit Him Hard Jack Earle April 

Marry When Young Neely Edwards April 

Checking Out "PaJ the dog April 

Spring of 1964 Neely Edwards April 

Excitement Laura LaPIante April 

The Storm Daughter Priscilla Dean April 

The Racing Kid Buddy Messinger April 

Forty Horse Hawkins Hoot Gibson April 

One Wet Night Neely Edwards April 

Pretty Plungers Follies Girls April 

VITAGRAPH 

The Leavenworth Case W. Bennett prod Nov. 24 5,400 

The Man From Brodney's Special cast Dec. 8 7,100 

The Ninety and Nine David Smith prod Dec. 23 6,800 

Modern Banking Urban Classic Dec. 22 1,000 

Newsprint Paper Urban Classic Dec. 22 1,000 

Horseshoes Larry Semon Dec. 22 2,000 

The Last Stand of Red Man Urban classic Dec. 29 1,000 

Let Not Man Put Asunder Feature cast Jan. 26 8,000 

My Man Pnt.iv Ruth Miller Feb 21 6.800 

Virtuous Liars David Powell April 19 5,650 

Between Friends Blackton prod April 26 6,900 

WARNER BROTHERS 

Lucretia Lombard Irene Rich Dec. 22 7,500 

The Marriage Circle Ernest Lubitsch prod Feb. 16 8,500 

Conductor 1492 Johnny Hines Feb. 23 6,500 

Daddies Belasco play Feb. 23 6,800 

George Washington, Jr Wesley Barry Mar. 22 6.700 

Beau Brummel John Barrymore April 12 10,000 



19 2,000 

26 5,149 

26 1.000 

26 2,000 



UNIVERSAL 

Why Wait? Slim Sumi..erville Jan. 26 1,000 

Own a Lot Century comedy .Jan. 26 2.000 

Sporting Youth Reginald Denny Feb. 2 6.712 

Such Is Life Baby Peggy Feb. 2 2.000 

Girls Will Be Girls "Leather Pushers" Feb. 2 2.000 

Miscarried Plans Bob Reeves Feb. 2 2.000 

The Mandarin Neely Edwards Feb. 2 1,000 

The Breathless Moment William Desmond Feb. 9 5.556 

Keep Going Century comedy Feb. 9 2,000 

Hats Off 1'ete Morrison Feb. 9 2.000 

Down in Jungle Town "Joe Martin" Feb. 9 1,000 

The Fast Express . Wm. Duncan Serial Feb. 9. 

Jack 0' Cubs Herbert Rawlinson Feb. 16. 

Lone Larry Eileen Sedgwick Feb. 16. 

You're Next Century comedy Feb. 16. 

The Jail Bird Neely Edwards Feb. 16. 

Memorial to Woodrow Wilson Special Feb. 16. 

Ride For Your Life Hoot Gibson Mar. 1. 

A Society Sensation Valentino (reissue) Mar. 1. 

The Very Bad Man Neely Edwards Mar. 1. 

Peg O* the Mounted Baby Peggy Msr. I. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Review Footage 

APPROVED PICTURES CORP. 

Rough Ridin' Buddy Roosevelt April 26 4,670 

GRAND-ASCHER DISTRIBUTING CORP. 



2,000 
2.000 
7,541 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
5.591 
5,934 



Lucky Rube Sid Smith Nov. 

Mark It Paid Joe Rock Nov. 

The Way Men Love Elliot Dexter Nov. 

A Dark Knight Joe Rock Dec. 

Hollywood Bound Sid Smith Dec. 

Taxi, Pleasel Monty Banks Dec. 

The Satin Girl Mabel Forrest Dec. 

Other Men's Daughters Ben Wilson prod Jan. 

CHARLES C. BURR 

The Average Woman All star cast Feb. 2 6.000 

Restless Wives Doris Kenyon Feb. 16 6.000 

Three O'Clock in the Morning Constance Binney Feb. 23 6.293 

C. B. C. 

Hallroom Boys Twice a month 2,000 

The Barefoot Boy Star cast Nov. 24 5,800 

Forgive and Forget Estelle Taylor Nov. 10 5,800 

The Marriage Market ...Pauline Garon Dec. 29 6,297 

Innocence Anna Q. Nilsson Jan. 26 5.923 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 

The Thief of Bagdad Douglas Fairbanks Mar. 29 12,000 

PHIL GOLDSTONE 

His Last Race "Snowy" Baker Sept. 1 5.000 

Danger Ahead Richard Talmadge Dec. 29 $.000 

The White Panther Rex (Snowy) Baker Feb. 9 4.000 

Marry in Haste William Fairbanks Mar. 8 5,000 

D. W. GRIFFITH, INC. 

America Feature cast Mar. 8 14,000 

INDEPENDENT PICTURES CORP. 

Way of the Transgressor George Larkin Sept. 22 5,000 

In the Spider's Web Alice Dean Sept. 29 

LEE-BRADFORD 

Shaiti-rrd Reputations Johnnie Walker Oct. 27 5.000 

LOWELL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



Floodgates John Lowell Mar. 8 7,000 

MONOGRAM PICTURES 

The M.isk of Lopez Fred Thompson Nov. 24 4.9110 

The Whipping Boss Star cast Dec. 8 5.800 

ROCKETT-LINCOLN CORP. 

Abraham Lincoln George A. Billings 000*1 1 n3 4 

WM. STEINER PROD. 

Surging Seas Charles Hutchinson April 26 4,700 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 3, 1924 



Skillful cinematography exacts accurate re- 
production — from highest light to deepest 
shadow the full scale of tones in the negative 
must be secured in the print. 

EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

Gives faithful reproduction no matter how 
delicate the detail. Look for the identifica- 
tion — "Eastman" and "Kodak'' — in black 
letters in the transparent margin. 

Eastman Film, both regular and 
tinted base, is available in thou- 
sand foot lengths. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 





POWER'S 

Aspheric Condenser Mount 

for Incandescent Projection 
Ready June 1st 

NOW MADE IN THE POWER'S PLANT. THIS IS A GENUINE 
POWER'S PRODUCT AND BEARS THE STAMP "N. P. CO." 



POWER'S ASPHERIC CONDENSER MOUNT 
IS DESIGNED forthe CINEPHORCONDENSER 

This condenser is made of optical heat-resisting glass and is 
densing lens system. An increase in illumination of ap 
cent is secured by this system as compared with the pris 



a two-element con- 
proximately fifty per- 
matic condenser. 




MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



HAROLD LLOYD 



GIRL SHY 



CROWDS! CROWDS! CROWDS! 

AT NEW YORK'S STRAND 



Marvellous and Overwhelming Testimony as to the 
Greatness of Lloyd and the Pulling Power 
of His Latest Picture 

Long before the opening at 1 .30 p. m. on Sunday, April 20, 
there was a constantly increasing line before New York's 
Strand. 

At 10.45 p. m. there was still a line extending- way around 
the corner. Throughout the showing people were stand- 
ing ten deep inside. Thousands were turned away. 

Lloyd is a capacity star, and "Girl Shy" is a capacity pictivre 

Watch records go glimmering! 



IN 




A Pathe Picture 



Independen 




N u m b e 



Moving" Picture 




Vol. 68, No. 2 



May 10, 1924 



PRICE 25 CENTS 



ADOLPH ZU K.OR AND 
JESSE L LASKY PRESENT 




Published by CHALMERS PUBLISHING COMPANY SSw'KBcSS 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 





f Fast 
, Steppe^ 




^Excitement 



£ools 
Highway 





7Ae 

stoim 




White 
Tiger 





UNIVERSAL PICTURES COj 

CARL LAEMMLE , President 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



103 




Bi£ ones now 
o now 

now 



t 



I lAMOUsPLAyERS-LASKYC(JRP I 



-PPISIDINT 




Cecil B, DeMille's 

^TK HUMPH* 

With Leatrice Joy, Rod La Rocque and big all-star 
cast. Screen play by Jeanie Macpherson, based on May 
Edginton's popular novel. A gorgeous modern love 
story. 

Gloria Swan son 

in XN A Society Scandal" 

ALLAN DWAN Production from Alfred Sutro's play, 
"The Laughing Lady." Screen play by Forrest Halsey. 
Now making even better records than "The Humming 
Bird"! 

Thomas Meighan 

in*7he Confidence Man 

As usual, a great big hit! From the story by L. Y. 
Erskine and Robert H. Davis. Directed by Victor 
Heerman. Adapted by Paul Sloane. Titles by George 
. Ade. 

(paramount (pictures 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 




EDUCATIONAL 
FILM EXCHANGES, Inc. 



May 10, MOVING PICTURE WORLD 

MILLIONS 

have read his books 




50,000,000 People 

Have read these stories by 

Harold Bell WRIGHT 

WHEN A MAN'S A MAN 

(A first rJVationa/ <Jit raction 

(The MINE WITH THE IRON DOOR 

£N"ext to be pLctuved 

Th e WINNING of BARBARA WORTH 
THAT PRINTER OF UDELL'S 
The SHEPHERD of the HILLS 
The CALLINC of DAN MATHEWS 
THEIR YESTERDAYS 
The> EYES of THE WORLD 
The RECREATION of BRYAN KENT 
Hi e UNCROWNED KING 
HELEN of THE OLD HOUSE 

Published by D. Appleton &* Co - 
Principal Pictures Corporation 

Sol Lesser ,P'-e<tdent 

Sole Owners of Production. 




capture a ready-made American, audience 



them on the screen 



118 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



"Packs 'em in at the 
Metropolitan, Washington, D. 



What the Critics said: 



POST: 



"This picture packed 'em in 
at the Metropolitan yester- 
day and last night. The pro- 
duction is a gorgeous thing." 



EVENING STAR: 

"Is a gorgeous picture. 

Action is superb." 

DAILY NEWS: 

"Masterful direction by 

Edwin Carewe." 



Put down another "hit" for 
FIRST NATIONAL 




Edwin Carewe 

presents 




IA SON i 

OF THE 

SAHARA 



From the novel by LOUISE GERARD 
with 

BERT LYTELL, CLAIRE WINDSOR, 
WALTER McGRAIL ROSEMARY THE BY, 
MONTAGUE LOVE, PAUL PANZER 

Directed by-^ - -EDWIN CAREWE 




J Foieign R.ghu Contiolled by V_ 
lA»ooit*d Fiiit Nation*] [Vturc* Inc.] 



! 



U FIRST NATIONAL PIC 





MoviKg Picture 

WORLD 

Founded jn ltyO? &y J. P. Chalmers 




From New Orleans 

Millions in Concrete and Steel —A Well Balanced General Staff — 
Something New in Spectacle — On the Home Front and the Foreign Field 



NEW ORLEANS, April 26 (Special)— We are 
seated in the lobby of the St. Charles Hotel. 
Brushing shoulders with a man from Okla- 
homa, calling a howdy to a Los Angeles visitor, 
exchanging smiles with a Chicagoan, and borrow- 
ing a match from a New Yorker. 

This is the annual meeting of Associated First 
National Pictures, Inc. — a producing and dis- 
tributing organization. But the stockholders of 
the producing and distributing company happen 
also to be exhibitors — and exhibitors first and last. 

You get it in the conversation, gather it from the 
attitude, note it in the atmosphere — these are 
exhibitors in training and viewpoint. 

And you decide that this must be a mighty good 
thing for any producing and distributing organi- 
zation. 

For you suddenly visualize the tremendous in- 
vestment in concrete and steel, rents and mort- 
gages, theatre seats and ticket windows! A 
veritable city of theatres and dazzling electric 
signs; a heavy responsibility and an ever-present 
demand for good pictures, better pictures, more 
efficient industrial methods. 

Here, indeed, are men who must keep their feet 
on the ground — in front of the box-office. 

A FIGURE tall and broad of shoulders passes 
you. The cool and calm Hoosier in his face, 
but you wouldn't call it cold; the jaw of a 
bull-dog, but you imagine he's the type of bull-dog 
that saves up his fighting for times when it is 
needed. 

Robert Lieber. President of First National for 
these many years. But the men you see about this 
lobby have done more than elect him president 
time after time. There is more than association, 
respect, and admiration in their glances and their 
words. There is something akin to affection. 



Again you say — a mighty good thing for any 
organization. 

From the impressive presence of a Lieber to 
the shrewd, unruffled deliberation of a Harry 
Schwalbe; to the quick-witted producer-minded 
Dick Rowland; to the theatre sense of Sam Katz, 
E. V. Richards, A. H. Blank, George Trendle, Sol 
Lesser, John Kunsky, Jacob Fabian- 

That's balance. We'll say so. 



FROM the hotel lobby you journey to a 
theatre. For the first showing — "on any 
screen, gentlemen!" — of "The Sea Hawk," a 
Frank Lloyd production. 

Something like a million dollars of cold hard cash 
is going to be unrolled before your eyes. No part 
of the million came from your pockets — but, even 
so, you acquire a personal feeling of anxiety. You 
wait impatiently for the first title. 

Then it comes. While they are planting the 
characters you think to yourself, "Well, what can 
they do that hasn't been done before? Gosh, a 
million dollars is a lot of money!" 

Now there's action, more action — and then a 
wallop! A new thrill; a new spectacle! That 
doesn't express it — "new" has been worn out. Well, 
there's nothing else — unless we put it: NEW . 

Here is romance, but not of your stuffy palace 
corridors; here is action, but not merely the flash 
of duelling swords. Here is the sweep of far-flung 
action on pirate seas; here is the heart-pull of 
grimy, toiling, naked galley-slaves; here is the 
crash of ship upon ship, the color of Oriental slave 
markets. 

Before the story has proceeded far you begin to 
feel anxiously that it is your own million at stake; 
you leave the theatre with a care-free smile de- 
claring, "It's worth another million." 



120 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



{Continued from Preceding Page) 
It's two o'clock in the morning. Not the best 
hour to show a picture. But the final fade-out 
brings a franchise holder — who really had a part 
of that million — to his feet shouting: 
"Three cheers for Dick Rowland!" 
Rowland counters: "No, you mean three cheers 
for Frank Lloyd." They are given. A score of 
convention-tired business men — theatre men — are 
on their feet. They want to cheer — anybody, 
everybody. 

They have reason to. "The Sea Hawk" weighs 
to the mark; Sabatini for colorful story; Lloyd for 
able direction; Milton Sills for a remarkable piece 
of romantic acting; and Wallace Beery — well, you 
know Wallace. 

* * * 

BACK in the hotel lobby. Someone tells you 
that George Trendle has been elected to the 
executive board. 
You want to congratulate somebody, and finish 
by congratulating yourself. Because you figure 
this will probably bring George Trendle to New 
York oftener. Maybe you ought to sympathize 
with John Kunsky. 

But New York can use more and more of the 
George Trendies. Here's the type: Doesn't say 
much. Doesn't say you are the greatest fellow that 
ever lived, and repeat to the next chap. Conversely : 
Isn't going to be flattered a bit if you assure him 
he is the greatest that ever breathed. Hasn't a 
surplus of free opinions on the past, present and 
future of all things on tap; but has opinions — and 
judgment — to dispense at the right time, and the 
right place. 

They wanted that judgment on the executive 
board — the judgment that John Kunsky has 
leaned on. 

* * * 

PERSONALITY plus— Edward Eschmann, 
manager of sales for First National. The 
kind of sales manager they grow in Chicago 
— where sales managers are born and the growth 
is merely a finishing off process. 

You could put him at the head of a sales force or 
an army with equal confidence. Because if sales- 
men wouldn't go out and fight like soldiers for 
that type — well, they're not salesmen. 

Personality is only half the story. Don't forget 
the "plus." The men know that the Eddie Esch- 
mann type ''goes through" for his doughboys; that 
he is in the battle with them; that there may be 
politics at home, but none in the army. 



There's more to that "plus." A solid grounding 
in merchandising principles that dates back of the 
picture business. Further developed in the best 
of film atmosphere. 

Add it all up. Quite a sum. It's correct. 
* * * 

FIRST NATIONAL'S turning to production 
under its own direction was antedated by 
similar action in another field. Arid with 
equal success. 

If memory is right it is something like two years 
ago that E. B. Johnson, veteran of Turner and 
Dahnken days, an executive of First National since 
its inception, took the burden of direct foreign 
marketing on his shoulders. 

At the New Orleans meetings we found an air 
of satisfaction and confidence on the foreign situ- 
ation. Very confident and pretty well satisfied. 
The reasons? E. B. Johnson is among the first. 
But he wouldn't tell you so. He'd mention the 
pictures, and then he might tell you this: 

"There isn't a country on the globe where First 
National is attempting to do business with its 
destinies in the hands of an American. It is just 
as impossible for an American to get another 
country's viewpoint as well as a native as it is for 
a dog to talk like a parrot. England is England, 
English theatre owners are Englishmen; Sweden 
is Sweden, and so on. First National's foreign 
policy is built on the basis that foreign policy 
begins abroad." 

IT wouldn't be possible to close these lines from 
New Orleans without a w r ord regarding South- 
ern hospitality as exemplified by the Saenger 
Amusement Company. 

We didn't see any key to the city but that must 
have been because it was thrown in the Mississippi 
during the duration of the First National meeting. 

From Julian Saenger and E. V. Richards down, 
from top to bottom and back again, every member 
of the Saenger organization constituted himself a 
host. If ever the humdrum of serious business 
meetings was punctuated by warm periods of wel- 
come — this was the time. 

New Orleans may rank as a one and a half per 
cent territory on film percentages, but the Saengers 
have added to that one and a half a figure of ninety- 
nine and forty-four hundredths on hospitality. 
And that totals one hundred per cent plus. 



Other news and views of the First National meet- 
ing at New Orleans will be found on Page 123. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



121 




FACTS 

AND 

FIGURES 

In offering to mem- 
bers of the Motion 
Picture Industry the 
facilities of a well 
equipped brokerage 
organization, we 
stress the services of 
our Statistical Depart- 
ment. 

It is our hope that 
you will consult with 
us regarding your in- 
vestments and permit 
us to supply figures 
and data to aid you in 
determination of their 
value. 

Our office at 15 3 1 
Broadway, Second 
Floor, Astor Theatre 
Building, is prepared 
to handle all inquiries. 



NEWBURGER, 
HENDERSON 
and LOEB 



Members 

New York and Philadelphia 
Stock Exchanges 

100 BROADWAY 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

202 Fifth Avenue 

at 25th Street 

1531 Broadway 

at 45th Street 

511 Fifth ATenne 

at 43rd Street 

PHILADELPHIA : 
1512 Walnut Street 



Moving' Picture 

WORLD 

ROBERT E. WELSH EDITOR 

Published Weekly by 
CHALMERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
516 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Member Audit Bureau Circulation 

John F. Chalmers, president; Alfred J. Chalmers, vice-presi- 
dent; James P. Chalmers, Sr., vice-president; Eliza J. Chalmers, 
secretary and treasurer, and Ervin L. Hall, business manager. 

Branch Offices: 28 East Jackson Boulevard, Chicago; W. E. 
Keefe, 1962 Cheromoya Avenue, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Editorial Staff: Ben H. Grimm, Associate Editor; John A. 
Archer, Managing Editor. 

Manager of Circulation : Dennis J. Shea. 

Subscription price : United States and its possessions, Mexico 
and Cuba, $3.00 a year; Canada, $3.50; foreign countries (post- 
paid), $10.00 a year. Copyright, 1924, Chalmers Publishing Co. 
Copyright throughout Great Britain and Colonies, under the 
provisions of the Copyright Act of 1911. (All rights reserved.) 

Other publications: Cine Mundial (Spanish). Technical books. 



VOLUME 68 



NUMBER 2 



Features 

Editorial 119 

Marcus Loew's Career a Stirring Romance of Business. . . 122 
Special Independent Section: Complete Data on Activities 

and Forthcoming Productions 127 to 174 

The Play from the Picture Angle 210 

News of the Week 

Famous Players-Lasky Announces Its "Famous Forty" 

for Next Season 125 

Vitagraph to Announce Production Plans at Big Chicago 

Sales Meeting 126 

Illinois Theatre Owners Hold Big Convention 207 

I. M. P. P. D. A. to Establish Offices oh West Coast. . . 207 
Will Hays Tells Pen Women Scenario Needs of the 

Industry 194 

Eastern Missouri and Southern Illinois Merged Into One 

Body at Big Convention 195 

Powers Airs Views on Trade Commission's Decision 200 

Music .Tax Situation Brighter After Hearing in 

Washington 205 

Ten Big Productions Listed for Summer by First 

National 206 

Goldwyn Has Many Big Productions in Works 207 

Departments 

Exhibitors' News and Views 175 

Straight-from-the-Shoulder Reports 181 

Selling the Picture to the Public 212 

With the Advertising Brains 219 

Reviews 223 

Pep of the Program 226 

Better Equipment 231 

Projection 232 

Releases 228 



One of a Series 

The Hamilton 
National Bank 

130 West 42nd Street 

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"Talk it over with a bank- 
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But an essential comple- 
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Get acquainted with Ham- 
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They have been termed 
"The Utmost in Service." 

The reasons are many: 
Hamilton National is an 
Independent Bank, not a 
branch; its facilities are 
world-wide ; its attitude is 
courteous and helpful; its 
location convenient ; its 
hours 9 — 10.30 conveni- 
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cilities unexcelled. 

M^st important of all: 
Hamilton National's of- 
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Today — any day — for a 
frank talk on your bank- 
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lamilton Natioial Bank 

130 West 42nd Street 

(Bush Terminal BIdf.) 

New York City 

Open 9 A. M. lilt 10.30 P. U. 
Our Deposit Vaults — open at the 
same hours — are admitted to be 
the best equipped in the city. 



22 MOVING PICTURE WORLD May 10, 1924 

The Story of the New York Boy Who Won Success by Battling 



Up 
the 

Ladder — 
Unaided 

Marcus Loew's Meteoric 
Career a Stirring 



Romance of Business 

TpDITOR'S NOTE: There are two very important 
reasons for our publication at this time of the fas- 
cinating life story of Marcus Loew. The first is the 
natural newspaper reason developed by the recent mergers 
that have brought Marcus Loew into even greater prom- 
inence — if that were possible — than he has been. Nineteen 
twenty-four will find Marcus Loew the figure on whom 
all eyes are focused. Further reason for telling the real 
story at this time is the fact that a correspondent of 
Moving Picture World, in Boston last week, inadver- 
tently garbled the facts of Marcus Loevf s life, and also — 
incorrectly — managed to link his name with that of one 
Elias Loew, of New England. 

THERE is no more stirring romance of business than the 
story of Marcus Loew — the story of a boy born in lowly 
circumstances in New York City who has risen to the 
topmost heights of this industry — the story of a lad who battled 
adversity — and who won fame and fortune. 

Today Mr. Loew is the owner and operator of the largest 
and longest chain of theatres in the world, and the leading spirit 
in one of the biggest motion picture producing and distributing 
organizations in the business. Yesterday — a yesterday not so 
long passed — he tasted the bitterness of repeated defeats and 
disappointments. 

Birthplace Site of Theatre 

A peculiar fact that has recently come to light is that the 
identical house in Avenue B, New York City, in which Mr. 
Loew was born is now the site of one of his most popular 
theatres. 

Mr. Loew revealed an active interest in the theatrical life of 
New York almost since he took his first steps. At the tender 
age of seven he saved his pennies to buy a ten-cent ticket 
admitting him to the "peanut gallery" of the old National 
Theatre. Two years later, having "finished" with school, he 
entered the newspaper field, and sold "uxtries" from sunset to 
midnight in the theatre district at that time. 

He spent a year in a map-printing concern, where he earned 
the large sum of thirty-five cents a day. One morning he 
joined the strikers, who demanded a raise of five cents, lost out, 
and, at the mature age of ten, found himself jobless. 

Becomes Newspaper Man 

After a short spell of loafing he, with another lad, started the 



East Side Advertiser, young Loew acting as editor, manager, 
copy and proofreader, writer of advertisements, subscription 
agent, solicitor and collector. The partners shared about 
twenty dollars a week profit, but the envy of his partner's wife 
led to quarrels and recriminations, and he walked out of the 
Advertiser's office and became an errand boy in a shop on 
Grand Street. 

After various experiences as a merchant-messenger, weaver 
and salesman the future theatrical magnate found himself, at 
the age of twenty-three, with a fortune of a few hundred 
dollars and a beautiful bride. 

Unfortunate Investment 

He invested his money in an unfortunate business venture, 
and, when he had settled with his creditors, found he possessed 
exactly seven dollars and a clear conscience. 

He would not acknowledge himself a failure, however, and, 
with an equally courageous and determined young man, started 
a jobbing business, specializing in women's capes and coats. 
It was a good choice, and, though many of his competitors 
went down with the flood of "bad times," Mr. Loew and his 
partner weathered the storm, and soon found themselves on the 
road to possessing a comfortable fortune. 

It is just twenty years now — in 1904 — since Mr. Loew first 
ventured into the theatrical game. He met some people who 
planned a penny arcade on Fourteenth Street, opposite Union 
Square, New York. A friend offered to get him a share of 
this, at that time, unique business, and Mr. Loew, optimistic 
and confident, said he would chance it. 

Invested $40,000 

He invested $40,000 in the venture, and at the end of six 
months received back that amount, together with a nice profit. 
This made him think. What followed is characteristic. He 
gathered together every dollar he owned and built a circuit of 
penny arcades from New York to the Middle West. For a 
while it looked as if he had risked all for nothing. 

But the Loew arcades, with their attractive buildings and 
pretty, painted exteriors, finally won the public's patronage. In 
five short months he had banked $250,000, all in one-cent pieces. 

From that time he built and operated penny arcades and 
moving picture theatres in dozens of towns and various 
neighborhoods. His film houses were all sizes. Some were 
large enough for 100 spectators. 

Soon Number 40 in New York 

His daring and farsightedness were amazing. In less than 
half a year the Loew theatres numbered about forty in New 
York alone. His failures were ancient stories, and he now had 
reached a point where he was reckoned one of the wealthy 
members of the theatre guild. 

His debut as a vaudeville producer was made under some- 
what interesting circumstances. A stranded actor sought him 
for any kind of engagement to tide him over a distressful 
period. The man was engaged to recite popular poems in Mr. 
Loew's theatre while the moving picture reels were being 
changed. From this meagre beginning developed the impor- 
tant vaudeville feature of the Loew houses. His success was 
immediate and his financial returns enormous. 

First to Charge a Dime 

He was the first to open a movie at a dime admission. His 
opening venture in that line was in Brooklyn, at the old Cosy 
Corner Theatre. . His success with "hoodoo" places has been 
tremendous. He has been named the veritable King Midas 
of theatres. 

His entry into the producing and distributing end of the 
motion picture business enlarged mightily his scope for 
furnishing relaxation for the "tired business man" and 
enlightenment for the young and impressionable. His standing 
as an amusement provider and as a financial power is a monu- 
ment to American spirit, thrift and courage. 



May 10, 1924 MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



Famous Players-Lasky Announces 

Release of Forty Paramount Pictures 



IN the belief that next season will be the 
most successful in the history of motion 
pictures, the Famous Players-Lasky 
Corporation announces the release of forty 
Paramount pictures from August 1 to Feb- 
ruary 1. 

Several of these productions have already 
been completed, and in order that the others 
may be ready by release date, an unprece- 
dented production program has just been 
inaugurated at the Paramount studios in 
Hollywood and Long Island City. 

In announcing these forty new pictures 
the Paramount organization has issued the 
following statement : 

"Solid success and achievement is not an 
accident in any business. It has not been 
accidental with Paramount. 

"For twelve years — month in and month 
out, year in and year out — we have pro- 
duced the pictures that have been the back- 
bone of this industry. 

"The record has been the fruit of careful 
planning, clear thinking, intelligent applica- 
tion of resources, progressive policies, plus 
a great producing and distributing organi- 
zation. 

"From our studios have come a splendid 
and consistent line of pictures — from the 
days of 'Queen Elizabeth,' 'The Squaw Man,' 
'Stella Maris,' 'Male and Female,' 'The Mir- 
acle Man,' '2Z]/ 2 Hours' Leave,' Humoresque,' 
'The Sheik,' 'Manslaughter,' 'Blood and 
Sand,' 'Back Home and Broke,' down to the 
latest Paramount success, 'The Humming 
Bird,' released only the other day. 

"In addition to making money for exhib- 
itors, this consistent Paramount program has 
done two things : 

"1. Steadily raised the plane of motion pic- 
ture entertainment, while increasing the size 
of the motion picture public. 

"2. Enabled the exhibitors to build for the 
future, confident that their investment of 
millions of dollars in picture theatres would 
be secure. 

"During the last year the picture industry 
has been amazed at the dazzling success of 
the Paramount pictures, 'The Covered 
Wagon' and 'The Ten Commandments.' 
While the success of these two pictures is 
truly amazing, on the other hand it is not 
that the organization which turned out the 
best pictures of the industry for twelve 
years, consistently, should climax its record 
with these two achievements. 

"It came as a natural development of or- 
ganization, proving that just as Paramount 
has maintained a supremacy in the week- 
to-week release of motion pictures, so it 
could also achieve the pinnacle of producing 
success in road attractions. 

"The Paramount organization is so 
equipped, so rounded out, that the success 
of its pictures is assured from the moment 
the story is considered until that story 
reaches the screen. The organization is 
back of its pictures all the way through— 
in the selection of stories, the writing of 
scripts, direction, box-office casts, publicity, 
advertising and exploitation. 

"No Paramount picture ever reaches a 
theatre cold. When it goes into an exhib- 
itor's hands, there has already been built up 
an audience of millions of people — people 



who believe implicitly that 'If It's a Para- 
mount Picture It's the Best Show in Town.' 
This belief has been cemented in the public 
mind by years of living up to promises, keep- 
ing faith. 

"In other words, Paramount pictures are 
handled^ from beginning to end by show- 
manship experts; and good pictures handled 
with showmanship are bound to succeed. 

"Now, what of the future? 

"The obligation which has been so bril- 
liantly discharged in the past still exists. 
And it will be even more thoroughly per- 
formed this coming season. 

"There is no promise like past perform- 
ance. 

"At this season of the year the air is full 



DATES OF RELEASE 



Aug:. 4 — "Manhandled." 

Aug. 11— "Wanderer of the Wasteland." 

Aug. 11 — "Changing Husbands." 

Aug. 18 — "Monsieur Beaueaire." 

Aug. 18 — "Unguarded Women/* 

Aug. 25 — "The Enemy Sex/' 

Aug. 25 — "Compromised." 

Septj 1 — "The Mountebank." 

Sept. 8 — "The Covered Wagon." 

Sept. 15 — "The Man Who Fights Alone." 

Sept. 15— "Sinners in Heaven." 

Sept., 22 — "The Alaskan." 

Sept. 22 — "Feet of Clay." 

Sept. 20 — "Open All Night." 

Oet. 6 — "A Woman of Fire." 

Oct. 13 — "Empty Hands." 

Oct. 13 — "The Female." 

Oct. 2©— "Spring Cleaning." 

Oct. 2« — "Wild Moments." 

Oct. 27 — "Forbidden Paradise." 

Oct. 27 — "The Story Without a .Name." 

Nov. 3 — "Merton of the Movies." 

Nov. 10 — "Whispering Men." 

Nov. 17 — "Worldly Goods." 

Nov. 17 — "A Sainted Devil," 

Nov. 24 — "Headlines." 

Nov. 24 — "Argentine Love." 

Dec. 1 — "The Cave of Fallen Angels." 

Dec. H — "The Beautiful Adventuress." 

Dec 15 — "The Coast of Folly." 

Dec. 22 — "Peter Pan." 

Dec. 20 — "The Crimson Alibi." 

Dec. 20^ — "North of 36." 

Jan. 5 — "The Honor of His House." 

Jan. 12 — "Little Miss Bluebeard/' 

Jan. 12 — "Manhattan." 

Jan. 10. — "The Golden Bed." 

Jan. 10 — "Playthings of Fire." 

Jam 26 — "A Woman Scorned." 

Jan. 26 — "A Broadway Butterfly." 



of promises. Loud talking, exaggeration, 
blatant claims — all these cover the picture 
industry like a cloud. 

"But promises should be checked with 
performance. Claims should be analyzed, 
words should be made to square with deeds. 

"And, recognizing this state of affairs, we 
say deliberately and unequivocally that 
never has any single company, in motion 
picture annals, undertaken so ambitious a 
program of screen entertainment. 

"Never before has any company announced 
such a list of titles, stars, directors and casts 
for week-in-and-weck-out release for t he- 
first six months of the new season. The ex- 
hibitors of this country are absolutely as- 
sured of productions of a calibre that will 
establish a new high-water mark in box- 
ofifice success. 

"We cordially invite every exhibitor to 
compare these productions — title by title, 
story by story, cast by cast, director by di- 



rector — with everything else the industry 
offers, and then buy accordingly." 

Included in the list of releases is the 
James Cruze production, "The Covered 
Wagon." This picture has just ended 
a record-breaking run of sixty weeks at the 
Criterion Theatre, New York. 

The list of forty pictures also includes 
"Monsieur Beaueaire," the production which 
will mark the return of Rodolph Valentino 
on the screen after an absence of two years. 
Sidney Olcott directed it. 

"Peter Pan," Barrie's immortal fantasy, 
will at last reach the screen as one of this 
group of pictures. It will be produced by 
Herbert Brenon. 

One of the novelties will be Paramount's 
first picture entirely in color, "Wanderer of 
the Wasteland," a Zane Grey story, which 
has been produced by Irvin Willat in Death 
Valley, Cal. 

Another novelty will be a picture version 
of "Merton of the Movies,'' to be produced 
by James Cruze, the maker of "The Covered 
Wagon,'' with Glenn Hunter in the star role. 

Two of Cecil B. DeMille's productions are 
included. The first of these is "Feet of 
Clay," with Rod La Rocque, Estelle Taylor 
and Victor Varconi. Beulah Marie Dix and 
Bertram Milhauser adapted the screen play 
from the novel by Margaretta Tuttle. Jeanie 
Macpherson will adapt the other produc- 
tion, "The Golden Bed." This is from Wal- 
lace Irwin's novel. 

Three Gloria Swanson pictures on the 
schedule are to be directed by Allan Dwan. 
These are "Manhandled," already completed ; 
"A Woman of Fire" and "The Coast of 
Folly." 

Thomas Meighan has an outstanding place 
in the series. One of his will be James Oli- 
ver Curwood's 'The Alaskan," which Her- 
bert Brenon is to direct. Booth Tarkington 
is writing an original story for him called 
"Whispering Men," which is to be produced 
by Victor Heerman, and he has another, 
"The Honor of His House," by Andrew 
Soutar, to be directed by Victor Fleming. 

Valentino will also have another picture 
in this series, "A Sainted Devil," a screen 
version of a Rex Beach story. Joseph Hen- 
abery will direct. 

The two directors who brought Pola Negri 
her greatest fame abroad are to make the 
three pictures in which she will appear in 
this group. Dimitri Buchowetzki, who di- 
rected her in several of her European suc- 
cesses, will direct her in "Compromised," a 
Suderman story, and in "A Woman Scorned," 
based on the play by Owen Davis and the 
story by Perley Poore Sheehan, "Those Who 
Walk in Darkness.'' Ernest Lubitsch, who 
made Miss Negri's greatest European suc- 
cess, "Passion," will direct her in "Forbid- 
den Paradise." 

Incidental to the release of these forty 
pictures will be the formal introduction of 
three new Paramount stars— Leatrice Joy, 
Richard Dix and William Farnum. Miss 
Joy and Mr. Dix are elevated to stardom as 
a reward for their splendid success in fea- 
tured roles while Mr. Farnum, long a star 
in his own right, returns to Paramount after 
an absence of several years. 



126 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



To Announce Production Plans of 

Vita graph at Chicago Sales Meeting 



ALBERT E. SMITH, president of Vita- 
graph, has called a general sales 
meeting of executives of the organi- 
zation to be held in Chicago early in May. 
This conference will be attended by all di- 
vision managers, exchange managers and 
members of the sales force. 

John B. Rock, general manager, will join 
Mr. Smith in Los Angeles, after a tour of 
exchanges which will include those of the 
West Coast, and go to Chicago for the 
meeting with him. This will be Mr. Rock's 
third swing around the circuit of Vitagraph 
branches. 

This is the first general meeting of the 
Vitagraph organization for several years. 
Mr. Rock has visited the more important 
key cities in the last month where he has 
held subsidiary meetings in advance of the 
main conference. 

The production plans of Vitagraph for 
the coming season include the making of 
some of the biggest and most important 
stories scheduled for picture production In 
the industry. These productions Mr. Smith 
personally is supervising. He has directed 
the preparations for the making of "Captain 
Blood," by Rafael Sabatini, which will be 
produced by David Smith, who will begin 
shooting after he finishes "The Code of the 
Wilderness," upon which he is now work- 
ing. Mr. Smith also has outlined the adapta- 
tion of "The Clean Heart," by A. S. M. 
Hutchinson, which will go into production 
during the summer months. 

At the Chicago sales meeting the produc- 
tion plans as completed by Mr. Smith for 
the season of 1924-25 will be announced. 
There will be twenty-four special super- 
features of the same high calibre as "Cap- 
tain Blood" and "The Clean Heart." 

"The excellence of Mr. Smith's policy of 
big pictures and casts with real box office 
players has been proved in the last year," 
Mr. Rock said in an interview at the Vita- 
graph executive offices last week. "As 
usual, Vitagraph led in the abandonment of 
the so-called star system more than a year 
ago when it began to give to the exhibitor 
story values of real audience satisfying en- 




JOHN B. ROCK 
General Manager of Vitagraph, Inc. 




ALBERT E. SMITH 
President of Vitagraph, Inc. 

tertainment with casts selected for perfec- 
tion of type and abiliity and of known ticket 
selling popularity. The success of such spe- 
cials as 'The Ninety and Nine,' 'Masters of 
Men,' 'Pioneer Trails,' 'The Midnight 
Alarm' and 'The Man from Brodney's' 
proved Mr. Smith's wisdom and far-seeing 
forecast of what the picture-going public 
wants. 

"Our meeting in Chicago will consider mo- 
tion pictures from the exhibitors' point of 
view. I have asked all Vitagraph salesmen 
to submit at that meeting not only the com- 



THE popularity of Mae Murray and the 
efficiency of Metro's sales organiza- 
tion is well illustrated by the great 
number of advance key-city bookings that 
have already been consummated, although 
Metro released this production only a few 
weeks ago. Heading the list is the engage- 
ment of "Mademoiselle Midnight" at the 
Capitol Theatre, Broadway, New York. Fol- 
lowing this it will be shown at the Stanley 
Theatre in Philadelphia, at the State and 
Orpheum in Boston, at Shay's Hippodrome 
in Buffalo and at the Capitol in Detroit. 

Dates have also been set for McVicker's 
in Chicago, the State in Los Angeles, the 
YYarfield in San Francisco, the Strand in 
New Orleans, the Columbia Theatre in Wash- 
ington, the Palace in Dallas, the Howard in 
Atlanta, and the Criterion in Oklahoma City. 

Other big situations that are already set 
are the Allen Theatre in Cleveland, Capitol 
in Cincinnati, Aldine in Pittsburgh, Del 
Monte in St. Louis, Pantages in Kansas City. 
Palace in Memphis, Capitol in St. Paul and 
the Valentine in Toledo. 

The list continues to the New Wisconsin 
Theatre in Milwaukee, Regent in Rochester, 
James in Columbus, Ohio, Colonial in In- 
dianapolis, Dayton in Dayton, Rivoli in Port- 
land, Liberty in Seattle and the Century in 
Baltimore. 



mendations of picture theatre owners for 
the exploitation aids now prepared for them 
but to submit frankly the criticisms of the 
house managers as well. The sales force of 
Vitagraph will direct its efforts toward the 
betterment of relations between exhibitor, 
distributor and producer. 

"Vitagraph for more than a quarter of a 
century has worked continuously for the 
benefit of the exhibitor. It has held to the 
policy that productions are made primarily 
to entertain the patrons of the motion pic- 
ture theatres. It has given to the exhibitor 
its productions at fair rentals and has never 
competed with the theatre owner, as it is a 
producing and releasing organization, and 
not in the exhibition field. 

"The productions contemplated for 1924-25 
will be bigger than ever offered by this com- 
pany in the history of Vitagraph and the 
exhibitors will get the benefit of these 
specials." 

Vitagraph is releasing for summer book- 
ings four specials produced by J. Stuart 
Blackton and David Smith, "Borrowed Hus- 
bands," "Between Friends," "The Code of 
the Wilderness" and "The Strength of De- 
sire," as well as "Virtuous Liars," a Whit- 
man Bennett production, and "One Law for 
the Woman,'' a Charles E. Blaney melo- 
drama. 



Book "Days of '49" 

Patton and McConville of Independent 
Pictures, Inc., Boston, came over to the 
Arrow office last week. W. E. Shallenberger 
screened several chapters of "Days of '49'' 
for them and they booked the series. 




William Duncan in "The Fast Express," a 
Universal chapter play. 



Important Bookings for 

"Mademoiselle Midnight" 



Exhibitors' news and views 

EDITED BY SUMNER SMITH 



Balaban & Katz Combine with 
the Midwest Theatres Circuit 



One of the largest theatrical deals in the 
history of Chicago was put over last week 
with the formation of the Balaban & Katz 
Midwest Theatres, Inc., a Delaware corpora- 
tion. This combination of the Balaban & 
Katz interests and the Midwest Theatres 
Circuit brings nearly fifty theatres under the 
control of the organization. Samuel Katz is 
president of the new organization, which 
will have headquarters in the Butler build- 
ing, across the street from the Chicago The- 
atre. Floyd M. Brockwell, formerly with 
Associated First National, will have entire 
charge of the bookings for the new com- 
pany, and the policy that has been followed 
successfully by Balaban & Katz will be 
continued by the new combination. 

Among the houses included in the deal are 
all the Balaban & Katz theatres, the Chi- 
cago, Tivoli, Riveria, Roosevelt and Central 
Park, and the new house that is now going 
up at Broadway and Lawrence avenue. The 
houses of the Midwest Circuit included in 
the deal are the Rialto, Fox and Strand at 
Aurora; the Castle, Irvin, Majestic and 
Illini at Bloomington ; the Majestic, La 
Petite and Court at Kankakee; the Grove, 
Rialto and Crocker at Elgin ; the DeKalb, 
Princess and Star at DeKalb; the West, 
Plaza, Orpheum and Colonial at Galesburg; 
'the Crystal and Orpheum at Joliet ; the Or- 
pheum, Palm, Midway and Strand at Rock- 
ford; the Avon and Lincoln Square at De- 
catur, all in Illinois; the Majestic, the Rivoli, 
Riveria and LaCrosse at LaCrosse, and the 
Majestic and Wilson at Beloit, Wis. Other 
houses will be added to the circuit from 
time to time and the new organization be- 
gins operations on May 1. 



W. S. Bntterfield, well known manager and 
operator of picture and vaudeville theatres 
across the lake, while in the city last month 
approved the plans for a new million dollar 
theatre for Flint, Mich., and also leased the 
Orpheum at Ft. Wayne for possession next 
season. In the meanwhile the house will be 
given a new stage, seats, scenery and other 
equipments It will be renamed the Capitol 
and placed in the Michigan circuit of Bnt- 
terfield houses. 



C. Bailey has taken over the Lincoln The- 
atre at Valparaiso, Ind., from the Bush man- 
agement. 



John Voumvakis is on his way to Greece 
to spend a few months visiting his old home. 



The Lincoln at Mishawaka has been closed 
and the building will be used for other pur- 
poses. Ed Philion is now in charge of the 
Century in that city and will run every night 
instead of three nights a week. 



C. A. Mendanall has sold the Star at Ore- 
gon, 111., to Berve and Allaban, who operate 
the Majestic at Rochelle and the Pastime at 
Ashton, 111. The new owners will add the Gem 
at Mt. Morris to their circuit this month. 



H. C. Stickelmaier has been made manager 
of the Apollo at Peoria, 111., succeeding 
Thereon Obermeyer, who resigned. 



Reuben Levin, who took over the Audi- 
torium at Indiana Harbor last month, will 



close the house and use the building for 
hotel purposes. 



Rex Lawhead has resigned as manager of 
the Cosmopolitan Theatre and has been suc- 
ceeded by Manager Haag, formerly with the 
Crown Theatre on West Division street. 



Kenneth Fitzpatrick, of Fitzpatrick & Mc- 
Elroy, has bought the lot at the northeast 
corner of Monterey and Homewood avenue 
for an equity of $58,000 from Fred Hoffman. 




Colleen Moore in "The Perfect Flapper," a 
First National picture. 

Construction plans for the site will be an- 
nounced in the near future. 



Four cracksmen failed to open the safe of 
Bert Cortelyou's Victoria Theatre on Shef- 
field avenue, after tying up the janitress and 
using explosives. 



Clark Armentrout, owner of fhe K. P. The- 
atre at Pittsfield, 111., has taken over the 
Star at Barry, 111., from G. M. McClalm, who 
will leave soon for an extended trip to the 
West Coast. Mr. Armentrout will take charge 



on May 1 and book all pictures from Pitta- 
field. 



Mrs. Ruby Heyde has taken over the man- 
agement of the Elks Theatre at Olney, 111. 



Joe Stern and Sam Myers, who recently 
opened the Marquette Theatre on the south- 
west side, have taken a lease on the new 
Fitzpatrick and McElroy house building at 
63rd street and Western avenue, and will 
open the house this fall under the name of 
the Highway Theatre. 



Sullivan and Gray have sold the Rialto at 
Marion, 111., to Louis Maronl. 



The Star at Palmyra, 111., has been taken 
over by W. E. Patterson of Huttick, 111. 



The many friends of W. E. Smith, owner 
of the Colonial Theatre at Clarion, will be 
sorry to hear that he suffered a stroke of 
paralysis recently. The theatre Is now under 
the management of his son. 



Lee W. Arris, formerly manager of the 
Victoria Theatre on 22nd street, has been 
made manager of the Eighth Street Theatre 
recently opened at Wabash avenue and 8th 
street. The house is owned by the Hotel 
LaSalle Interests. 



A petition in bankruptcy has been filed 
against the Alhambra Theatre Corporation 
at Rockford, 111., and the case will be heard 
at an early date by the federal court. 



Herman Schoenstadt sailed last week for 
an extended trip abroad. Mrs. Schoenstadt 
and his sister, Mrs. Adolph Feldman, will ac- 
company him on the trip. 



Cecil Lowande has been made resident 
manager for the Princess and Gem theatreB 
at Beardstown, 111. The houses belong to 
the Wells Amusement Company circuit. 



The Lyric at Monticello, 111., now Is under 
the management of E. E. Gibson. 



The Elite at Waukegan, 111., has Installed 
a new ventilating system. During the sum- 
mer Manager Eddie Trinz will redecorate the 
house and install a new canopy. 



Indiana 

C. C. Cassady has leased the Joy Theatre 
of Cloverdale, Ind., and will remodel it and 
run special attractions, starting with "Pon- 
jola," "Why Worry?" and "The Shooting of 
Dan McGrew." Although the town's popu- 
lation is only 600, he intends to show the 
very best pictures obtainable, regardless of 
expense. Another feature at the Joy will 
be the "Our Gang Comedies." 



Prints in All Exchanges — Now Playing 

GLENN HUNTER 

"GRIT" 

Wtlfl 

Qara Bow. Osgood Perkins. 
Dore Davidson 

dtilm Guild Ptvauctkm 

tUMbuitan HODKINSON 
imr$Si-SSSVmtfhm Run Return 





176 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 




Scenes from "The Fast Express," a Universal chapter play starrin g William Duncan. 



McCloskey's News Reel Makes 
Uniontown, Pa., Take Notice 



C. M. McCloskey, of the State and Perm 
theatres, Uniontown, is making the natives 
sit up and take notice with his little local 
news reel, "The State News Weekly." "Mac" 
installed a complete laboratory at the State 
several months ago and now there is not a 
local event of any importance whatsoever 
that goes unshown on the State screen. The 
graphic example of the value McCloskey has 
found in the little reel is that he sees that it 
comes out regularly once a week, rain or 
shine. 

' The local reel is photographed, developed 
and printed by "Ken" Woodward, Mac's 
publicity man. Many local film men who 
have visited the miniature laboratory have 
pronounced it a marvel of efficiency. 

As an illustration of the interest the little 
reel has created in Uniontown, Mac has sent 
the following clipping from one of his news- 
papers to the World representative : 

"Motion pictures of the Fairchance fire 
were shown at the State Theatre for the 
first evening show, at 7:30 o'clock last eve- 
ning. 'Ken' Woodward, Penn-State news 
reel editor, was on the scene of the fire yes- 
terday morning and returned to Uniontown 
at noon with some 300 feet of fire scenes. 
The film was developed and ready for show 
at the first evening show, quite a commend- 
able bit of work. The fire pictures will be 
shown at the State again today and to- 
morrow." 



have the new house, as yet unnamed, open 
by September 1. The newest addition to the 
New Castle theatres will seat in the neigh- 
borhood of 800 and is being erected on a lot 
50x144 feet in size. 



Received a card this week from Rudolph 
Navary, who has been sojourning in his 
homeland, Italy, for three months. Rudolph 
sends regards to his friends Irnre, and ex- 
pects to return soon. He is the owner of 
the Liberty and Pleasant Hour theatres, 
Verona. 



C. Blake Galbraith, manager of the Colum- 
bia Theatre at Kittanning, was married two 
weeks ago. Congratulations! 

De More and Miller, owners of the Adelphl 
Theatre at Reynoldsville, have purchased the 
only other house in the town, the Liberty, 
from Guy Oglietti. 



Jack Marks, well-known Clarksburg, W. 
Va., exhibitor, was in town recently to do 
some film shopping. 



Kentucky 



W. G. Maute, who has for some time con- 
ducted the Grand Theatre at Irwin, on April 
21 opened his newest house In the same town 
and which he has named the Maute. The 
new house seats 800 and is as pretty a small 
theatre as can be found anywhere** Opening 
night saw capacity crowds anxious to get 
their first glimpse at the new picture house, 
where "Boy of Mine" and an Educational- 
Mermaid comedy were the initial attraction*. 



Easter Sunday in Louisville, accompanied 
by good weather, resulted in packed thea- 
tres, there having been added attractions for 
the theatregoers in the opening of vaude- 
ville with pictures at the Strand Theatre, of 
the Fourth Avenue Amusement Co., and 
Mary Anderson Theatre, of the Keith cir- 
cuit, both of which had been running pic- 
tures heretofore. The Strand, with all new 
seats, a rebuilt first floor, new equipment, 
etc., looks good and is more comfortable. 



The new picture theatre which Dave Bal- 
timore is having erected in New Castle is 
progressing rapidly, and Dave expects to 



M. Switow arranged to sell the two thea- 
tres of the New Albany Amusement Co., 
namely, the Elba, on Vincennes street, and a 
house on Fourth street, at public auction 
on April 25. 



Prints in All Exchanges — Now Playing 



Whitman Bennett Rvsents 



%H00SIER 

schoolmaster: 

featuring 

HENRY HULL «„« JANE THOMAS 



<2>> S friw«i w H0DKINSON 

Season 192H925 Thirty fiis&m Pictures 




Minnesota 

Milaca, Minn., is going to have Sunday 
shows. Ida Merbach, who operates the 
Casino there, aroused the voters and put 
over the issue by 103 votes. 

A merry battle for theatrical supremacy 
is being waged by two exhibitors in Hous- 
ton, Minn., a town of 778 inhabitants. Ker- 
rigan and Forsyth operate the Lyric, 225 
seats, and Foss and Olson have the Opera 
House, which seats 350. Both charge 10 
and 25 cents admission. 



A. N. Johnson, owner of the Gonvlck The- 
atre at Gonvlck, Minn., is planning to pre- 
sent pictures at Oklee, Minn. 



Curtis M. Johnson, brother of H. Bv John- 
son, owner of the Shadow-land Theatre at 
Rush City, Minn., is a candidate for the offlce 
of governor of Minnesota. Mr. Johnson la 
president of the state fair board. 



J. B. Sprague, newspaperman at Middle 
River, Minn., is planning to open a picture 

theatre there. 



J. Bowman has taken over the Savoy at 
New Prague, Minn. The house was formerly 
operated by Lowell Taft. 



Elias Stephens is remodeling a building 
and will open a new theatre at Bemldjl, 
Minn. This will give Bemldji, a resort town, 

four theatres. 



J. E. Hippie, owner of the Bijou Theatre, 
Pierre, S. D., who recently cut prices at his 
theatre to 5 and 10 cents. Is a candidate for 

the offlce of mayor. 



Nebraska 

The town of Crete, Neb., will continue to 
have Sunday picture shows. This is as- 
sured by the defeat the other day at the 
election of the proposed Sunday closing 
ordinance. A. Burn's, manager of the Lyric 
Theatre at Crete, was a fighter in the front 
ranks and is elated over his victory. Not 
many towns in Nebraska have the Sunday 
closing ordinance. 

Theatre owners were holding a convention 
in Omaha on April 29 and 30. C. F~ WUllama, 
president. Issued the call saying that there 
were a great many questions that should 
be brought before the exblbltors. 



S. A. Morgan has sold his Bheatre at Elliot, 
Iowa, to R. E. Star. 



H. Englebart, head of the Jewell Theatre 
at Crescent, la., called on some local ex- 
changes recently. 



E. T. Dunlap, of Hawarden, la., visited 

Omaha recently. 

C. N. Philbrlnk has purchased the Latonla 
Theatre at Williamsburg, Iowa. 



Joyce Mehrems, owner of the Ideal Theatre 
in Omaha, died recently following an opera- 
tion for appendicitis. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



177 




Berinstein Gains Control of 
the Van Curler, Schenectady 



Under a six years' lease for an annual 
consideration of $8,000, the Van Curler Thea- 
tre in Schenectady, last week, passed into 
the control of William Berinstein. This 
gives Mr. Berinstein an entering wedge into 
Schenectady, and adds to the sharp com- 
petition which now exists in that city be- 
tween the Farash Theatres, Inc., a com- 
pany operating three of the largest houses, 
and the Barcli, owned and operated by R. 
V. Erk, of Ilion. Mr. Berinstein's rise in pic- 
ture circles, as an owner, has been little short 
of phenomenal. A few years ago, he was 
the owner of the Colonial and the Hudson 
theatres in Albany, two houses which he 
still retains and which have been consistent 
money makers. As the months have passed. 
Mr. Berinstein has acquired the Palace in 
Troy, the Strand in Newburgh and two 
houses in Elmira. As a little example of Mr. 
Berinstein's proverbial luck, he acquired a 
$200,000 house recently in Corning, which he 
almost immediately sold at a profit of $17,- 
500. George Roberts, of Albany, is general 
manager of the Berinstein circuit. The latest 
addition, the Van Curler, is located in the 
business center of Schenectady, and while 
it is one of the older houses of the city, it 
has always been one of the most popular. 



For the first time in the history of New 
York State, a bowling team from a picture 
theatre is competing in a state tournament. 
Headed by Benjamin Apple, owner of the 
American and King theatres in Troy, the 
American Theatre team is in Syracuse rolling 
with the best pin topplers of the state* The 
team consists of Mr. Apple as captain, Irv- 
ing Rosenberg, Charles Werger, Thomas 
Thorn and William Norton. Troy has been 
the scene of many spirited contests daring 
the past winter between teams from the 
American and the Troy theatres. 



The city of Johnstown will be without a 
picture theatre this summer. C. H. Dopp, 
who owns the Electric, is planning to close 
on June 1 for the summer, with the excep- 
tion of Friday and Saturdays, while the 
Grand also is closing for extensive altera- 
tions. 



The State, Troy and Strand theatres are 
practically set solid in First National pic- 
tures up to July 31. 



The Albany, a second-run house in the Cap- 
itol City, owned by Samuel Suckno, Is go- 
ing to take a chance at week runs. "The 
White Sister" and "Scaramouche" have each 
been booked for six days straight. If Mr. 
Suckno finds that the city will support week 
runs of the larger pictures, he will continue 
at frequent Intervals. 



"I suppose I might just as well give away 
radio sets as door prizes," remarked I*. I,. 
Conners, owner of the Victory in Cambridge, 
Ji. V., while in Albany the other day. Mr. 
Conners complains that radio has cost him a 
great deal of patronage during the past 
winter, and with about 99 out of every 100 
homes equipped with a receiving set, he 
might as well make it a 100 per cent, affair. 



An Innovation in the shape of a soda water 
fountain in the lobby of a picture theatre 
has been planned by A. E. Pearson, of Wln- 
throp, who has just purchased the Lyric In 
Clayton. The whole house is being redeco- 
rated and a new lighting and heating system 
Is being Installed. 



Visitors along Film Row the past week In- 
cluded O. E. Eigen of the Academy In Sharon 
Springs, and that veteran, Charles McCarthy, 
of the New Theatre in Hoosick Falls. 



Morris Silverman, owner of two theatres 
In Schenectady, accompanied by Abe Stone, a 
former owner, was in Ilion one day laat 
week, conferring with R. V. Erk toward clos- 
ing a deal for the Barcli in Schenectady. 



Here's a new one. One day last week, a 
12-year-old girl attending the Troy Theatre 
complained bitterly of a throbbing tooth. 
Benjamin Stern, assistant manager, came to 
the rescue, and using a toothpick and cot- 
ton, applied an application to the aching 
molar with the result that the girl returned 
to her seat and enjoyed the remainder of the 
show. 



The knitting mills in Cohoes are running 
on part time and as the result the world 
does not appear too optimistic to Louis 
Buettner, owner of a couple of theatres In 
that city. - 



Virgil N. Lappeus, manager of the Gris- 
wold in Troy, showed the stuff he is made 
of last week when he remained on duty in 
spite of three operations for abscesses in 
the head. And what is more, the three oper- 
ations, occurring within the week, were per- 
formed without any anaesthetic being ad- 
ministered. Mr. Lappeus admits that on one 
occasion the arm of a chair all but broke 
under his grip. 



D. H. McLaughlin, of Oriskany Falls, was 
in town on one of his periodical visits last 
week. 



Buffalo, N. Y. 

J. H. Michael, chairman of the executive 
committee of the M. P. T. O. of N. Y., Inc., 
and chairman of the exhibitor committee of 
the Film Board of Trade of Buffalo, has 
issued a statement in which he sets forth 
that the exhibitor members of the board in 
the future will refuse to give their time to 
hearing the cases of exhibitors who do not 
affiliate with the state organization. In part 
the statement says: 

"The members of the board representing 
the exhibitors refuse to give their time, ex- 
perience and knowledge for the benefit of those 
exhibitors who do not contribute a penny to 
a state organization. Such exhibitors cannot 
expect the assistance and co-operation of 
men who are putting in from four to six 
hours at each meeting without contributing 
such a small sum as 5 cents per seat a year 
to the state organization which is continu- 
ously working to keep them in business. 

"The men who are engaged in this arbitra- 
tion work should at least be compensated 
by having the rank and file in a state organ- 
ization. When exhibitors get this idea and 
support a state organization 100 per cent., 
then this industry, so far as the exhibitor 
end is concerned, will be In shape to formu- 
late a plan that will be acceptable to all 
states for a real national organization." 



Edgar Weill has returned to the exhibiting 
business. The former manager of the Syra- 
cuse Strand has resigned as an exploitatlon- 
ist for the Metro office to accept the man- 
agement of the Rialto in Glen Falls, N. Y. 



George Beban and his company in person 
and on the screen attracted a vast throng 
to the Lafayette Square the past week to see 
"The Greatest Love of All," the new Beban 
screen vehicle. 



ANTHONY DeWOLFE VEILLER 

Son of the well known author, who is show- 
ing marked ability as manager of the Strand, 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

Canada 

Capt. Frank W. Goodale, manager of 
Loew's Theatre, Ottawa, made a ten-strike 
with a bit of newspaper advertising which 
he used in connection with the arrival in the 
Canadian capital on April 26 of some 500 
employes of the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Company from New York City to establish 
the Canadian headquarters of the company 
in Ottawa. Capt. Goodale used special dis- 
play space in the local newspapers to wel- 
come the newcomers to Ottawa and to point 
out that they would be assured the same 
standard of entertainment which they had 
always enjoyed at the Loew houses in New 
York City. 



The great Pantages Theatre, Toronto, the 
largest theatre in Canada, was the scene of 
an unusual event on Thursday morning, 
April 24, when the finals of the Canadian 
Marbles and Jacks Championship competi- 
tions were played on the stage of the theatre 
before a capacity audience of boys and girls 
under the auspices of the Toronto Daily Star. 
Competitors of youthful age were present 
from many of the leading cities of the Do- 
minion and much enthusiasm was in evi- 
dence. Manager N. K. Miller screened sev- 
eral appropriate comedies as an added fea- 
ture of the program. The Toronto Pantages 
seats 3,700. 



New Hampshire 

A theatre is to be erected in Alton, N. H., 
by the Lynch Brothers. 



J. B. Eames is planning to rebuild; his 
theatre in Littleton. 



Prints in All Exchanges — Now Playing 

■HARRYCAREY, 




AHunt Stromberg 
Production 

DisiribuM by H0DKINS0N, 

Sea»nl92*192ST)urty Fira -Run Pictures 




MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 




Scenes from "The Spitfire," an Associated Exhibitors release. 



Eleven Providence Theatres 
Showed 23 Films Easter Week 



Theatre in Providence, provided Managing 
Director Matthew Reilly with a decided 
novelty musical feature for Easter Week. 
Professor Benedict offered "An Organic Vau- 
deville Show," portraying a variety enter- 
tainment of seven acts. 



An exceptional array of features was 
presented by Providence exhibitors during 
Easter week as follows : Victory, "Girl Shy ;" 
Modern, "Dawn of a Tomorrow" and "Isle 
of Conquest;" Emery, "Pioneer Trails;" 
Emery's Majestic, "Flowing Gold," and "Ex- 
citement;" Emery's Rialto, "Beau Brummel;" 
Fay's, "The Marriage Market;" Strand, "Why 
Men Leave Home" and "Barnum, Jr.;" 
Liberty, "Lucretia Lombard," "Unknown 
Purple," "Ladies to Board," "The Lullaby;" 
Capitol, "Headin' Through," "The Law 
Rustlers," "Eyes of the Forest," "Almost 
Good Man;" Bijou, "My Friend, the Devil," 
"One Clear Call," "Bucking the Barriers;" 
Gaiety, "Backbone," "My Dad." 



"These high class entertainers have pleased 
stay-at-homes for months — now see them in 
person," was the way Mr. Mahoney im- 
pressed his point, advertising the feature 
as "All Star Radio Jubilee Week." 

"The Shepherd King" was the film feature 
for the week. 



"Under the Red Robe" was announced for 
the Strand Theatre in Providence the week 
of April 28 at the usual prices. Clippings 
from Boston papers when the picture was 
shown there used to indicate the differ- 
ence in admission prices — Boston $1.50 — 
Providence 40-cents top. 



Professor Edward Benedict, who recently 
became organist of the Emery-Majestic 



The Broadway Star Corporation will build 
a theatre, store and office building in Provi- 
dence on Broadway. The cost is estimated at 

$100,000. 



Big Fight for Patronage on 
Between Milwaukee Theatres 



That the Rialto Theatre in Providence, 
R. I., has changed hands is denied emphat- 
ically by William J. Mahoney, manager for 
the Emery Brothers, also operators of the 
Emery Majestic Theatre, pictures, and the 
Emery Theatre, vaudeville and pictures, both 
in Providence. Mr. Mahoney has just re- 
turned from New York City, where he con- 
tracted for a large number of pictures. The 
first is to be "Beau Brummel." It was 
shown for the first time in New England at 
the Rialto the week of April 21. 



Exhibitors are asking the question: "How 
can we turn the radio into a means of profit 
for us?" 

William J. Mahoney, manager of the Em- 
ery Brothers' Rialto Theatre in Providence, 
R. I., presented a program during the week 
of April 14 that may be an answer to this 
problem — for him, at least. 

Mr. Mahoney offered six of Providence's 
best known radio stars on the stage of the 
Rialto Theatre. They were from Stations 
WSAD, WJAR and WEAN. Irene Langley 
offered a pianologue; Madeline Casey, so- 
prano; Charles Favail, tenor; Florence 
Thompson, violinist; Artie MacKenzie and 
William Lonergan, ukulele solos and songs, 
were the other entertainers, and Thomas 
Mulgrew, regular announcer, acted in that 
capacity. 



With the Holy Week bugaboo a thing of 
the past and rivalry especially keen because 
of the recent addition of the 3,500-seat Wis- 
consin in the field, every one of Milwaukee's 
downtown exhibitors is presenting a pro- 
gram of unprecedented strength this week in 
an effort to force a showdown. Never be- 
fore in the history of the city have so many 
big pictures been placed before the public 
in a single week, and as a result those in- 
terested in the theatrical situation are watch- 
ing with considerable interest to learn how 
Milwaukee will respond. 

The biggest fight, It Is generally conceded, 
will be between the two largest houses, the 
Wisconsin and the Alhambra, each having 
ontdone Itself in order to obtain the strongest 
program. This battle Is of especial Interest 
In view of the long standing fend between 
the Saxe Interests, In control of the Wis- 
consin, and Leo Aw Landau, director of the 
Alhambra. 

Landau obtained "Three Weeks," despite 
the fact that it originally had been intended 
for Ascher's Merrill. The Wisconsin offers 
Harold Lloyd's "Girl Shy," and in addition 
Strongheart, wonder dog of the movies, 
appears daily on the stage. 



The Merrill is expected to figure heavily 



with "Under The Red Robe" as its feature. 
Roy C. MacMullen, manager of the Merrill, 
is especially fortunate because Hearst's 
newspaper in Milwaukee has been devoting 
columns of free advertising and reading mat- 
ter to this Cosmopolitan photoplay. 



Stan. Brown, manager of Saxe's Strand, Is 
offering "Daughters of Today." The Garden, 
under Landau's direction and the only other 
big first-run downtown house, has Viola 
Dana in "Don't Doubt Tour Husband." 



Crowds that stood for hours outside the 
Capitol Theatre, Milwaukee's latest theatrical 
addition, necessitated three shows on open- 
ing night, April 23, instead of the two 
originally scheduled. The house, seating 800 
and situated in that part of Greater Mil- 
waukee known as West Allis, really had Its 
premiere on the night of April 22, but on 
that occasion only a select audience of in- 
vited guests were present. Clarence Esch- 
enberg is managing the house for Mr. 
Fischer. 



Like father like son. Stanley (Buster) 
Brown, son of Stan. A. Brown, manager of 
Saxe's Strand at Milwaukee, is only 9 years 
old but he's a chip off the old block. When 
his dad showed Wesley Barry in "George 
Washington, Jr.," Buster donned full dress, 
obtained a baton and directed the orchestra 
at each performance. 



Finish New Picture 

Alan Crosland's new production for Para- 
mount, "Unguarded Women," with Bebe 
Daniels and Richard Dix in the featured 
roles, has been completed at the Famous 
Players Long Island studio. The picture, 
which was adapted by James Ashmore 
Creelman from the Saturday Evening Post 
story, "Face," is said to be rich in Oriental 
atmosphere, many of the scenes being laid 
in Pekin, China, and is strong in drama. 

The cast, headed by Miss Daniels and Mr. 
Dix, includes Mary Astor, Walter McGrail, 
Frank Losee, Helen Lindroth, Harry Mes- 
tayer, Donald Hall and Joe King. 



Prints in All Exchanges — Now Playing 




James Kirkwood 

LilaLee and 
Madge Bellamy 

^Presented bijJlegaljPtclures Jnc 

DiMibuitu ut HODKINSON 

W19»-ISG5 Thirty Rm-RunRctuiK 




May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



179 



Sunday Show Problem Faces 
Northampton, Mass., Theatre 



In connection with the recent opening of 
the Goldstein Brothers' new Calvin Theatre 
in Northampton there again has been raised 
the question of Sunday pictures. The city 
owns a theatre, the Academy of Music, where 
pictures are shown. The trustees do not al- 
low Sunday shows in the Academy. One of 
the theatres in the city is open on Sunday, 
but the question has been raised that the 
theatre originally was allowed to open on 
Sundays provided "sacred! pictures" only 
were shown. What the Goldstein Brothers 
intend to do in regard to the Sunday open- 
ing of their new house is problematical at 
this time. It is an understood fact that the 
trustees of the city-owned theatre are out 
thousands of dollars by not allowing the 
house to open Sundays. The Academy, it 
was reported a year ago, had in a year's 
time showed a very small profit considering 
the number of shows presented. 

Easter Week marked the fourth anni- 
versary of the Capitol Theatre in Spring- 
field, which is operated by Abraham Good- 
side of Portland, Me. 



Hen Steinberg and Alex Sarazin, Webster 
film moguls, have been requested to furnish 
lap robes to all persons attending their 
shows. The request is the result of a bob- 
haired girl combing her hair, and heaving 
nearly enough for a mattress on the lap of 
a local news hound. Being a married man, 
he was afraid he would get in "dutch" by 
going home with the hair showing on his 
clothes. Messrs. Steinberg and Sarazin thus 
far have shown no indication of complying 
with the request. 



Fall River ex'hibitors and theatres are to 
be introduced to our readers next week as 
the result of a visit of ye scribe there a few 
days ago. New England exhibitors soon 
will find that the midnight ride of Paul 
Revere was a mere nothing as compared 
with us when we drive up to the managerial 
sanctums in our new flivver just as soon as 
we learn to drive the same. We hereby give 
warning that modesty and bashfulness will 
not be tolerated by us in our search for 
biographies and photographs of ex'hibitors. 
You like to read one about somebody else, 
so naturally somebody else would like to read 
about you and your career and exploits. We 
hereby promise to make no calls on Satur- 
days and on only a mighty few holidays. 



John W. Hawkins, general manager of the 
Allen Theatres, New Bedford, having suc- 
cessfully introduced musical features as added 
attractions on the State Theatre programs, 
has started to present similar features at 
the Capitol Theatre. 



With the coming of "Dorothy Vernon of 
Haddon Hall" into tine Park Theatre in 
Boston Monday night, April 21, the house 
for the first time in several months is with- 
out a Cosmopolitan picture. This company 
had the house on a regulation rental basis 
and took it over for the showing of "Little 
Old New York," followed by "Great White 
Way" and "Under the Red Robe." 

"Girl Shy" came into the Fenway Thea- 
tre, the Paramount house, on April 19, 
getting a holiday opening, as that date is 
observed in the Bay State annually as 
Patriot's Day. Some of the advertisements 
said It was to show for two weeks and 
others merely said "starting today." It was 
expected it would be a second week holdover. 

Although the business for "America" con- 
tinues to be in receipts in the neighborhood 
of $10,000 a week, the advertisements are 
carrying the line "Jast weeks." 

Easter Week also saw the return of "The 
Hunchback of Notre Dame" to Boston — at 
Loow's State Theatre, for the first time In 
the city at popular prices. The picture was 
shown during a rather extended engage- 
ment at the Tremont Temple earlier In the 
season. 



"The Ten Commandments" is moving 
along at about the same pace as "America." 
Its run at the Tremont Theatre shows no sign 
of slackening, at least at the present time. 

"With Allenby In Palestine," a travel pic- 
ture, followed "After Six Days" in the Tre- 
mont Temple. 



A one-story building for a picture thea- 
tre is to be erected in Greenfield by E. 
Edward Benson of that city. 



If Clyde E. McArdle, manager of the 
Somerville Theatre In Somerville, is not 
careful he will find his theatre turned into 
a home for musical comedy talent. If that 
happens, he then may be obliged to take a 
hand himself, for we understand that once, 
and not so very long ago, he had a wonder- 
ful child soprano voice. 



The following Boston theatre men aided 
in arranging the program for the enter- 
tainment given in the Colonial Theatre under 
the auspices of the Menorah Institute, an 
event of considerable importance to the Jew- 
ish community of Boston: Thomas B. Loth- 
ian, Al Sheehan, Robert G. Larsen, George 
Giles, Nathan Gordon, Jacob Lourie, Samuel 
Pinanski, Moe Silver, Victor Morris, James 
Brennan, Si Bunce, Charles Williams and 
Phillip Markell. 



A. J. and F. A. Mann of the Princess Thea- 
tre in Rockville opened their spring and sum- 
mer season with a "bang" Easter week and 
a musical program on their newly installed 
organ was made a noteworthy feature. 



A picture theatre is to be erected on West 
Central street in Natick by M. B. Nazzaro. 



The sum of $150,000 will be expended for 
a theatre, store and office building on 
Essex street in Salem by the Atlantic Thea- 
tre Corporation of Medford. 



Maine 

The Priscilla Theatre in Lewiston will be 
devoted to films after April 26, according to 
D. A. Dostie, manager. A French stock com- 
pany has been playing at the house during 
the past winter. 

The Strand Theatre in Waterville has 
been opened under the direction of Edward 
Jennes. 



According to plans of Dr. A. J. Nile, he will 
build a theatre in Rumford. 



E. J. Sullivan, formerly of Portland, now 
manager of the Orpheum Theatre in St. 
Louis, Mo., is recovering from illness. 



Manager William E. Reeves of Abraham 
Goodside's Strand Theatre in Portland has 
started a new policy of reserving seats In 
the boxes and loges for both matinee and 
evening performances. Three fine pictures 
that Manager Reeves presented one after 
the other are: "The Marriage Circle," 
"Triumph" and "A Boy of Flanders." 



The Calvin Opens 



The new Calvin Theatre in Northamp- 
ton, Mass., home of President Cool id ge, 
the theatre having been named in hit 
honor, was opened on April 17 by Samuel 
and Nathan Goldstein, of the Goldstein 
Brothers Amusement Company, widely 
known theatrical operators of Spring- 
field. Fred P. Belmont is manager of the 
Calvin. 

The receipts of the opening perform- 
ance, $593.55, was turned over to the 
Northampton Community Chest. To this 
sum was added $117, which was realized 
through the auctioning off of the many 
beautiful floral tributes presented the 
Goldstein Brothers. 

Nathan Goldstein welcomed the more 
than 1,800 persons comprising the audi- 
ence. He read congratulatory telegrams 
from many theatrical and picture pro- 
ducers, and a letter from Inspector Ar- 
thur Roach, of the state department of 
public safety, which rated the Calvin 
Theatre as excellent in every particular 
and congratulated the Goldstein Broth- 
ers on the completion of one of the most 
beautiful, modern and safest playhouses 
in the country. 



Connecticut 

The New Haven board of health has an 
"itchy" problem to solve. Several owners 
of film theatres in the city have reported 
that someone with a perverted sense of 
humor has been scattering substances in the 
theatres, causing great annoyance to the 
patrons, usually in the form of an "itch."' 
Powder and obnoxious materials have been 
found producing exhaustive sneezing and 
objectionable odors. 



Bridgeport exhibitors are not to be both- 
ered this summer with the opposition from 
carnivals, as these have been barred by a 
decree of the board of polic commissioner*. 
Applications from six fraternal societies 
were turned down. 



Peter Dawes of Bridgeport. Conn., writes 
as follows: "I am sending you a clipping 
from your April 26 issue in reference to 
Dawes Theatre, Bridgeport, Conn. I want you 
to retract the statement. In the first place, 
Mr. Heanue was not manager of Dawes. I 
always did my own business, both booking 
and financial, and Mr. Heanue was my as- 
sistant in the theatre. The theatre is not go- 
ing to change but will be run by my own 
personal management. Would like to know 
where you got your information and possibly 
if you will let me know I can give you some 
interesting matter for your next issue." 

Norwalk is to have a new theatre. The 
three houses in Norwalk now are reported 
to be faring none too well. Apparently un- 
daunted by present conditions, Joseph Tracey 
announces plans for a new house on Main 
street, strictly for a film policy. 



Prints in All Exchanges — Now Playing 

SAMUEL V. GRAND presents 

BRYANT 
HASH BURN 

with BILLIE DOVE in 




TRY AND 
GET IT* 




HODKINSON 
RELEASE 



Season 1924*1925 
Thirty First-Run Pictures 



MOV I N G PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



California Picture Houses 

Still Affected by Kpidemic 



Cincinnati 



' oiiditioiis in i uliloruia r*sulni.|/ In, in thr 

hool all') moUtll rpi'iiml' UinOllg iXtll* COft- 

Iiihk to glow iiiom »<nous, Willi ipiai aiiline 
regulations be < oiiimg moie stringent. 'J lir 
di*eu«e in confined lo a few countiea but 
many otheri novo pLwod pfohlW.lvo regulu 
Mom on travel and on the int#rchs0ga ©1 

Lin/, piodu< Is, Willi lli"' M snll Hut huswrss 
In (MMftl 1 1 l/« iii|/ icrioukly affected. In 
llir COUnf i< s wli< m i|k <]/,')< mi- is prevalent 
faillMIS ul- l/< lug ..<) vjs« <J to I'lllalll ill llOllle 

and ilu.iir«# are doing but a light butiries*. 
J'llm salesmen lovenng die territory are 
obliged lo submit to dismfi < ting pio<e**r« 
at county I in*-* and are finding »oinr roads 
ClOted to all travel. Inhibitor* are not 
■ omiiig lo Sun l/ruixis'o lo make bookings 
a* foimeily, and visiiois on 1'ilin Row have 
been few and (ai l/ilwern llie IjsI frw week*. 
' onvriilioiis in many plu< cs air being post- 
poned and mux < i ssai y gathering* in ibe 
mindly dlftl 1 1< I s .n< I,, i.j/ downed upon ll 
in not beln-vid ili.it ili< Mtiiali</n will List 
long, but heavy loss< 6 air now being in- 

(uri f\ 



•ru« aMMf r »« of win Hraki, «r iba 

II* Hi li ll I Ml* |i A (#1 I, a • III* II I < ll . Ill ■ b * I* * , I Ml., 
•♦Ill li« glad Iii bunt* Hint In la Miiilirilug 

fa|lllll> I I ll * il|li lilllmi fill H|i|/i mill lll« ll* 

■ * • • ll 1 1 > II ll ll • ■ %» • III 

l.lu «»i« ii r«j j <i & L*vln huva opanad th* 
Urauadu Thealn ul Moiguu mil, i;»|. 'J'ba 
hnuua aualu about 4"'i' 

Ml' haul* & Molilaii In, vi lukun </v«i III" 

blni oln 1 1 ra, Han It . am !«• o 

I I it nagat of i im cumuo 'J'bau- 

tra, Hun Prnnoiauo, ia making a*uaiiani nan 

»r Mm double *n»i'i*« "f an adjoining 1 «n Ml 

»! , InataillllM •llaidn >u In kua|ilna will) tliu 

wuuii 'm ii i i i ii i i ion, 



't'Um i Man naay, pwmrr „/ i u * 

Uraauanl Tbaulra, nun ii'riiiiaiavu, la bavin* 

■liana drawn f,,i ,i I Ii ■ a I • • ..III, MOO •aula III 

*•» • » • i I • il .... I ii i !■ I ... i i. . ,. i It i hi ii | 

'I'bi bona* tvlll I,, nl 1 1 1 I I ii i • III I • i I n ■ ■ i.iiil 

••III MMH nl ailHI.IMKI 

Tk( Qolleeum Thaalra, Ran I' mm ia. .,, iiaa 

put nil JO Mendel a l'.|, llui, it of leu pluytiia 
f|M Quldan Htula 'lliaulia & Kuully Oo„ 

ton franulauo, ia having nUna prat <t tni 

<• III' Urn In. inn i 1 1 I ul Muntuiay, 

Ori 



llui Pain Aiiu Tha«tr« Company, nr n'blnn 

IDIIIo Ailtnali la inuiiuiiur, la Imvlna nlaim 

|n "I In! Iliu • mini luitlun ii f u |lil,000 

I H ■ li'iuau ul I'ttlg All. i, l ul 



Colli run I a ttia li<iln H uwm.li.i i,y I, H 
TnnTnlmlai * Hnna fni tin uunalruutlon of « 
pli i in i, 1 1 . i a 1 1 1 , a i Uimbu rat, I ■ i 



«,'B.rJ J<iM-nta<li l.im i«l"ii a nlnaiy ulna 
aar Jajiae 'in yi '.pti i y al OkMRfRf w »y »"<J 
al<Ki u«». nvaiiue, lixtkoliy, '.'at, nn4 plana 

< .M' U'/i. .,f I. i/l'iura iliaatra to coat 



Si. Louta 



'O. in' iwi.iy Mil. aiiinvrisaiy of tb« 

frrsnd ma*i mealing in the old Munfc Hall. 
St. Louie, at which $1,008,170 wa* tubtcribed 
towtrd MCtiriRf tbe J^uisiaua 1'urcbaac 
Woild's )'.>|;osiiioii foi St, Jyinii, llinlrcn 
</l thi oni/iiial world'* fair committee U(h 
eird at j< II' i son Mrin./iial in Pored I'arlc 
Ofl A|/nl ZJ to anejii for tlie Missouri Ui*- 
i'/ii' .il '.',' i< ty .. i/j<,viiig j/ii inn 1 1 . i>rd '/I llie 

;•.•.,> . ,1.1,1, '/In |,i' I hi < .-. w I ' .ii I aiij/'d 

l/y William Goldman, own' i matiagei of llie 
Kings TtHMtrR, St. Louis, and llie gilt v.as 
niadi |/'/5Sil/|i llnoiigli Ins ' (loils 'I lie 
j/i'iiire* were taken RDORl >wo year* ago 
wli' ii '/'/I'lm.in was m i, .. ;/< i >.l llir Missoiill 
rheitri tlld R'Rfl fhoWSRl 'bat tbeatre. 'I be 
fill ./j/'ii«.| ofl May I, \'M ( tl tin i/ii)/in a | 

commute* of ninety tnrcu promioMf tiii/i-ns 

bill twenty ciglit siiiviv 



'I'ba NalruiiulllaH 'I baalr* OnfpWO tl— , ..in, 

Rital "' RMRaWR, ku> n«M laaarpnrntaR 

In Ml I nula II la lu* MNHyoay mail ••III bulla 
Willi,.,.. i.i.i.Ii.iiiii • ,.,„ hi. , I ■■•■Ira, 

(/infill Imiili *u,i| mill ftln»M"ii alraal, «'oaj 

aliiiilli.ii »»Mlili liua ulirail *• I 

ll.. In. .. i ii I. .la a Ii. I lln I, llal*d l...l.ll..a> 

arai llutld luwaMn, l,1tUt abar«a| 10. M. 
RfVtMMi I avail abar*a| I.. Aibr>N»aa, IU4I 

abulia, HJ A l'lililln«i|i, Km ..I. ...... R|M 

M a p tor, laWR abm.ai ||fj l,**>la, / .«, aharaa, 
■•ml I ii in In, I I',. Wnllbar, I abara. 

ftlM MltM "t Naw Muililil, Mi/, i/l ana (0 
•mo) i> t,0f0 auut tliautra In that city to uoat 

iiliwunla of ||0,9OfJ 

A .In in (ialn ln |,ua itm i liaaatl tba Lf/flO) 
I 1 1 1. it 1 1 1. , fin Jlol/ij) y. M„ (mm It M. Mli«ll.,ii 

LPRll Milium In OpnrfttlM "'• Itnland 'I'baa- 

li a ul Mm I'. ii. III 

Tliainlure I'. Iiuvla liua ra-otianad Ilia 
PDHPtH Mliaul TbMltrn, Muliarly, M<j. 



Hull Ifoiaaritil'l i/luno I., upan an alrm/nia 
In Ml. OlaVlf, Mo, aurly In May. 



I'.tlillillora Ht.ui, uloiiK I'l'loia How alina 

Uk. i, in oonvantlon Inoludadi Uraan i.uitraii, 

fai kaonvllla, Hl.| O <• J..n«.a, Ainailian, i.'am- 
brla, Hi . I. U Vuii'Hva,, Rtar, Kannalli, Mo ; 

• iiia Kllovonfun, Opera Houaa, Naw Atbana, 
111 I ll Hui m a, Opera liouau, Montgomery 
' ii /. Mo, I 'I A Mi ' i/i inn I., l.yuaiim, I'onlar 
Uluff, Mo; li W iliiMliua, Nuw lluvon, Mo., 

II • ' 1 UttlR, J'ualoM", Mo. 



Prints in All Kxchangea Now Playing 



Wbal is a motion joctu 

llOII liial iht (>lno '.Ulllr 
luiiil/us, Oluo, lias be«n t. 
cide in the catc of it V, , 
Ohio, exhibitor. It i» recoi 
book, ai J'indUy Hut liro 
thu* U 
fa all 



wlii< Ii j/iolnbil a 
formante uj/on tl 
however, tontMi'l 
neither a lliralr 
foinuin e, 



it the quea- 
^url at Co- 
upon lo.de- 
ird*. J .i 'Hay, 
in the statute 
Kii dards hM 
n forty timet 
>lno blur liiwi, 



iirn.al or dramatic per 
abbath day. Kicbardl, 
at a motion pnlure ia 
nor a dramatic per- 
dmgly BM '«»<-, which 



boil tttrMttd n/idefpreu IttRBtiORa ha* been 
aij/i"! iii rvery 'ouit, linally rea<liing the 
I/iinm-iiii (,'ourt, wlirii- ii is now in progrea*. 
HI'liai'ta la i a|/i •aanlad l/y ul/la counaaL 
Moiaovar, JTratl Ikh.u., who la maiianlng 
'Hi. '", i of l>/«w a >>blo 'Miaatraa, ami who 
la a filaiiO or J i j 'la; a Jonaa of tba Uuuimm* 
beneb. baa np p enrao i/*f'/»a tkRl iiii/unui tul 

a*|/lulna1 in datall |uat liow a movln*. pla- 
loia la oiiaralad Mai Joat wliy aucb an an- 
tortaVlRflSMl loca Ml BORM wltliln tba RRlR* 
K'.i/ |R 'loeailoii 

'I i/ ..oo foal to tlia Hra, alalaan cliurcban, 
tbrougb tbelr runraaentatlva, Ilia Allied 
ObUrObee or Olilo, nrcaantad a, la'iuaat to 
Ilia "/oil nfOrlSR l '<at all ulctura at 0 MOO Id 
'/iiio M R M a p tlblO to RlMO M SonOay. 

(Joiicurraolly wiio tba reduetleR In adrnln- 
alon i/il'iea ul 'ilfia 'Ibaulia. 1 I in. I una 1 1, 
Mui.aue, Juice fiunkal baa diaaacl Iiia lobby 
to I'wuuii a Mini AMI nuidan 

Irvln BUI— i oiunu««i or tl.*. I'lana 'Ilia*- 
Ira, Not wood, 'Oil'/, la inoui nlRR (§0 "•«" of 
Iiia foil. • i, iiamy Hilton, wlio |/uaaad away 
uftar a two waaka' BlRRM 

William Jamaa, m *al<l> nl or llie Jamaa 
'Jlmuli a < o, i.'i/Hiinbua, 'llilo, annouBeRR tlukt 

foui naw bounen will n« built in I bat city 
M Waal llioud alruat, tjllnloiivllla, Kaat 
1/lvliiMaton ami Nooili I'uiaona avanoea ra- 
aiiavtlvely. 



Seattle 



Si Ij.hi/, l/ii/iliri of John lJ.ni/, who own* 
.■ • in ml ol ilii all' s down town, Seattle, hai 
jii-i ai lived in Srattlr aflu an absence of 
S'vi.il yaia Ml. lJ.ni/ was "1/rrallllg ■ 

pli inn Boiioi in Astoiia, Oregon, und wa* 
winrd out bv tin big (in ilierr. lie then 
wiiii lo Oakland, wbrir In I, ought a hou*R. 
lie < all ol the Noilbwest < '.iilinued lo grow* 

howovor, so be a i / 1 . i tin- Oak hind houoo and 

headnd nOfthi He is visiting relative* In 
Srallle, and wlnlr ll is alii n ipa Ird lie will 
again loiuli Inir, has nia'l. no drfimte an- 
iioiiiii • uk nl ol bis plans 



I bMili a l.uula, **rll -b no •• ■■ I blnraa »*f* 
llallal, la about lu «!•« Raullla a raal I klaaaa 

pfnfBM Ibaulra, ll <»lll lla a brtrb 1 1 *, . 

mi u 110 by IRIti'fOOl lot ul AM Ua»»alb araaaa* 

amiib, and Iruui ..ii ..ill aburr 

I blnraa uli lutra and tin a(|ul|#urd In Iba Irut 
l blnraa afyla. 



II M hi' l"i la iilumiliiu roiiati u'll'in of 

pli i in . i in, ai i u in Taeoma 



Mill, inn li on woi I liy'a Idaho Tliautra, Mm 
l ow, Hullo, liua linau < loaad. Ml Kanworlby 

operatRi iii« rnmnlnlno timuiiu tiiara, 

Pat a Rlrupplar'a Ml/nrty, Pullman, WMb.. 
I.. .a In no rloai.il, luuvllia but oiia bouaa op* 
"111111111 llialu, will' Ii alao la ownad by Mr. 

Uli UpplRf, 

'i I TRrbuna, or tba Aroade, Walla Walla. 
vVaah., nnnoumiua iim imokinn of n auiid 

nili of Wuimi Hioibara pluluraa. lla 

./(>« ii ail Hila aiiaolul Hat with "Wbara Iba 

i Hi Manilla," Inaablnn "11 It la bouaa 

ra lu I'luylna; aplll waab iHonrania, be 

will allow ulnlit illiunaua. 




STRATGHTfrom €e SHOULDER REPOSE 

A Department for. The Information of exhibiToju 

EDITED BY A. VAN BUREN POWELL 



Associated Exhibitors 

COURTSHIP OF MYLES STANDISH. (9 

reels). Star, Charles Ray. To lovers of 
American history and Longfellow adherents 
it will be appealing', but audiences partial to 
romance and action will walk out on It. 
Moral tone very good and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Had very good business. Draw bet- 
ter class. Admission 10-25-33. J. L Stallman, 
Logan Theatre (2,500 seats), Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

GOING UP. (5,886 feet). Star, Douglas 
MacLean. Very good comedy drama and 
gave my patrons lots of laughs. Attendance 
satisfactory. Draw agricultural class. C. A. 
SWierclnsky, Majestic Theatre (250 seats), 
Washington, Kansas. 

MIRACLE MAKERS. (5,834 feet). Star, 
Leah Baird. A good feature for Its kind 
with quite a bit of action. Lots of every- 
thing. All the cast are good and do good 
acting. Suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. G. M. Bertling, Favorite Theatre 
(187 seats), Piqua, Ohio. 

TEA WITH A KICK. (5,950 feet). Star 
cast. A very pleasing audience picture, 
much comedy. Better watch your paper on 
this one, where have censor board. Moral 
tone fair, but It is not suitable for Sunday. 
Attendance, 200. T. W. Young, Frances The- 
atre, Dyersburg, Tennessee. 

UP IN THE AIR ABOUT MARY. (5 reels). 
Star, Louise Lorraine. Not much for story, 
but a humdinger for legshow and comical 
situations, moves along entire length. Lively 
and light, action good. Keys them on the 
giggle, winding up witha blinky honey-moon. 
If you've got it coming you have nothing 
to dread. Moral tone okay and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
oil and farm class in town of 508. J. A. Her- 
ring, Play House Theatre (249 seats), Strong. 
Arkansas. 

F. B. O. 

BISHOP OF THE OZARKS. (4,852 feet). 
Star cast. A pretty good picture, our audi- 
ence said. Ran it on Saturday night. Moral 
tone fair, but it is not suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw small town and 
country class in town of 800. Admission 10- 
25. A. Kenss, Community Theatre (499 
seats), New Athens, Illinois. 

FASHIONABLE FAKERS. Star, Johnny 
Walker. This was only fair program pic- 
ture. All right for big town. Small towns, 
no. Had poor attendance. Draw general 
class in town of 2,208. Admission 10-25. J. 
W. Griffin, Scotland Theatre (500 seats), 
Laurinburg, North Carolina. 

HUMAN WRECKAGE. (7,215 feet). Star, 
Mrs. Wallace Reld. Get fooled on this picture. 
Did not draw for me. ' Personally liked it. 
Great for any theatre, but they simply stayed 
away. On asking them why they all said no; 
too horrible; don't want to see that kind of 
picture. Ran two days. Was certainly sur- 
prised on not doing any more business, as 
everybody here was wild over Wally Reid. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Attendance off. Admission 15-35. W. 
H. Odom, Pastime Theatre, Sandersville, 
Georgia. 

HUMAN WRECKAGE. (7,215 feet). Star, 
Mrs. Wallace Reid. This Is no doubt an ex- 
cellent picture, but fellow exhibitors, don't 
pay more than program prices for It; It 
simply fell flat here the second night. It 
doesn't draw. Has good moral tone, suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
town and country class, town of 500. Admis- 
sion 10-25. A. F. Schreiver, Oneida Theatre 
(225 seats), Oneida, South Dakota. 

IF I WERE QUEEN. (5,955 feet). Star, 
Ethel Clayton. After reading Straight F) om 



These dependable tips come from ex- 
hibitors who tell the truth about pic- 
tures to help you book your program 
intelligently. "It is my utmost desire to 
serve my fellow man," is their motto. 

Use the tips; follow the advice of ex- 
hibitors who agree with your experience 
on pictures you both have run. 

Send tips to help others. This is your 
department, run for you and maintained 
by your good-will. 

A monthly Index of reports appears 
in the last issue of each month, cumula- 
tive from January to June and from 
July to December. 



the Shoulder reports on this one I let the 
F. B. O. salesman put one over on me when 
I booked this one. Six reels of nothing. This 
will not go in a small town where your pa- 
trons like action pictures. My advice is stay 
off this one. Had fair attendance. Used 
ones. Not suitable for Sunday or any other 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw coal min- 
ers. Admission 15-25. C. M. Hale, Big Sandy 
Theatre, Big Sandy, West Virginia. 

ITCHING PALMS. (6,000 feet). Star cast. 
Good comedy drama. If you like comedy 
dramas yon can not go wrong in buying this 
picture. Will please majority. Moral tone 
good. Had good attendance. Draw rural and 
city class in town of 1,300. Admission 10-20. 
A. Kenss, Community Theatre (500 seats), 
New Athens, Illinois. 

JUDGMENT OF THE STORM. (6,329 feet). 
Star cast. Here is one really and truly big 
picture. We put this over in big style and 
did big business on it. A wonderful picture 
that has everything any audience wants. 
Play this up big. Moral tone excellent and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had big attend- 
ance. Draw suburban class in city of 77,000. 
Admission 10-20. William A. Leucha, Savoy 
Theatre (475 seats), St. Joseph, Missouri. 

JUDGMENT OF THE STORM. (6,329 feet). 
Star cast. Fine picture. Acting of Hacka- 
thorne excellent. Should make money where 
outdoor pictures are liked. Moral tone good. 
Matlock Theatres, Pendleton, Oregon. 

KEEPING UP WITH SOCIETY. (5 reels). 
Star cast. Too long, should of been two 
reels. Would not advise you to pay much 
for it. Moral tone bad but it is not suitable 
for Sunday. Draw city and country class in 
town of 3,500. Admission 10-20. G. A. Peter- 
son Lyric Theatre (250 seats), Sayre, Okla- 
homa. 



LOVE PIRATE. (4.900 feet). Star, Carmel 
Myers. This is a very good picture. Print In 
good shape. God for small town service. At- 
tendance good. Draw all classes In town of 
900. Admission 10-20. W. C. Herndon, Lib- 
erty Theatre (250 seats), Valliant, Okla- 
homa. 

LOVE PIRATE. (4.900 feet). Star, Carmel 
Myers. A fair program picture. Seemed to 
please. Had good attendance. Draw small 
town and country class in town of 2,000. 
Admission 10-25. Wallis Brothers, Isis The- 
atre (250 seats), Russell, Kansas. 

MAILMAN. (7,160 feet). Star, Ralph 
Lewis. This one went over with a bang. 
Frankly a machine-made melodrama and 
without any pretentions. People just ate It 
up. It's apparently a picture for the masses, 
especially in the smaller towns. City of 
110,000. Admission 10-20. Al. C. Werner, 
Royal Theatre (500 seats), Reading, Penn- 
sylvania. 

MAILMAN (7,160 feet). Star cast. Good 
story, well liked. Plenty of old hoakum 
thrills that will make them stand up and 
shout. Played it four days to big business. 
Good moral tone, suitable for Sunday. Big 
attendance of mixed class in city of 36,000. 
Admission 25-35. C. D. Buss, Strand Theatre 
(700 seats), Easton, Pennsylvania. 

MAILMAN. (7,160 feet). Star cast. 
Pleased one hundred percent. Can't go 
wrong on this one. Moral tone good and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Draw city and coun- 
try class, in town of 3,600. Admission 10-20. 
G. A. Peterson, Lyric Theatre (250 seats), 
Sayre, Oklahoma. 

MAILMAN. 7,160 feet). Star cast. This 
Is a real picture. Pleased everyone. It is 
as clean as a hound's tooth and every ex- 
hibitor is perfectly safe in boosting this 
one big. The naval scenes are wonderful. 
The picture has thrills, comedy and pathos 
agreeably blended. Moral tone good and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw rural class In town of 200. Admis- 
sion 10-25. D. B. Rankin, Co-operative The- 
atre (200 seats), Idana, Kansas. 

MY DAD. (5,600 feet). Star, Johnny 
Walker. Pleased ninety percent. An old 
one, but a good one. Walker always draws. 
A northern. Moral tone okay and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw rural and small town class in town 
of 286. Admission 10-25. R. K. Russell, 
Legion Theatre (136 seats), Cushlng, Iowa. 

First National 

AGE OF DESIRE. Star, Vera Stedman. 
Just a good program picture. Average bet. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw small town 



Released April 20, 1924— Now Booking 



WANDERING HUSBANDS 

James Mrkwood 



andLilalee 

!■ * " I MARGARET LIVINGSTON 

'» : Prritn:*i Ay RCGAL PICTURES INC. 

for HODKINSON RELEASE 

\ s Snw 19W-I925 Tmrly First-Bun PictuiM 



182 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



and country class in town of 2,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25. Wallis Brothers, Isls Theatre 
(250 seats), Russell, Kansas. 

ANNA CHRISTIE. (7,631 feet). Star, 
Blanche Sweet. Just fair. My people thought 
it was pretty rough. Moral tone not so good 
and it is jiot suitable for Sunday. Had poor 
attendance. Draw all classes In city of 
15,000. Admission 35. S. A. Hayman, Lyda 
Theatre (360 seats), Grand Island, Nebraska. 

ASHES OP VENGEANCE. (10 reels). Star, 

Norma Talmadge. A very fine picture, well 
acted. Deserves good houses. Moral tone 
good, but It is not suitable for Sunday. At- 
tendance 385. Draw white class In town of 
4,000. Admission 10-15-20-40. Orpheum The- 
atre (400 seats), Oxford, North Carolina. 

ASHES OF VENGEANCE. (10 reels). Star, 

Norma Talmadge. Costume play, but went 
over big for me. Moral tone good and it Is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw all classes in city of 15,000. Admission 
35. S. A. Hayman, Lyda Theatre (360 seats). 
Grand Island, Nebraska. 

BAD MAN. (6,404 feet). Star, Holbrook 
Blinn. Good picture, clever work all around. 
Didn't do very big with us on account of 
patrons not liking Westerns too well, and 
that came in the Western class with us. 
Moral tone fair, but it is not suitable for 
Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw neigh- 
borhood class in city of 65,000. Admission 
10-20. S. H. Borisky, American Theatre, 
Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

BAD MAN. (6,404 feet). Star, Holbrook 
Blinn. We consider it a rather different pro- 
gram picture. Pleased majority. Had good 
attendance. Draw small town and country 
class in town of 2,000. Admission 10-25. 
Wallace Brothers, Isis Theatre (250 seats), 
Russell, Kansas. 

BELL BOY 13. (3,940 feet). Star Douglas 

MacLean. Very light stuff and too short. 
People don't enjoy this. Had an "Our Gang" 
to pull it through. Moral tone okay and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw town and country class in town 
of 1,200. Admission 10-25. Cecil R. Seff, New 
Radio Theatre (248 seats), Correctionville, 
Iowa. 

BLACK OXEN. (7,937 feet). Star, Corlnne 
Griffith. Excellent box office attraction. Held 
up three days. Moral tone good and It Is 
suitable for Sunday. Had excellent attend- 
ance. Draw high class in city of 18,000. Ad- 
mission 10-25. J. T. Bangert, Orpheum The- 
atre (1,080 seats), Okmulgee, Oklahoma. 

BOND BOY. (6,902 feet). Star, Richard 
Barthelmess. Just the kind of play that my 
audience likes to see Dick in. Moral tone 
okay and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Draw common everyday Ameri- 
cans in town of 1,800. Admission 10-30. R. 
Keehn, Keehn Theatre (250 seats), Lebanon, 
Oragon. 

BOY OF MINE. (7 reels). Star, Ben Alex- 
ander. One of the best pictures I have ever 
played. It has all the good qualities a pic- 
ture needs and then some. Full of comedy 
and heart interest. Can be bought right. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw all classes 
in town of 1,500. Admission 10-30, 20-40 on 
specials. F. E. Whitney, Albany Theatre 
(250 seats), Albany, Texas. 



Between Ourselves 



A get-together place where 
we can talk things over 



Stealing Hal Roach's stuff, 
maybe — Hedberg, in his letter on 
the next page — when he calls our 
good old crowd "Our Gang" — but 
it's a forgivable "swipe" and cer- 
tainly there couldn't be a more 
affectionate term found. 

Hal's proud of his "Gang" and 
I'm just as proud of "our'n." 

Conscientious — sincere — but 
you've read the tips and you know 
the boys or else you're one of 
them and saying to yourself — 
"shut up!" 

More pages! Yes — we're get- 
ting them and using them to give 
you more reports on. As Hedberg 
says, they are better than others, 
because our "Gang" takes a vital 
interest in building them up. 

I've had to ignore some sugges- 
tions — limerick contests, popu- 
larity ballots, and others — because 
I believe that what you want here 
is what this department is dedi- 
cated to giving — STRAIGHT 
FROM THE SHOULDER RE- 
PORTS. 

And as long as our "Gang" keeps 
on sending 'em, I'll get the space 
to print 'em. — VAN. 



CAVE GIRL. (4,405 feet). Star cast. A 
very satisfactory picture. Pleased a hundred 
per cent. Attendance poor, but owing to 
coal mines closing down. Moral tone O. K. 
O. K. for Sunday. Draw miners and factory 
people, town of 900. Admission 10-25. Lee 
Dillingham, Kozy Theatre (250 seats), Nor- 
tonville, Kentucky. 

CHILD THOU GAVEST ME. (6,191 feet). 
Star cast. Fine show throughout. Good act- 
ing done both by Baby Hedrlck and dog Is 
what my patrons tell me. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw railroad class In town of 
805. Admission 15-25. G. W. Hughes. Hughes 
Theatre (150 seats), New Haven, Missouri. 

DADDY. (5,738 feet). Star, Jackie Coogan. 
An honest to goodness picture, one that 
pleosed young and old. Mostly pathos, but 
it has enough comedy mixed in to relieve it. 
Moral tone good and It is suitable for Sun- 
day. Draw small town class In town of 



1,600. W. T. Waugh, Empress Theatre, 

Grundy Center, Iowa. 

DADDY LONG LEGS. Star, Mary Plckford. 
This has been rated as one of the five best 
pictures ever made. It must be so. Moral 
tone good and it Is suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Mitchell Conery, 
I. O. F. Hall (225 seats), Green Island, New 
Tork. 

DANGEROUS MAID. (7,337 feet). Star, 
Constance Talmadge. A fair costume pic- 
ture, but this type flopped for me. Had 
booked for two days, but only used It one. 
Moral tone not bad and It is suitable for 
Sunday. Attendance 150. T. W. Young, 
Frances Theatre, Dyersburg, Tennessee. 

ETERNAL CITY. (7,800 feet). Star cast. 
As a whole good. Some beautiful shots in 
this. But story rather Jumpy and rather 
deep for town of this size. Not making 
much of a hit. Moral tone good and It is 
suitable for Sunday. Had pood attendance. 
Draw all classes in city of 65,000. Admission 
10-25-35-50. H. W. Irons, Franklin Theatre 
(1,600 seats), Saginaw, Michigan. 

ETERNAL FLAME. (7,453 feet). Star, 
Norma Talmadge. Good in spite of being a 
foreign atmosphere. Went over well and 
was well attended. Wonderful acting. 
Hardly suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw small town and country 
class in town of 800. Admission 10-26. 
Welty & Son, Mid-Way Theatre (499 seats). 
Hill City, Kansas. 

FIGHTING BLADE. (8,729 feet). Star, 
Richard Barthelmess. Good star and good 
story, but why so many costume and period 
pictures? Like all good stars he didn't go 
over with us on account of the costumes. 
Hope they are through making them. Moral 
tone okay and ti is suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw neighborhood class 
In city of 65,000. Admission 10-20. S. H. 
Borisky, American Theatre, Chattanooga, 
Tennessee. 

FLAMING YOUTH.. (4,434 feet). Star, 
Colleen Moore. A well produced picture 
photoplay; any picture show will do well to 
show this picture. We had full house and 
well spoken of. Moral tone good, but It Is 
not suitable for Sunday. Attendance, 400. 
Draw white class in town of 4,000. Admis- 
sion 10-15-20-40. Orpheum Theatre (400 
seats), Oxford, North Carolina. 

FLAMING YOUTH. (8,434 feet). Star. 
Colleen Moore. Every exhibitor should play 
this one. Why? Because it will make you 
more money than ninety per cent, of the 
select from the entire field and because It Is 
first rate entertainment and the only ones 
that will be disappointed will be those who 
come and expect more than could have 
passed the National Censorship Board. I 
had twelve local ladies censor the picture 
and advertised same. They passed on it and 
I broke my house record. Moral tone fair, 
but it is not suitable for Sunday. Draw 
farmers in town of 2,000. Admission 10-36. 
P. A. Preddy, Elaine Theatre (374 seats), 
Sinton, Texas. 

GIRL OF THE GOLDEN WEST. (6,600 

feet). Star cast. Food western of the '49 
period. Cost twice what it was worth. Moral 
tone okay, but it is not suitable for Sunday. 
Had poor attendance. Draw small town class 
in town of 1,269. Admission 10-25, 25-35. 
S. G. Harsh, Princess Theatre (249 seats), 
Mapleton, Iowa. 

GOOD REFERENCES. (5,000 feet). Star, 
Constance Talmadge. This is as good as the 
average, but the star always take well here. 
Moral tone good and it Is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw farming 
class in town of 350. Admission 20-35. C. 
W. Mills, Outlook Theatre (200 seats), Out- 
look, Montana. 

HER REPUTATION. (7 reels). Star, May 
McAvoy. Pretty good. Well liked. May Is 
sure some good looking sweetie. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw all classes In city of 
15,000. Admission thirty-five cents. S. A. 
Hayman, Lyda Theatre (360 seats), Grand 
Island, Nebraska. 

HER TEMPORARY HUSBAND. (6,723 
feet). Star, Owen Moore. Best comedy we 
have run. The audience will roar. Good 
business. Moral tone good. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw high class in city of 18,000. 



Released April 27, 1924— Now Booking 

1ETTYC0MPS0N 
MIAMI 




<Jn Alan CwslondAvchicfick 

■Produced hy OilforJ Cinema Corp. 

fa- HODKINSON RELEASE 
Season 1024-1025 Thirty fct-RonPk-turea 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



183 



Admission 10-25. J. T. Bangert, Orpheum 
Theatre (1,080 seats), Okmulgee, Oklahoma. 

HER TEMPORARY HUSBAND. (6,723 
feet). Star, Owen Moore. A farce comedy 
that is positively funny. Continuous rapid 
fire action that makes the audience howl 
with delight. Should be advertised as a 
guaranteed laugh producer. Moral tone okay 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw mixed class. Admission 10- 
22. William Meeks, Murray Theatre, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. 

HOTTENTOT. (5,953 feet). Star, Douglas 
MacLean. A knockout that pleased every- 
one. Better than any of his previous pic- 
tures. We got a new print from Des Moines. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Draw small town class in town of 
1,500. W. T. Waugh, Empress Theatre, 
Grundy Center, Iowa. 

HOTTENTOT. (5,953 feet). Star, Douglas 
MacLean. This is one of the best comedy 
dramas I ever ran. They're all still laugh- 
ing about it. You can buy this right, and 
by giving it additional advertising make 
some money. Good moral tone; suitable for 
Sunday. Good attendance, town and country 
class in town of 500. Admission 10-25. A. 
F. Schreiver, Oneida Theatre (225 seats), 
Oneida, South Dakota. 

HOTTENTOT. (5,953 feet). Star, Douglas 
MacLean. This is a 100 per cent, picture. 
A fine entertainment. First time we have 
shown this star, and he seemed to please all. 
Plenty good comments on this picture. 
Played this one in big storm and had good 
attendance. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw rural and city class 
in town of 1,300. Admission 10-20, lA. 
Kenss, Community Theatre (500 seats). New 
Athens, Illinois. 

ISLE OF LOST SHIPS. (7,425 feet). Star, 
Milton Sills. Milton Sills you are to be 
congratulated on your part in this one. 
Here's a picture that was booked on strength 
of our Straight From the Shoulder Depart- 
ment and it did everything the boys said it 
would do. A one hundred percent production 
that had an impossible story, but not a thing 
but praise was heard. Not a single knock. 
Play it, boys, and go after it strong. Moral 
tone fair but it is not suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw general class in 
town of 1,000. Admission 10-25, 15-25. H. H. 
Hedberg, Amuse-U Theatre, Melville, Louisi- 
ana. 

KID. (6 reels). Star, Charles Chaplin. 
The question is, who drew the most? They 
came, saw and were satisfied. The biggest 
matinee we ever had. Moral tone okay and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had big attend- 
ance. Drew working class in town of 4,000. 
Admission fifteen cents. Mitchell Conery, 
I. O. O. F. Hall (225 seats), Green Island, 
New York. 

MAN OF ACTION. (5 reels). Star Doug- 
las MacLean. Clean, entertaining comedy 
drama. Moral tone okay and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had poor attendance. Draw 
small town class in town of 1,269. Admis- 
sion 10-25, 25-35. S. G. Harsh, Princess 
Theatre (249 seats), Mapleton, Iowa. 

MIGHTY LAK A ROSE. (8,036 feet). 
Star, Dorothy Mackaill. This picture proved 
to be a big surprise. While it did not draw 
but an average attendance it was rated as 
one of the best pictures we've shown re- 
cently. Don't be oversold on this because 
it will not draw unless on the title of the 
song. Had average attendance. Draw work- 
ing class in town of 4,000. Admission fifteen 
cents. Mitchell Coney, I. O. O. F. Hall (230 
seats). Green Island, New York. 

MONEY, MONEY, MONEY. (5,995 feet). 
Star, Katherine MacDonald. Picture is punk, 
and that's all there is to it. No action, no 
drawing power, no nothing, tl may please 
some of your eastern highbrows, but here 
in the west It is no good. Draw common 
everyday Americans in town of 1,800. Ad- 
mission 10-30. R. Keehn, Keehn Theatre 
(250 seats), Lebanon, Oregon. 

OLIVER TWIST. (7,000 feet). Star, 
Jackie Coogan. The poorest Coogan pic- 
ture I ever ran. Better not run it — people 
will think more of Jackie. It won't do your 
house any good. Has good moral tone and 
would be suitable for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Draw town of 500 and country 



Thanks H. H. 



"Glad to see that 'the boss' has 
at last awakened to the fact that 
'Straight From the Shoulder' De- 
partment is one of the real fea- 
tures of the Moving Picture 
World and that he is giving you 
more space. 

"To help along with the good 
work I am enclosing a series of 
'typographical errors' which may 
be of assistance to the other boys 
in booking ahead. 

"It MAY be imagination, BUT 
it seems that the reports Our 
Gang turns in are more reliable 
than what is being shot to some of 
the other trade weeklies. 

"Keep up the good work, Van, 
and we'll do all we can to help 
you."— H. H. Hedberg, A-Muse-U 
Theatre, Melville, Louisiana. 



class. Admission 10-25. A. F. Schreiver, 
Oneida Theatre (225 seats), Oneida, South 
Dakota. 

PAINTED PEOPLE. (5,700 feet). Star, 
Colleen Moore. Excellent picture. Poor 
business on account of weather. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw high class in city 
of 18,000. Admission 10-25. J. T. Bangert, 
Orpheum Theatre (1,080 seats), Okmlugee, 
Oklahoma. 

PENROD AND SAM. (6,271 feet). Star, 
Ben Alexander. A wonderful "kid" picture 
which was liked here as much as Jackie 
Coogan's, who is a big favorite here. A won- 
derful production. Moral tone fine and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw mixed class in town of 4,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25-35. Thomas L. Barnett, Finn's 
Theatre (600 seats), Jewett City, Connecticut. 

PENROD AND SAM. (6,275 feet). Star, 
Ben Alexander. Pleased the kids, but the 
grown ups did not take to it. Personally 
thought It a fine show, but when an exhibi- 
tor thinks don't get the "jack." Moral tone 
good and It is suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw miners. Admission 15-25. 
Charles F. Kear, Opera House (450 seats), 
Minersville, Pennsylvania. 

POLLY OF THE FOLLIES. (6,173 feet). 
Star, Constance Talmadge. A very good 
comedy drama which pleased all and price 
was fair. Good print. Moral tone good but 
it is not suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw country and town class in 
town of 800. Admission 10-20-25. Firkins 
and Law, Crystal Theatre (200 seats), Mor- 
avia, Iowa. 

PONJOLA. (7 reels). Star cast. A pleas- 
ing audience picture. Draw mixed class in 



town of 1,900. Admission varies. L. G 
Roesner, Colonial Theatre (800 seats) Win- 
ona, Minnesiota. 

PONJOLA. (7 reels). Star, Anna Q. Nils- 
son. This picture drew a fair business but 
the asking price is too high. The picture is 
nothing to rave about. Class as program 
picture. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
town and country class in town of 2,500. 
Admission 10-25. A. F. Affelt, Liberty Thea- 
tre (440 seats), St. Louis, Michigan. 

PONJOLA. (7 reels). Star, Anna Q. Nils- 
son. I thought it very poor entertainment. 
If your patrons enjoy seven reels of a 
"drunk" whom you expect to have the 
"snakes" in every reel, book this. Hardly 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw family and student class in town of 
4,000. Admission 10-25. R. J. Relf, Star 
Theatre (600 seats), Decorah, Iowa. 

POTASH AND PERLM UTTER. (7,700 
feet). Star cast. After all the good reports 
this was a disappointment to me. Do not 
consider it nearly as good as Paramount's 
"The Good Provider," and cost nearly dou- 
ble. Moral tone good and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw fam- 
ily and student class in town of 4,000. Ad- 
mission 10-25. R. J. Relf, Star Theatre (600 
seats), Decorah, Iowa. 

REFUGE. (6,000 feet). Star, Katherine 
McDonald. Very poor. Katie can't act, she 
only poses. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had poor attendance 
Draw all classes in city of 15,000. Admis- 
sion 10-35. S. A. Hayman, Dyda Theatre 
(360 seats), Grand Island, Nebraska. 

REFUGE. (6,000 feet). Star, Katherine 
MacDonald. Good program picture, but star 
will not draw for us. Suitable for Sunday. 
Had poor attendance. Draw small town class 
in town of 3,500. Admission 20-35. P. L. 
Vann, Opera House (800 seats), Greenville, 
Alabama. 

SCARLET LILY. (6 reels). Star, Kather- 
ine McDonald. Her poorest one I've played 
yet. Never do any business on them, any- 
way. Not suitable for Sunday. Had poor 
attendance. Draw family and student class 
in town of 4,000. Admission 10-25. R. J. 
Relf, Star Theatre (600 seats), Decorah, Iowa. 

SCARS OF JEALOUSY. (6,246 feet). Star, 
Frank Keenan. A very interesting and well 
told picture that satisfied my audience one 
hundred percent and what more do you want 
than that. Forest fire scenes especially 
beautiful. Moral tone O. K. and it Is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
mixed class in town of 4,000. Admission 
10-25-35. Thomas L. Barnett, Finn's Theatre 
(600 seats), Jewett City, Connecticut. 

SIGN ON THE DOOR. (7,100 feet). Star, 
Norma Talmadge. A heavy drama. No bet- 
ter than one thousand others. Nothing 
special, but price. Will please about fifty 
per cent. Moral tone good, but it is not 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw town and country class In town of 
800. Admission 10-20-25. Firkins and Law, 
Crystal Theatre (200 seats). Moravia, Iowa. 

SONG OF LOVE. (8,000 feet). Star, Nor- 
ma Talmadge. Injustice to the best actress 
in the world. Not the type of picture this 
fair lady should work in. Audience did not 



Released May 11, 1924 — Now Booking 



Dorothy Mackaill 

in i, 




II 



WHAT SHAH I DO 



a Frank £ .W£x)ds Special 'flrvducticn 

fi HODKINSON RELEASE 
Season 192* 1925 TnjrtyRrtf-Hunftctures £ 



184 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



relish It. Hops her director can see his 
error. Moral tone O. K. and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Attendance fell fiat. Draw best 
class. W. C. Mclntire, Rose Theatre, Burling- 
ton, North Carolina. 

SONNY. (6,900 feet). Star, Richard Bar- 
thelmess. A rattling good picture; get be- 
hind this one. It's worth pushing. Reels 
In good shape. Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
H. W. Mathers, Morris Run Theatre, Morris 
Run, Pennsylvania. 

SONNY (6,900 feet). Star, Richard Bar- 
thelmess. Here is a feature that you all 
want to play. While not a new release, still 
it is head and shoulders above a lot of later 
and so-called big pictures; take a tip and 
book it if you have a chance. Moral tone 
splendid and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
fair attendance. Draw mixed class in town 
of 4,500. Admission 10-30. M. C. Kellogg, 
Homestake Theatre (800 seats), Dead, South 
Dakota. 

THTJNDERGATE. (6,745 feet). Star, Owen 
Moore. A very interesting Chinese play. 
Very good acting. Dual role of Moore very 
clever. Patrons pleased and said so; best 
one we have ever shown of this star. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
fair attendance. Draw farmers and business 
class in town of 2,200. Admission 10-25. A. 
F. Jenkins, Community Theatre (491 seats), 
David City, Nebraska. 

THl.XDERGATE. (6,505 feet). Star, Owen 
Moore. A fair enough picture and one that 
should be bought reasonable for here It 
positively had "draw" at the box office. A 
fair program picture, govern yourself accord- 
ingly. Special, never. Usual advertising 
brought fair attendance. Draw health seek- 
ers and tourists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac 
Theatre Beautiful, Saranac Lake, New York. 

TWENTY-ONE. (6,560 feet). Star, Richard 
Barthelmess. Not as big from a production 
angle as some of his, but a picture that will 
please the masses a whole lot better. Was 
very well liked here. Had tough opposition 
on this date, and didn't get any coin, but 
that's that. Usual advertising brought fair 
attendance. Draw health seekers and tour- 
ists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beau- 
tiful, Saranac Lake, New York. 

WANTERS. (6,871 feet). Star, Marie 
Prevost. A good program picture (not a 
special) and will please if you can get them 
in and hold them for first three reels. Ex- 
hibition value too high. Would suit society 
class, but not so good for farmers. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
fair attendance. Draw farmers in town of 
2,500. Admission 10-20, 10-25. H. J. Long- 
aker, Howard Theatre (350 seats), Alexan- 
dria, Minnesota. 

WANTERS. (6,871 feet). Star cast. 1 
bought this as an ordinary program picture. 
It fooled me and proved to be one of the 
best liked pictures I have shown here in a 
long time. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had poor attendance on account 
of weather. Draw all classes in small town. 
Admission 10-33. M. W. Larmour, National 
Theatre (450 seats), Graham, Texas. 

WANDERING DAUGHTERS. (5,471 feet). 
Star, Marguerite De LaMotte. Had many 
kicks on this one. Story was not probable 



Tells Patrons 



On a postal card sent to mailing 
list, Town Hall Picture Company, 
Norridgewock, Maine, advertises 
the coming of Goldwyn's "Strang- 
er's Banquet" in this fashion: 

"We are stumped — sometimes 
we are sure — sometimes we guess 
— and sometimes we just DUN- 
NO." 

Follows an announcement of the 
picture, then this: 

"This picture has 22 stars in it 
and some Sons and Daughters, so 
you see it is quite a universe. 
Goldwyn's film salesman said it 
was good and we believed him and 
we were so tickled about having 
it that we looked up all the 
'Straight From the Shoulder* talk 
about it in Moving Picture World. 
Some say 'It's fine' and some say 
'Not so good.' That's why WE 
DUNNO. Guess you'll hafter 
come and help us settle it." 

Maybe YOU can get something 
out of this stunt, too. 



and a very poor story to boot. The people 
did not hesitate in telling me that it was 
disgusting. Moral tone, jazz-age story. Not 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw all types in town of 1.500. Admission 
10-22. C. Ernest Liggett, Liggett Theatre 
(600 seats), Madison, Kansas. 

Fox 

LONE STAR RANGER. (5,259 feet). Star, 
Tom Mix. A real picture; you can't go wrong 
by booking this. Broke all box office records. 
Advertised heavily, but profited by same. 
Good moral tone, but not suitable for Sun- 
day. Draw all classes in town of 3,500. Ad- 
mission 10-25. A. C. Wooten, Majestic Thea- 
tre (350 seats), Liberal, Kansas. 

MAN'S MATE. (5,041 feet). Star, John 
Gilbert. A good picture; print fine; but we 
struck a blizzard. A good Saturday night 
picture. Attendance fair. Draw all classes 
in town of 3,500. Admission 10-25. A. C. 
Wooten, Majestic Theatre (350 seats), Lib- 
eral, Kansas. 

MOONSHINE VALLEY. (5,619 feet). Star, 
William Farnum. An overdrawn, slow-mov- 
ing, heavy melodrama that interests no one 
except crepe hangers. Pleases about ten 
per cent and classed by me as rotten; 
should be run only by church. Had poor 
attendance. Draw farming class in town of 



1,500. Admission 10-30. J. A. Harvey, 
Strand Theatre (280 seats), Vacaville, Cali- 
fornia. 

MONTE CRISTO. (8 reels). Star cast. A 
very good picture, but is too large for a 
small town. Film in good shape. Did not 
like the death scene. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw farming class in town of 360. 
Admission 20-35. C. W. Mills, Outlook Thea- 
tre (200 seats), Outlook, Montana. 

NO MOTHER TO GUIDE HER. (7,000 feet). 
Star cast. Good picture with melodramatic 
climaxes. A regular Fox picture. You could 
tell this is a Fox picture if it did not have 
the name on it. Why is it a special? Just 
the price. Moral tone fair. Had fair attend- 
ance. J. J. Spandan, Family Theatre, Brad- 
dock, Pennsylvania. 

NO MOTHER TO GUIDE HER. (7,000 feet). 
Star cast. Fox program is absolutely off this 
year. Moral tone passable, but it Is not 
suitable for Sunday in all localities. Had 
awful attendance. Draw general class in 
city of 25,000. Admission 18-35. Frank J. 
Franer, Rialto Theatre (700 seats), New 
London, Connecticut. 

NOT A DRUM WAS HEARD. (4,823 feet). 

Star, Charles "Buck" Jones. Am sure glad 
to see Jones in a western again. So were my 
patrons. He had about killed himself here 
with his other late pictures, but this one 
comes back strong. It was well liked and 
did much better business than any Jones 
picture for a long time. Moral tone O. K. 
Had good attendance. Draw all classes in 
small town. Admission 10-33. M. W. Lar- 
mour, National Theatre (450 seats), Graham, 
Texas. 

PAWN TICKET 210. (4,871 feet). Star, 
Shirley Mason. A poor picture for this star; 
just a common story that doesn't end up very 
well, but well played. Shirley is a good 
drawing card for us. Good moral tone; O. K. 
for Sunday. Good attendance. Draw miners 
and factory people, town of 900. Admission 
10-25. Lee Dillingham, Kozy Theatre (250 
seats), Nortonville, Kentucky. 

ROMANCE LAND. (3,975 feet). Star, Tom 
Mix. Acting good, but Tom is out of place 
in this picture. Film in good shape. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw farming class in 
town of 350. Admission 20-35. C. W. Mills, 
Outlook Theatre (200 seats), Outlook, Mon- 
tana. 

SHADOW OF THE EAST. (5,874 feet). 
Star, Frank Mayo. Didn't go over here. Jfou 
might have more luck. If you think vou 
have, take It. If not, bands off. Mayo 
looked too dissipated for the part. Moral 
tone all right. Suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw general class in town 
of 23,000. Admission 18-35. Frank Franer, 
Empire Theatre, New London, Connecticut. 

SHEPHERD KING. (8,500 feet). Star cast. 
They walked out in wholesale on this one. 
The Fox so-called specials are only fair 
pictures that have absolutely no drawing 
power for us. Moral tone fine and is suitable 
for Sunday. Had awful attendance. Draw 
general class in city of 25,000. Admission 
18-35. Frank J. Franer, Rialto Theatre (300 
seats), New London, Connecticut. 

SKID PROOF. (5,565 feet). Star, Charles 
"Buck" Jones. I consider this the best 
Jones' picture of last year. You can mn 
this any day and please your patrons. Not 
a western, but a good picture. Moral tone 
good. Had good attendance. Draw town and 
rural class in town of 3,000. Admission 10- 
25. S. H. Rich, Rich Theatre (480 seats), 
Montpelier, Idaho. 

SOUTH SEA LOVE. (4,168 feet). Star, 
Shirley Mason. Fair program feature. In 
fact one of best star shown in for some 
time, which isn't saying much. Shirley not 
very popular l.ere and fails to bring them 
in. Played with last of fourth "Leather 
Pushers" " and Clyde Cook comedy and 
pleased the crowd. Moral tone fair and 
may be suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw mixed class In town of 
1,000. H. H. Hedberg, Amuse-U Theatre (200 
seats), Melville, Louisiana. 

THREE JUMPS AHEAD. (4,864 feet). 
Star, Tom Mix. A typical Mix picture. 
Pleased a capacity house. Full of comedy 
and action; the kind that makes you forget 
business is bad. Moral tone O. K. Suitable 




May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



185 



for Sunday. Draw miners and factory peo- 
ple, town of 900. Admission 10-25. .Lee 
Dillingham, Kozy Theatre (250 seats), Nor- 
tonville, Kentucky. 

VILLAGE: BLACKSMITH. (8 reels). Star 
cast. Opinions on this one very much divid- 
ed. Some said it was great. Others thought 
it heavy and commonplace. However, it 
brought very good attendance. City of 
110,000. Admission 10-20. Al C. Werner, 
Royal Theatre, Reading, Pennsylvania. 

YOU CAN'T GET AWAY WITH IT. (6,152 
feet). Star cast. When it comes to Fox 
calling their pictures specials they are all 
wet. Fox's program stuff is far ahead of 
their specials. Have only played one special 
that was any good and it was "Soft Boiled." 
Not suitable for Sunday. Had poor attend- 
ance. Draw all types in town of 1,500. Ad- 
mission 10-22. C. Ernest Liggett, Liggett 
Theatre (600 seats), Madison, Kansas. 

Goldwyn 

SLAVE OF DESIRE. (7 reels). Star, Car- 
mel Myers. A very good program picture. 
Carmel Myers is truly beautiful. Plot good 
Other attraction and rain against me. Moral 
tone not so bad. Attendance about thirty. 
Draw merchants and family class in town 
of 1,800. Admission 20-25-40. J. W. Watts, 
Strand Theatre (250 seats), Williamston, 
North Carolina. 

SLIM PRINCESS. Star, Mabel Normand. 
Not a new picture, but goes over great. 
Mabel is a thin princess in a country where 
weight means beauty and a pneumatic suit 
is invented. Moral tone good; probably suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw town and country 
class. Admission 20-40. Ernest D. Gruppe, 
Fausto Theatre, Isle of Pines, West Indies. 

SPOILERS. (8,028 feet). Star cast. This 
one got 'em, good picture, wonderful, etc., 
were the comments I heard. When story is 
good and the acting to match it brings them 
in. A box-office attraction. Had good at- 
tendance. City of 110,000. Admission 10-20. 
Al. C. Werner, Royal Theatre, Reading, 
Pennsylvania. 

STRANGER'S BANQUET. (8,531 feet). 
Star cast. Picture well liked; title a puzzle, 
to many. Why not let title be suggestive of 
type of picture? Moral tone good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw farming class in town of 600. Admis- 
sion 15-25. C. C. Kluts, Glades Theatre (200 
seats), Moore Haven, Florida. 

THREE WISE FOOLS. (6,946 feet). Star 
cast. Played two nights. A feature that 
should go over for any exhibitor, as it is a 
fine show. The actors play their parts ju3t 
right. There was one thing that was not 
right about this show, though. Reel five 
had part six tagged on it and reel six had 
part five patched on it. Of course when 
this got on the screen the continuity was all 
balled up, but as I had seen this show before 
I switched the reels. Very nice film service 
from Goldwyn now, wasn't it? To cap it all, 
the very end of the last reel had three 
mis-frames in it in the last six feet besides 
bringing the words the end on the screen 
out of frame. Attendance, good first night; 
poor second night. Draw better class in 
town of 4,500. Admission 10-15. C. A. Angle- 
mire, "Y" Theatre, Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 

WHEN ROMANCE RIDES. (5,003 feet). 
Star cast. Our people did not consider this 
as good as some of the Zane Grey pictures. 
Good attendance. Draw all classes in town 
of 1,800. Admissic-n 15-20. J. Neal Lonigan, 
Colonial Theatre (450 seats), Moulton, Iowa. 

WHEN ROMANCE RIDES. (5,003 feet). 
Star, Claire Adams. Zane Grey picture, old 
but good. Moral tone fine and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
neighborhood class in town of 450. Admis- 
sion 10-22. Roy E. Cllne, Osage Theatre (225 
seats), Osage, Oklahoma. 

WHITE SLAVE. Star, Leatrice Joy. A 
tale of two worlds that is entertaining. Plot 
laid in China, well carried and smooth. Good 
moral tone. Draw all town and country 
classes. Admission 20-40. Ernest D. Gruppe, 
Fausto Theatre, Isle of Pines, West Indies. 

Hodkinson 

AT SIGN OF THE JACK O'LANTBRN. 
(5,193 feet). Star cast. Good entertainment. 



Comedies 



I find all of the Educational Comedies 
good, especially the following which I 
have played lately: 

Hold Everything 

Back Fire 

Three Cheers 

Front 

Runnin' Wild 
Aggravatin' Papa 
Neck and Neck 

— C. W. CUPP. 



George R. Johnson, Fountain Theatre, Foun- 
tain, Colorado. 

CAMERON OF THE ROYAL MOUNTED. 

(5,690 feet). Star cast. One of the best. 
George R. Johnson, Fountain Theatre, Foun- 
tain, Colorado. 

MAN FROM GLENGARRY. (5,800 feet). 
Star cast. Fair program picture that takes 
with those who like outdoor stuff. Brought 
fair attendance. City of 110,000. Admission 
10-20. - Al. C. Werner, Royal Theatre, Read- 
ing, Pennsylvania. 

RADIO-MANIA. (5,400 feet). Star, Grant 
Mitchell. Should never have ruined six 
thousand feet of good film on which to print 
this disgrace to fllmdom. Not suitable any 
day in the week. Attendance, none. Draw 
all classes in town of 4,000. Admission 10-20. 
F. A. Brown, Amuse-U Theatre (300 seats), 
Frederick, Oklahoma. 

Metro 

ALL THE BROTHERS WERE VALIANT. 

(6,265 feet). Star cast. A good Sadurday 
picture. Chaney displays his wonderful act- 
ing as he does in all of his pictures. Mac- 
Gregor and Dove did good work; scenes of 
the whales were good. Draw small town 
class in town of 1,500. W. T. Waugh, Em- 
press Theatre, Grundy Center, Iowa. 

BROADWAY ROSE. (7,277 feet). Star, 
Mae Murray. A good program picture that 
pleased all of the Murray fans. The colored 
prologue is beautiful and well worked out. 
Could be put in seven reels. Draw small 
town class in town of 1,500. W. T. Waugh, 
Empress Theatre, Grundy Center, Iowa. 

FAMOUS MRS. FAIR. (7,000 feet). Star 
cast. Many of our patrons praised this one 
sky high, and wished we would have more 
like it. Snow, mud and slush up here in the 
mountains where we are, but pictures like 
these will draw the crowds. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
very good attendance considering traveling. 
Draw farmers and lumbermen in town of 625. 
Admission 10-25. Benson and Landman, 
Town Hall Theatre (500 seats), South Lon- 
donderry, Vermont. 

FASCINATION. (7,940 feet). Star, Mae 
Murray. This does credit to the star and it 
should please most everyone. Especially is 
this true to the Mae Murray followers. We 
like her. Moral tone O. K., but it is not 



suitable for Sunday. Had poor attendance. 
Draw merchants and family class in town 
of 1,800. Admission 20-25-40. J. W. Watts, 
Strand Theatre (250 seats), Williamston, 
North Carolina. 

FASHION ROW. (7,300 feet). Star, Mae 
Murray. Something radical must happen to 
save Mae Murray. Once she got the box 
office record. Now a poor card. This one 
same old struttin' stuff they're tired of. 
Moral tone fair. Had only fair attendance. 
Draw farming class in town of 1,500. Ad- 
mission 10-30. J. A. Harvey, Strand Theatre 
(280 seats), Vacaville, California. 

FASHION ROW. (7,300 feet). Star, Mae 
Murray. Elaborate picture which appealed 
to those who saw it, but not many saw it. 
We can't understand lack of patronage on 
this one. Moral tone questionable and it is 
hardly suitable for Sunday. Had poor at- 
tendance. Draw general class in city of 
25,000. Admission 18-35. Frank J. Franer, 
Rialto Theatre (700 seats), New London, Con- 
necticut. 

FASHION ROW. (7,300 feet). Star, Mae 
Murray. A very well produced picture that 
pleased. They've got the rental on this 
young lady rather steep and this picture is 
no better if as good as some of her earlier 
offerings, so think that over. Used herald, 
mailing list, etc. Had good attendance. Draw 
health seekers and tourists. Dave Seymour, 
Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, Saranac Lake, 
New York. 

FOG. (6,500 feet). Star cast. Picture very 
good, and film in good condition as it always 
is when they come from Metro Boston ex- 
change. Moral tone very good and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw farmers and lumbermen in town of 625. 
Admission 10-25. Benson and Landman, 
Town Hall Theatre (500 seats), South Lon- 
donderry, Vermont. 

FRENCH DOLL. (7,028 feet). Star, Mae 
Murray. No business but we blame Lent. 
We have seen a good many bad reports about 
this one, but can't say that we agree. Mur- 
ray fidgety but the part required it. Had 
poor attendance. Draw general class in town 
of 23,000. Admission 18-35. Frank Franer, 
Rialto Theatre, New London, Connecticut. 

HAPPINESS. (7,700 feet). Star, Laurette 
Taylor. "Peg O' My Heart," Laurette's first 
picture, was an immense success, but after 
playing "Happiness" and hearing the groans 
that came from our audience at the finish 
of this picture, as far as we are concerned, 
it Is back to the speaking stage for Laurette 
and as for the director. King Vidor had 
better get a pick and shovel and go to work 
if this is the best he can turn out. Here is 
a picture that can not get started, footage 
wasted right from the start in a bid for a 
laugh with Taylor In a grotesque mask. Oh! 
for the crying out loud! If you have not 
bought it, let it alone; if you have bought 
it set it out and trade with them when they 
come around after another contract. It is 
the kind of picture that takes the bread 
from the exhibitor's child and drives people 
away from the movies. And did you notice 
the flossy review that this trade paper gave 
it? I wonder if the party that wrote it ever 
saw a rotten audience picture. They did not 
name it right; instead of "Happiness" it 
should have been named the "Slough of 
Despond," from the exhibitors' viewpoint. 



Released May 25, 1924 —Now Booking 




YClft BREATH 

an Al Christie Feature ~toitk 



Dorothy Devore 

Walter Hiers , Tully Marshal], 
Jimmie Adams Priscilla Bonner 
and Jimmie Harrison 

HODKINSON RELEASE 

Season 1924-1925 Thirty First-Run Pictures 



186 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



1 run it yet tomorrow night and I'll bet 
seven dollars will cover the take, from the 
comments I heard on it. They will advertise 
It as being good and rotten. Arthur E. 
Hancock, Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, 
Indiana. 

LONG LIVE THE KING. (9,364 feet). Star, 
Jackie Coogan. A very good picture, but the 
nine reels could have been made more in- 
teresting by cutting them to seven. How- 
ever, my public wants Coogan in the type of 
"Circus Days." Moral tone good. Had fair 
attendance. Draw small town class in town 
of 6,000. Admission 10-30. L O. Davis, Vir- 
ginia Theatre (600 seats), Hazard, Kentucky. 

MAN LIFE PASSED BY. (6,208 feet). Star, 
Percy Marmont. Boys, here's one corker. 
Better than many of the big specials and it 
can be bought right. Had poor attendance 
on account of a terrible snow storm, but 
got an even break at that. Moral tone fair 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had poor 
attendance. Draw mixed class in town of 
4,000. Admission 10-25-35. Thomas L. Bar- 
nett, Finn's Theatre (600 seats), Jewett City, 
Connecticut. 

NOISE in NEWBORO. (5,500 feet). Star, 
Viola Dana. Rotten. Moral tone good. Not 
suitable for Sunday nor any other day. Draw 
all classes in town of 2,000. Admission 10- 
30. H. Loyd, Colonial Theatre (400 seats), 
Post, Texas. 

POLLY WITH A PAST. (6 reels) Star, 
Ina Claire. An amusing clever program pic- 
ture that pleased our American and Cuban 
audience. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Draw American and Cubans. 
Admission 20-40. Ernest D. Gruppe, Fausto 
Theatre (200 seats), Santa Fe, Isle of Pines, 
West Indies. 

ROUGED LIPS. (5,150 feet). Star, Viola 
Dana. Just an ordinary program picture; 
not as good as "The Heart Bandit" or "Her 
Fatal Millions," which we used some time 
ago. Metro works this star to death, making 
one good picture, then several poor ones. 
Not suitable for Sunday. Ran two days to 
poor attendance. Draw general class in 
town of 2,900. A. E. Andrews, Opera House, 
Emporium, Pennsylvania. 

SCAR AMOU CHE. (9,600 feet). Star, 
Ramon Navarro. One of the biggest and 
best of the entire season. Pleased one hun- 
dred per cent, but failed to draw as big 
as expected. Made a good profit, though, 
thanks to the Metro policy. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Draw farming class in town 
of 1,500. Admission 10-30. J. A. Harvey, 
Strand Theatre (280 seats), Vacaville, Cali- 
fornia. 

THREE AGES. (5,500 feet). Star, Buster 

Keaton. A good comedy drama that my 
audience enjoyed. He's better in modern 
stories, though. Draw small town class In 
town of 6,000. Admission 10-30. L. O. Davis, 
Virginia Theatre (600 seats;, Hazard, Ken- 
tucky. 

TRAILING AFRICAN WILD ANIMALS. 

(6 reels). Star cast. One of the best pic- 
tures of its kind ever shown in my house. 
It has high educational value, but will hold 
Interest. Moral tone good and it is suitable 



Play Profitable 
Pictures 

for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
town and country class In town of 800. Ad- 
mission 10-30. Chas. L Nott, Opera House 
(400 seats), Sutherland, Iowa. 

TRIFLING WOMEN. (9 reels). Star, Bar- 
bara LaMarr. A super love story helped 
quite a bit by Barbara LaMarr, Ra.non Na- 
varro, and Lewis Stone. Ingram's direction 
was as usual very good. Drew good crowd 
for the time of the year. Moral tone fair 
but it is hardly suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw farmers and lum- 
bermen in town of 625. Admission 10-25. 
Benson and Landman, Town Hall Theatre 
(500 seats), South Londerry, Vermont. 

WHERE THE PAVEMENT ENDS. (7,706 
feet). Star, Ramon Navarro. A wonderful 
picture that drew in special fashion at 
regular prices. Pleased the women most, 
but the men liked the scenery, etc. Classed 
as a classic. Moral tone fair, and it is a 
better week day picture. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw farming class in town of 1,500. 
Admission 10-30, 25-50. J. A. Harvey, Strand 
Theatre (280 seats), Vacaville, California. 

WHITE SISTER. (14 reels). Star. Lillian 
Gish. "The White Sister" is Lillian Gish's 
best picture. Lillian Gish as the girl tricked 
out of her fortune, her own lover sought by 
her scheming half-sister. A fight on the 
desert filmed In Algeria. A cross-country 
hunt, filmed in the old-world beauty of 
Italy. Vesuvious belching lava in actual 
eruption. A whole town flooded by a burst- 
ing dam. The greatest love story of all time, 
and many other thrilling scenes and climaxes 
are to be seen in "The White Sister." A 
mighty good picture to book. William Noble, 
Criterion Theatre, Oklahoma City, Okla- 
homa. 

YOUTH TO YOUTH. (6,900 feet). Star 
cast. A fairly good "heavy" paper, oh, boy! 
Metro gets the "booby prize" for paper; 
makes no difference how good the picture 
the paper turns them away, not only on this 
but everything we get from them. Soon be 
done with them. Oh, boy! Walt till you 
get yours! What the paper "didn't do to 
me." Moral tone O. K. and it Is suitable for 
Sunday. Attendance, nil. Draw farm and 
oil class in town of 508. J. A. Herring. Play 
House Theatre (249 seats), Strong, Arkansas. 



Paramount 

ACROSS THE CONTINENT. (5,481 feet). 
Star, Wallace Reid. This picture looks like 
propaganda for Henry (although he doesn't 
need it). Be that as it may, Wallie Reid 
and the Dent car made a combination hard to 
beat, either in pictures or cross-country rac- 
ing. If any audience don't like this picture, 
they ought to have to ride in flivvers the rest 
of their lives. Moral tone good and it is 



suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw rural class in town of 300. Admission 
20-30, specials 22-39. Charles W. Lewis, L O. 
O. F. Hall (225 seats), Grand Gorge, New 
York. 

AT THE END OF THE WORLD. (5,729 

feet). Star, Betty Compson. This is an ex- 
cellent production. Well liked by all and 
will please. Our old friend. Milton Sills, 
takes a prominent part. Moral tone good. 
Draw all classes In town of 400. Admission 
15-25. F. M. Croop, Crescent Theatre (200 
seats), Leonardsville, New York. 

BIG BROTHER. (7,080 feet). Star, Tom 

Moore. A very good picture and one that I 
liked, though it fell down on the second 
night, which with me indicates that the 
crowd does not agree with my opinion of the 
show. The boy, Mickie Bennett, Is clever. 
Moral tone good and It is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw all classes 
in town of 3,200. Admission 10-20-30. Chas. 
Leehyde, Grand Theatre (500 seats), Pierre, 
South Dakota. 

BLUEBEARD "S EIGHTH WIFE. (5,960 
feet). Star, Gloria Swanson. Another tri- 
umph for Gloria; who says she can't act? 
Good support by Huntley Gordon and fine 
comedy by Robert Agnew. Strong story, 
with suspense sustained throughout. Scenario 
worthy of June Mathis. Will please any 
audience. Rate my pictures from 1 poor to 
12 big, gave this one 10. Attendance is al- 
ways good for this star. Draw city and 
country class in town of 3,000. Admission 
10-30. George W. Walther, Dixie Theatre, 
Kerrville, Texas. 

CALL OF THE NORTH. (4,823 feet). Star, 
Jack Holt. Very good outdoor picture; with 
sufficient advertising should bring results. 
Moral tone good. Draw all classes in town 
of 400. Admission 15-25. F. M. Croop, Cres- 
cent Theatre (200 seats), Leonardsville, New 
York. 

CHEAT. (6,323 feet). Star, Pola Negri. 
Those who came to see it said It was a good 
picture, and those who stayed away made 
the box office results look sick. I bought the 
show reluctantly, and the result shows I 
should never have bought It at all. People 
In the smaller towns don't want Pola yet. 
City of 110,000. Admission 10-20. Al. C. 
Werner, Royal Theatre, Reading, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

CHEAT. (6,323 feet). Star, Poll Negri. A 
good picture, nothing wrong with It here 
except my patrons don't like Pola. Had poor 
attendance. Draw laboring class In town of 
2,145. Admission 10-25. H. D. Wharton, Pas- 
time Theatre (400 seats). Warren, Arkansas. 

FOG BOUND. (5,692 feet). Star, Dorothy 
Dalton. Interesting program picture. Should 
sell at program prices. Moral tone O. K. 
Had average atendance. Draw all classes 
in town of 4,000. Admission 10-20-30. C. T. 
Meisburg, Harrodsburg Opera House (600 
seats), Harrodsburg, Kentucky. 

FOOL'S PARADISE. (8 reels). Star cast. 
An 8-reel feature which Is interesting from 
start to finish. Suitable for Sunday. Had 
Kood attendance. Draw mixed class in town 
of 800. Admission 15-25. Jerry Wertin. 
Winter Theatre (?50 seats), Albany, Minne- 
sota 

FOR THE DEFENSE. Star, Ethel Clayton. 
Fair program picture. Clayton quite well 
liked here, especially by the ladies. They 
take to Ethel's pretty clothes. Moral tone 
good and it is fine for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Draw small town and country 
class in town of 735. Admission 10-25. Helen 
Drexter. Star Theatre (190 seats), Crafton, 
Nebraska. 

HUMMING BIRD. (7,577 feet). Star. Gloria 

Swanson. Great picture, but not liked here 
as much as they liked "Bluebeard's Eighth 
Wife," although it will draw. They all like 
Gloria in dressed up pictures. We came out 
better on this one as the Paramount people 
were charging us too much on Gloria Swan- 
son before. Moral tone pretty good. Had 
pretty good attendance. Draw all classes in 
town of 3,000. W. H. Odom, Pastime Theatre, 
Sandersville, Georgia. 

GOOD PROVIDER. (7,753 feet). Star, 
Anna Q. Nilsson. A fair program which 
was well liked by some and others not. Not 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw mixed class in town of 800. Admission 
15-25. Jerry Wertin, Winter Theatre, Albany, 
Minnesota. 



National Release Date, June 15, 
192 4— Now Booking 

Qlie Wonder 
Picture of 
t lie year 




or 



HODKINSON RELEASE 

Season I92-M925 TWty first-Dun Pictures 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



187 



GREEN TEMPTATION. (5 reels). Star, 
Betty Compson. Good picture. You cannot 
advertise this too much. Will fulfill all 
promises. Moral tone good and is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 1,500. Admission 10-25. 
Miss Douglas Robertson, Princess T'heatre 
(200 seats), Flemingsburg, Kentucky. 

HER HUSBAND'S TRADEMARK. (5,701 
feet). Star, Gloria Swanson. Good program 
picture. Buy at program prices. Not a big 
picture. Moral tone O. K. Had average at- 
tendance. Draw all classes in town of 4,000. 
Admission 10-20-30. C. T. Meisburg, Har- 
rodsburg Opera House (600 seats), Harrods- 
burg, Kentucky. 

HERITAGE OP THE DESERT. (5,785 
feet). Star cast. I haven't seen "Covered 
Wagon" not caring to pay the price I don't 
dare charge, but if they will make them all 
as good as "Heritage of the Desert" there 
will be more going to the movies in a short 
time. This is a splendid western with tense 
action and the most beautiful western shots 
you ever saw; also for action there are more 
horses driven in a herd than I thought the 
West contained. Nothing more to be de- 
sired in entertainment for any kind of an 
audience than is contained in this splendid 
picture of Paramount's. One picture that 
the press sheet did not over-rate. Arthur 
E. Hancock, Columbia Theatre, Columbia 
City, Indiana. 

HIS CHILDREN'S CHILDREN. (8,300 feet). 
Star cast. Good picture that pleased one 
hundred per cent. Direction above par; can 
recommend this to the most critical; story 
does not drag. Will hold the interest from 
start to finish. Regular advertising to good 
attendance. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw best class in the 
world, veterans of the World War in town 
of 600. Admission 15-30. Adolph Schutz, 
Fort Bayard Theatre (300 seats), Fort Bay- 
ard, New Mexico. 

HIS CHILDREN'S CHILDREN. (8,300 feet). 
Star, Bebe Daniels. An excellent picture of 
jazz life from the novel penned by Arthur 
Train. William Noble, Rialto Theatre, Okla- 
homa City, Oklahoma. 

HOLLYWOOD. (8,100 feet). Star cast. A 
fine picture of the novelty type. Pleased 
nearly all and is fine. Regular admission 
picture, but hardly worth a raise. Moral tone 
fair. Had good attendance. Draw farming 
class in town of 1,500. Admission 10-30, 25- 
50. J. A. Harvey, Strand Theatre (280 seats), 
Vacaville, California, 

HOMEWARD BOUND. (7,000 feet). Star, 
Thomas Meighan. One of the very best sea 
stories of today. Thomas Meighan does won- 
derful acting in this picture; can't go wrong 
by booking this picture. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Leonard Falgaut, Raceland Thea- 
tre (500 seats), Raceland, Louisiana. 

KICK IN. (7,674 feet). Star cast. Good; 
in fact, It is of the entertaining qualities 
we need instead of a lot of rubbish sold to 
us heretofore. It is the kind we need for 
regular program stuff. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw farmers in town of 2,500. 
Admission 10-20, 10-25. H. J. Dongaker, 
Howard T'heatre (350 seats), Alexandria, 
Minnesota. 

LIGHT THAT FAILED. (7,013 ieet). Star 
cast. This is what I call a real picture. The 
direction of this picture was great; acting of 
Percy Marmont could not be beat. Pleased 
them all. Good moral tone, suitable for 
Sunday. Regular advertising brought good 
attendance. Adolph Schutz, Fort Bayard 
Theatre, Fort Bayard, New Mexico. 

MAN WHO SAW TOMORROW. (6,993 feet). 
Star, Thomas Meighan. One of Tommy's 
few poor ones; altogether too improbable 
and too dragged out. Better lay off this one, 
especially if Meighan Is favorite with your 
audience. Moral tone O. K. and )t suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
mixed class in town of 4,000. Admission 10- 
25-35. Thomas L. Bamett, Finn's Theatre 
(600 seats), Jewett City, Connecticut. 

MARRIAGE MAKER. (6,295 feet). Star, 
Jack Holt. No excuse for this picture to have 
ever been released. Most of my patrons got 
up and left before it finished. About the 



Employ Exhibitors 9 
Experiences 



sorriest Paramount the writer ever ran. 
Hope they don't do it again. Moral tone — 
crazy. Suitable for Sunday — hardly know. 
Had pretty good attendance of all classes in 
town of 3,000. Admission 10-20-30. W. H. 
Odom, Pastime Theatre (250 seats), Sanders- 
ville, Georgia. 

MARRIAGE MAKER. (6,295 feet). Star, 
Jack Holt. This went clear over their heads. 
No one seemed to understand it and as a 
consequence heard some adverse criticism. 
Had poor attendance. City of 110,000. Ad- 
mission 10-20. Al C. Werner, Royal Theatre, 
Reading, Pennsylvania. 

NEXT CORNER. (7,081 feet). Star, Con- 
way Tearle. Nothing to rave about. Bum 
story. Dorothy Mackalll does poor acting. 
"Plastigrams" helped us a good deal to bring 
people in. Moral tone fair and It is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw bet- 
ter class in city of 91,000. Admission 20-40. 
Jack Hobby, Arcade T'heatre (1,150 seats), 
Jacksonville, Florida, 

NICE PEOPLE. (6,244 feet). Star cast. I 
did not step on this because I was a little 
afraid of its moral tone. Delicate situations 
handled so that it takes fine. Very good pic- 
ture. Pleased nearly one hundred per cent. 
Moral tone good. Not suitable for Sunday. 
Had fair attendance, good class in town of 
500. Admission 15-35. H. G. Braden, Little 
Red School Theatre (176 seats), Avery, 
Idaho. 

NOBODY'S MONEY. (5,584 feet). Star, 
Jack Holt. Average picture. Nothing to 
feature. Played one night to one-half of 
film rental. Moral tone all right and It is 
suitable for Sunday. Had poor attendance. 
Draw family and student class in town of 
4,000. Admission 10-25. R. J. Relf, Star 
Theatre (600 seats), Decorah, Iowa. 

NTH COMMANDMENT. (7,339 feet). Star 
cast. Nobody seemed to know just what 
this was all about, nothing to it; the few 
what turned out were in a maze trying to 
learn what was the object of the story. Moral 
tone good. Had poor attendance. Draw 
miners. Admission 15-25. Charles F. Kear, 
Opera House (460 seats), Minersville, Penn- 
sylvania. 

PURPLE HIGHWAY. (6,574 feet). Star, 
Madge Kennedy. A bit slow here and there 
and as a whole rather below the average. 
Patrons didn't think much of it. Had poor 
attendance. City of 110,000. Admission 10- 
20. Al C. Werner, Royal Theatre, Reading, 
Pennsylvania. 

PURPLE HIGHWAY. (6,674 feet). Star, 
Madge Kennedy. An extra good program 
picture which pleased young and old. We 
are beginning to feel the Easter depression 
due to the many church services which are 
affecting our attendance. Moral tone good. 
Had fair attendance. Draw better class In 
town of 4,500. Admission 10-15. C. A. 
Anglemire, "Y" Theatre, Nazareth, Penn- 
sylvania. 

RUGGLES OF RED GAP. (7,600 feet). Star 



cast. Good picture. Excellent photography, 
wonderful acting. All around good' picture 
for big town. I do not consider it a small 
town picture. Will not please over sixty 
per cent in a small town. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Usual attend- 
ance. Draw town and rural class in town 
of 3,000. Admission 10-25. S. H. Rich, 
Rich Theatre (480 seats), Montpelier, Idaho. 

RUGGLES OF RED GAP. (7,500 feet). Star, 
Ernest Torrence. A good comedy drama but 
hardly a special. Raised my prices to my 
sorrow. Pleased about eighty per cent and 
only drew fair attendance. Moral tone fair 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw farming class in town of 
1,500. Admission 10-30, 25-50. J. A. Harvey, 
Jr., Strand Theatre (280 seats), Vacaville, 
California, 

SHADOWS OF PARIS. (6,549 feet). Star, 
Pola Negri. Nothing very big but pleased a 
large majority and drew my regular Sunday 
attendance. Very well acted and directed. 
Moral tone okay and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw general 
class In town of 800. Admission 10-30. 
Frank G. Leal, Leal Theatre (246 seats), 
Irvington, California. 

SILENT PARTNER. (5,866 feet). Star 
cast. A fair picture. Nothing extra, but 
got us nothing in the way of business. Print 
fair. Moral tone good and it is suitable for 
Sunday. Attendance, no good. Draw all 
classes In town of 2,800. Admission 15-25. 
D. W. Strayer, Mt. Joy Theatre (250 seats), 
Mt. Joy, Pennsylvania. 

SILENT PARTNER. (6,866 feet). Star, 
Leatrice Joy. A good program show. Lea- 
trice Joy Is liked better here in every show 
she appears in. Ttois should be a good show 
where they like society types. Moral tone 
good. Had poor attendance. Draw better 
class in town of 4,500. Admission 10-15. 
C. A. Anglemire, "Y" Theatre (403 seats), 
Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 

SINGED WINGS. (7,788 feet). Star cast. 
A picture that pleased eighty per cent of my 
patrons. Draw rural class in town of 850. 
Admission 10-25, 10-35. W. F. Haycock, 
Star Theatre, Callaway, Nebraska. 

SINGER JIM McKEE. (7,098 feet). Star, 
W. S. Hart. If Will Hays wants to earn 
that $300,000 salary, he needs to lay off his 
regular work and take Bill Hart out into 
the Berkshire Hills and say to him, "Bill, 
take a fall to yourself; forget that you are 
a writer and remember that you are sup- 
posed to be a Western Star and not a Valen- 
tino or a Lionel Barrymore. Quit posing and 
ride the horse; shoot the two-gun (but only 
shoot it six times, then if you want to shoot 
it some more — reload it). Your audiences 
know the limit that a six-gun can be shot 
before you have to put some more cartridges 
in it." In "Wild Bill Kickock" he shot a pair 
of six-guns sixty-seven times, actual count, 
and never reloaded; and how the audience 
hooted. In "Singer Jim McKee" he is not a 
singer, he's a bloomin' little love-bird. Every 
time he comes near either the sheriffs 
daughter or the one he Is supposed to have 
raised, he bills and coos like a little brown 
turtle-dove. He kisses about everything on 
the lot and blamed if he wasn't going to 
kiss the calf in the last reel but the director 
had just come back from lunch and shook 
his head; so Bill kissed the "bootees" a few 




188 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



more times. This picture is the absolute 
limit for mush. If this bird doesn't get the 
mush out of his head and take a fall that 
the audiences expect action and see as much 
of him as they want to see when he's get- 
ting: some place on his paint pony, he'll go 
back into retirement and even the "tall 
grass" houses will want no more of him. 
When they get to kissing baby slippers, hug- 
ging bear skins and taking a smack at every 
female in the picture, every time they show 
up on the screen, that — for a western hero — 
is the curtain (then what they want is to 
see him "kiss the dust"). Arthur E. Han- 
cock, Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, 
Indiana. 

SOCIETY SCANDAL,. (6,433 feet). Star, 
Gloria Swanson. One of the best stories of 
this type we have ever had. Gives Swanson 
a great part and her support is excellent. A 
story of a wife whose actions are misunder- 
stood and a lawyer who expresses his opin- 
ion of her and then falls in love with her. 
An elaborate costumed and mounted story 
that brought overflow crowds. Moral tone 
not so good. Had best attendance. Ben. L 
Morris, Temple Theatre (1,000 seats), Bel- 
laire, Ohio. 

SOUTH OP SUVA. (5 reels). Star, Mary 
Miles Minter. Something different. A little 
shivery in places but the South Sea Island 
scenes seemed to please quite well. Moral 
tone good. Not very suitable for Sunday, 
a little rough. Had quite good attendance. 
Draw small town and country class in 
town of 735. Admission 10-25. Helen Drex- 
ter, Star Theatre (190 seats), Crafton, 
Nebraska. 

STEPHEN STEPS OUT. (5,152 feet). Star, 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Worth absolutely 
nothing to me as a picture. Was substitute 
for "Zaza" when exchange burned, therefore, 
had a good crowd but all were disgusted. 
Worth about $7.50 to me; ashamed to say 
what they charged. Moral tone okay and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw merchants and family class 
In town of 1,800. Admission 20-25-40. J. W 
Watts, Strand Theatre (260 seats), William- 
flton. North Carolina. 

STEPHEN STEPS OUT. (5,152 feet). Star 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. A fairly good pic- 
ture, but son can never expect to excel sire, 
and did not in this one. William Noble 
Rialto Theatre, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

TOO MUCH SPEED. (5 reels). Star, Wal- 
lace Reid. A good comedy, racing drama 
Drew well in spite of nearly Impossible 
roads. Roberts and Ayres fine. Pleased 
ninety per cent. Moral tone okay and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance 
Draw rural and small town class in town 
of 286. Admission 10-25. R. K. Russell 
Legion Theatre (136 seats), Cushing, Iowa. ' 

TO THE LAST MAN. (6,965 feet). Star 
cast. This story is a little bloody, but fol- 
lows the book very closely. In many instances 
uses the same wording as in the book 
Pleased very well here. Not suitable for 
Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw all 
types in town of 1,500. Admission 10-22 C 
Ernest Liggett, Liggett Theatre (600 seats)' 
Madison, Kansas. 

thirty DAYS. (7,788 feet). Star, Wal- 
lace Reid. One of Reid's poorest pictures in 
my estimation. Audience greatly disap- 



Tips Tell the Truth 



pointed as he is a big favorite here. Better 
lay off this one. Moral tone okay and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had large attendance. 
Draw mixed class in town of 4,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25-35. Thomas L Barnett, Finn's 
Theatre (600 seats), Jewett City, Connecticut. 

WHITE OAK. (6,208 feet). Star, Bill 
Hart. This was Hart's good one. Well liked 
by our western fans. Print good. Moral 
tone good but do not think It is suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
small town and country class In town of 735. 
Admission 10-25. Helen Drexter, Star Thea- 
tre (190 seats), Crafton, Nebraska. 

WOMAN WHO WALKED ALONE. (5,947 
feet). Star, Dorothy Dalton. A fifty-fifty 
production. Moral tone fair. Had poor at- 
tendance. Draw small town class in town of 
1,269. Admission 10-25, 25-35. S. G. Harsh, 
Princess Theatre (249 seats), Mapleton, Iowa. 

WOMAN PROOF. (7,687 feet). Star, 
Thomas Melghan. Good entertainment. Would 
not class it as among his best. Moral tone 
okay and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw local and transient class 
In town of 1,200. Admission 10-30. Leo Pet- 
erson, Iris Theatre (600 seats), Belle Fourche, 
South Dakota. 

YOU CANT FOOL YOUR WIFE. (6,703 
feet). Star cast. Catchy title. Picture little 
above the average. Will please at regular 
admission. Moral tone fair, but would not 
advise to show this on Sunday. Had fair at- 
tendance. Draw local and transient class in 
town of 1,200. Admission 10-30. Leo Peter- 
son, Iris Theatre (600 seats), Belle Fouche, 
South Dakota. 

ZAZA. (7,076 feet). Star, Gloria Swanson. 
This picture was on the silly order about half 
way. Pleased them. Paid twice too much for 
this one. I did well to break even. This pic- 
ture was well advertised. Draw general class 
In town of 2,208. Admission 10-36. J. W. 
Griffin, Scotland Theatre (500 seats), Laurin- 
burg, North Carolina. 

ZAZA. (7,076 feet). Star, Gloria Swanson. 
Too much temper. Did not take well here. 
Don't pay too much for it. We did and lost 
money. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Draw common class in town of 
7,500. Admission 10-25. Otis Woodring, Pal- 
ace Theatre (800 seats), Blackwell, Okla- 
homa. 



Pathe 



CALL OF THE WILD. (7,000 feet). Star 
cast. A truly fine picture. No kicks were 
registered on this one. This picture was 
in eight reels but anyone who sees it will 
get so interested in the picture that they 
will not notice the length. The print I got 
was very dirty and scratched. Moral tone 
good and ft is suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw student and family class 
in city of 80,000. Admission 10-20. George 
W. Pettengil, Jr., High School Theatre (1,000 
seats), St. Petersburg, Florida. 

CALL OP THE WILD. (7.000 feet). Star, 
Buck (dog). This with "No Noise" Gang 



Released July 13, 1924 —Now Booking 



CAREY 

jr\ a 

HUNT STROMBERG 
PRODUCTION 




=i -momasori 




HODKINSON 
RELEASE 

Season 1924 -1925 
Thirty first RmRcftis 



comedy for school benefit well liked but not 
as well as "Silent Call." Moral tone okay 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had big at- 
tendance. Draw farming class in town of 
600. Admission 15-25. C. C. Kluts. Glades 
Theatre (200 seats), Moore Haven, Florlda. 

SAFETY LAST. (6,400 feet). Star, Harold 
Lloyd. The best thing Harold Lloyd ever 
done. A scream from start to finish. Ran 
two days, but rained out. Those that saw It 
more than pleased. Moral tone good and It 
is suitable for Sunday. Draw all classes in 
town of 3,000. Admission 10-20-30. W. H. 
Odom, Pastime Theatre (250 seats), Sanders- 
ville, Georgia. 

SAFETY LAST. (6,400 feet). Star, Harold 
Lloyd. A great picture, but print was in ter- 
rible condition. Had several stops. Disgusted 
audience. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
students in town of 2,000. Admission 10-26. 
K. F. Van Norman, Star Theatre (350 seats), 
Mansfield, Pennsylvania. 

SAFETY LAST. (6,400 feet). Star, Harold 
Lloyd. Seven reels of clean comedy and 
thrills. They raised the roof. Everybody 
pleased. Film rental 50 per cent, too high. 
Moral tone fine, but It Is not suitable for 
Sunday. Had poor attendance. Draw small 
town class in town of 1,269. Admission 10-26, 
25-35. S. G. Harsh, Princess Theatre (249 
seats), Mapleton, Iowa. 

VINCINNES. (3 reels). Star cast. Good 
stuff of its kind, but three times too high and 
absolutely no box office picture at all. Poor- 
est we ever had. Stay off of it and save your 
money. Moral tone good and It is suitable 
for Sunday. Had poor attendance. Draw 
small town and country class In town of 800. 
Admission 10-20-25. Firkins & Laws, Crystal 
Theatre (200 seats), Moravia, Iowa. 

WAY OF A MAN. (9,000 feet). Star cast 
Pleased them all. A good Western. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw high farm class in 
town of 5.000. Admission 10-26. E. Lee Dye, 
Olympic Theatre (441 seats), Plalnvlew. 
Texas. 

WHY WORRY. (6 reels). Star, Harold 
Lloyd. Not his best, but pleased the folks. 
Moral tone good and It is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw general 
class In city of 25,000. Admission 18-36. 
Frank J. Franer, Rialto Theatre (700 seats), 
New London, Connecticut. 

WHY WORRY. (6 reels). Star, Harold 
Lloyd. Good. Get it and play it. My house 
was not large enough to hold them on this 
one. Moral tone good. Had good attendance. 
Draw town and rural class In town of 3,000. 
Admission 10-25. S. H. Rich, Rich Theatre 
(480 seats), Montpeller, Idaho. 

WHY WORRY. (6 reels). Star, Harold 
Lloyd. This one may go over big in some 
places but not here, as It did not even regis- 
ter. Perhaps because it followed "Safety 
Last" which was great. If you play it then 
buy it cheap enough so you can be satisfied 
with results. Moral tone good and it Is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
mixed class in town of 4,600. Admission 
10-30. M. C. Kellogg, Homestake Theatre 
(800 seats), Lead, South Dakota. 



Preferred 



APRIL SHOWERS. (6,350 feet). Star cast. 
A fair program picture. Seemed to drag 
Moral tone okay and It is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw family and 
student class In town of 4,000. Admission 
10-25. R. J. Relf, star Theatre (600 seats) 
Decorah, Iowa. 

BROKEN WING. (6,216 feet). Star, Ken- 
neth Harlan. This pleased one hundred 
per cent and what more can you expect from 
any picture? Full of action from start to 
finish. If your audiences like action and 
excitement they will eat this one up. Moral 
tone okay and it is suitable for Sunday Had 
large attendance. Draw mixed class in town 
of 4,000. Admission 10-25-35. Tho.nas L 
Barnett. Finn's Theatre (600 seats), Jewett 
City, Connecticut. 

BROKEN WING. (6.216 feet). Star cast. 
A pleasing fast moving outdoor picture that 
will please your fans and make friends of 
them. Don't raise admission. Moral tone 
okay, but It Is a better picture for week 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



189 



days. Had good attendance. Draw (arming 
class in town of 1,500. Admission 10-30. J. 
A. Harvey, Strand Theatre (280 seats), Vaca- 
ville, California. 

VIRGINIAN. (8,010 feet). Star cast. A 
good western but nothing more. Don't pay 
too Jiuch for this one. Draw small town 
class in town of 6,000. Admission 10-30. 
L. O. Davis, Virginia Theatre (600 seats), 
Hazard, Kentucky. 

Selznick 

BROADWAY BROKE. (6 reels). Star, 
Mary Carr. To those who like the Mary Carr 
type this will appeal but my patrons like 
the peppy type. There were no kicks. It 
will get by. Moral tone okay and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had rotten attendance. 
Draw merchants and family class in town 
of 1,800. Admission 20-25-40. J. W. Watts, 
Strand Theatre (250 seats), Williamston, 
North Carolina. 

COMMON LAW. (8 reels). Star cast. This 
picture is great. Moral fair and it is suitable 
for Sunday in some places. Had great at- 
tendance. Draw all classes in town of 2,000. 
Admission 10-30. H. Loyd, Colonial Theatre 
(400 seats), Post, Texas. 

COMMON LAW. (8 reels). Star cast. A 
picture that pleased but failed to draw. A 
bit slow moving but well made. It will not 
hold up for a special at raised prices. Not 
suitable for Sunday. Draw farming class in 
town of 1,500. Admission 10-30. J. A. Har- 
vey, Strand Theatre (280 seats), Vacaville, 
California. 

PAWNED. (5,000 feet). Star, Owen 
Moore. Seemed to please but was very fan- 
tastic and in poor condition. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw student and educated 
class in town of 2,000. Admission 10-25, reg- 
ular, special, 15-35. K. P. Van Norman, Star 
Theatre (350 seats), Mansfield, Pennsylvania. 

QUICKSANDS. (6,541 feet). Star, Rich- 
ard Dix. Richard Dlx in a Mexican border 
thriller. A really notable cast. Action, con- 
siderably good U. S. cavalry stuff. Good 
comedy touches. Well knit together by di- 
rector. Atmosphere realistic. Decidedly su- 
perior to the dime-novel western type. The 
official review in Moving Picture World gives 
the dope on this very accurately, I think. 
Draw rural class. Had fair attendance on 
account of big banquet. E. L. Partridge, 
Pyam Theatre, Kinsman, Ohio. 

REPORTED MISSING. (7,500 feet). Star, 
Owen Moore. This is a world-beater accord- 
ing to the press book, posters, etc. I had 
heard diversified opinions from people who 
had seen it, so didn't step on it very hard. 
I'd call it just fair. Moral tone fair but it 
is not suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. Draw rural class in town of 400. 
Admission 25-30. E. L Partridge, Pyam The- 
atre (240 seats), Kinsman, Ohio. 

RUPERT OP HENTZAU. (9,400 feet). 
Star, Elaine Hammerstein. To those who 
really like to see something worth looking 
at this is fine. The acting is superb. Not 
for the frivolous. Used threes, ones, heralds, 
photos. Moral tone okay and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
merchants and family class in town of 1,800. 
Admission 20-25-40. J. W. Watts, Strand 
Theatre (250 seats), Williamston, North 
Carolina. 

United Artists 

ONE EXCITING NIGHT. (11,000 feet). 
Star cast, includes Carol Dempster. Im- 
probable story with ghosts, storm scenes and 
trick photography. Entertaining in Its way 
and has a masked person whose mysterious 
Identity is not revealed until the last reel. 
Moral tone not so good, don't think suitable 
for Sunday. Draw town and country class. 
Admission 20-40. Ernest D. Gruppe, Fausto 
Theatre, Isle of Pines, West Indies. 

ROBIN HOOD. (10,000 feet). Star, Doug- 
las Fairbanks. Played two nights at raised 
admission with one show a night. This pro- 
duction pleased everyone. It is a big one 
and no doubt about it. The print gave us 
trouble the first night. Moral tone good. 
Had very good attendance. Draw better 
class in town of 4,600. Admission 10-15. C. 



Report Regularly 



A. Anglemire, "Y" Theatre (403 seats), Na- 
zareth, Pennsylvania. 

ROSITA. (8,800 feet). Star, Mary Pick- 
ford. Very poor business. Town of 5,000. 
Admission 10-20. Fredonia Opera House, 
Fredonia, New York. 

ROSITA. (8,800 feet). Star, Mary Pick- 
ford. A fine picture and after you get through 
try and find the profit. Used everything for 
advertising. Attendance, not what the price 
warranted. Draw health seekers and tour- 
ists. Dave Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beau- 
tiful, Saranac Lake, New York. 

ROSITA. (8,800 feet). Star, Mary Pick- 
ford. Not the type of picture Pickford fans 
like to see this star in. Too long. Gets 
tiresome. Business opened big but fell off 
every day. Gave poor satisfaction. Price too 
high. Town oversold. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had poor attend- 
ance. Draw best class in city of 80,000. Ad- 
mission 25-35. J. B. Osterstock, Colonial 
Theatre, Allentown, Pennsylvania. 

SALOME. (6 reels). Star, Nazimova. 
Terrible. Lay off. Not suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw railroad class 
in town of 2,705. Admission 10-25, 15-30, 
W. C. Witt, Strand Theatre (450 seats), Ir- 
vine, Kentucky. 

WHITE ROSE. (11,000 feet). Star, Mae 
Marsh. D. W. Griffith holds up his former 
reputation In this picture. Miss Marsh does 
some wonderful work. Heart interest story 
that gets under your hide. A knockout. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw town and 
rural class In town of 3,000. Admission 10- 
25. S. H. Rich, Rich Theatre (480 seats), 
Montpelier, Idaho. 

WOMAN OP PARIS. (8,000 feet). Star, 
Edna Purviance. Edna Purviance and Adolphe 
Menjou run away with the picture. Poor 
business first night with gradual increase 
next five days. Very well liked. Had good 
attendance. Draw general class in city of 
23,000. Admission 10-35. Frank Franer, 
Rialto Theatre, New London, Connecticut. 

Universal 

ABYSMAL BRUTE. (7,373 feet). Star, 
Reginald Denny. Keep away from that one, 
very poor story and very poor acting. Peo- 
ple walked out and some of my patrons com- 
mented on this picture. Moral tone poor but 
it is not suitable for Sunday. Had poor at- 
tendance. Draw business class and farmers 
in town of 1,000. Admission 10-25. Leonard 
Falgaut, Raceland Theatre (500 seats), Race- 
land, Louisiana. 

ACQUITTAL. (6,523 feet). Star, Claire 
Windsor. Pleased all of ninety-nine per 
cent of patrons. Good moral tone, suitable 
for Sunday or any time. Good attendance 
of elite class. Admission 20-30-40. Lewis 
Isenberg, Elmwood Theatre (1600 seats), Buf- 
falo, New York. 

BLINKY. (6,740 feet). Star, Hoot Gibson. 
Not so good as "Ramblin' Kid." The desert 
scenes are good but it seems as though the 



army life depicted moves very slowly and 
too many close-ups are used as filler. The 
picture is just fair. Moral tone fair and it 
is possibly suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw rural class in town of 
200. Admission 10-25. D. B. Rankin, Co- 
operative Theatre (200 seats), Idana, Kansas. 

BLINKY. (5,740 feet). Star, Hoot Gibson. 
A few more Hoot Gibsons like this and it's 
good-bye Mary Ann. They should lower price 
on this bunk instead of raising it. Am I 
right? Moral tone fair and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Had good attendance. H. W. 
Mathers, Morris Run Theatre, Morris Run, 
Pennsylvania. 

BREATHLESS MOMENT. (5,556 feet). Star, 
William Desmond. Good crook picture, good 
photography, comedy drama. Moral tone 
fair and it is suitable for "Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw small town and country 
class in town of 400. Admission 10-25. Roy 
E. Cline, Osage Theatre (225 seats), Osage, 
Oklahoma. 

BREATHLESS MOMENT. (5,556 feet). 
Star, William Desmond. A fine program pic- 
ture with plenty of comedy mixed in, also 
plenty of breathless moments. Everybody 
pleased. Draw farmers and business class in 
town of 2,200. Admission 10-25. A. F. Jen- 
kins, Community Theatre (491 seats), David 
City, Nebraska. 

DON O.UICKSHOT OF THE RIO GRANDE. 

Star, Jack Hoxie. Absolutely the best I have 
ever seen of this star and pleased the large 
audience it drew. No mistake in booking this 
one. Has plenty of laughs and thrills. Moral 
tone okay and it Is suitable for Sunday. 
Had average attendance. Draw general class 
In town of 800. Admission 10-30. Frank G. 
Leal, Leal Theatre (246 seats), Irvington, 
California. 

DOUBLE DEALING. (5,705 feet). Star, 
Hoot Gibson. Fair program picture and did 
not excite anyone, but I have used worse. 
Moral tone okay and It Is suitable for Sun- 
day. Attendance, 70. Draw farmers in town 
of 2,500. Admission 10-20, 10-25. H. J. 
Longaker, Howard Theatre (350 seats), Alex- 
andria, Minnesota. 

DRIFTING. (7,394 feet). Star, Priscilla 
Dean. Just a fair program picture which 
pleased only about forty per cent here. If 
the star is liked in your town it will get by. 
Here she does not draw for me at all. 
Moral tone okay and It is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw general 
class in town of 800. Admission 10-30. Frank 
G. Leal, Leal Theatre (246 seats), Irvington, 
California. 

EXCITEMENT. Star, Laura LaPlante. A 
peppy comedy drama with good support. Star 
was the beauty in "Sporting Youth." Added 
International News. Moral tone okay and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw family class in city of 300,000. Admis- 
sion 25-50-75. L D. Balsly, Liberty Theatre 
(1,000 seats), Kansas City, Missouri. 

GALLOPING ACE. (4,561 feet). Star, Jack 
Hoxie. Not as good as most Hoxie's. Uni- 
versal sent me this instead of "Blinky" and 
my patrons were disappointed. Moral tone 
okay and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
small attendance. Draw rural class in town 
of 3,600. Admission 10-25. E. L. Delano. 
Electric Theatre (200 seats), Agra, Kansas. 

HUNCHBACK OP NOTRE DAME. (11,000 
feet). Star, Lon Chaney. Very good pic- 



First Release July 20, 1924— Now Booking 




HER OWN 
FREE WILL" 

Starring 

HeiineCbadwick 



C, HODKINSON Season 1924-1925 
J RELEASE TlnrlyFircl -Run Pictures 



190 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



ture. Long run at advanced prices. Orches- 
tra and prologue. Moral tone good and it 
is suitable for Sunday. Had great attend- 
ance. Draw better class in city of 75,000. 
W. H. Lusher, Raymond Theatre (2,400 seats), 
Pasadena, California. 

HUNTING BIG GAME IN AFRICA. (8 

reels). Martin Johnson's last was so very 
good that it seems unfair to rate anything 
as better, but I thought this one by the 
Snows slightly superior. The expedition was 
described in the December American maga- 
zine so I found the local superintendent of 
schools familiar with the productions and 
entirely willing to announce it at school. 
Personally, it takes a mighty good feature 
to hold my attention as closely as a good 
nature subject like this. Some aren't as crazy. 
Could be chopped to eight to advantage. 
Draw rural class. Had good attendance. 
E. L Partridge, Pyam Theatre, Kinsman, 
Ohio. 

KENTUCKY DERBY. (5,398 feet). Star, 
Reginald Denny. Played two nights. The 
young folks enjoyed this one very much 
and pleased the older folks fairly well also. 
First night good, second night poor attend- 
ance. Moral tone fail. Not suitable for 
Sunday. Draw better class in town of 4,500. 
Admission 10-15. C. A. Anglemire, "Y" Thea- 
tre, Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 

LEGALLY DEAD. (6,076 feet). Star Mil- 
ton Sills. A good program picture. Sills does 
some good work In this picture. Moral tone 
fair, but it is not suitable for 'Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw all classes in town 
of 700. Admission 10-20. William J. Denney, 
Electric Theatre (250 seats), Lowry City, 
Missouri. 

MERRY-GO-ROUND. (9,178 feet). Star, 
Mary Philbin. You will cry and laugh; a 
good drawing card, pleased my patrons one 
hundred per cent. Play it as a special, will 
stand advanced admission. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for any day. Had good 
attendance. Draw business class and farm- 
ers in town of 1,000. Admission 10-25. 
Leonard Falgaut, Raceland Theatre (500 
seats), Raceland, Louisiana. 

MERRY-GO-ROUND. (9,178 feet). Star. 
Mary Philbin. Good picture, but not worth 
the tremendous rental expected. But would 
rather play high-priced good picture than 
cheap-priced trash. Moral tone okay, but 
don't think it suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw neighborhood class in city 
of 65,000. Admission 10-20. S. H. Borlsky, 
American Theatre, Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

MILLION TO BURN. (5 reels.) Star, Her- 
bert Rawlinson. Ordinary. Moral tone okay. 
Had fair attendance. Draw railroad class in 
town of 3,600. Admission 10-25, 15-30. Wil- 
cox & Witt, Strand Theatre, Irvine, Ken- 
tucky. 

MILLION TO BURN. (5 reels). Star, Her- 
bert Rawlinson. A pleasing comedy drama 
that is clean from start to finish. Fact Is, it 
Is refreshing after so many sex problems. 
Moral tone okay and It Is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had average attendance. Draw 
neighborhood class in city of 80,000. Admis- 
sion 10-15. M. F. Meade, Olive Theatre (450 
seats), St. Joseph, Missouri. 



Give Guidance 
Generously 



lng comedy-dramas which gave the same 
general satisfaction her pictures usually do. 
An old Irish woman and her devotion to her 
old pipe offered many laughs. Moral tone 
good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair 
attendance. Draw rural class in town of 
200. Admission 10-25. D. B. Rankin, Co- 
operative Theatre (200 seats), Idana, Kansas. 

OUT OF LUCK. (5,518 feet). Star, Hoot 
Gibson. A very pleasing program, not a 
western, but an exceptionally good navy 
story, very amusing. Pleased our audience 
of Americans and Cubans. Moral tone good. 
Draw Americans and Cubans. Admission 
20-40. Ernest D. Gruppe, Fausto Theatre 
(200 seats), Santa Fe, Isle of Pines, West 
Indies. 

OUT OF LUCK. (5,518 feet). Star, Hoot 
Gibson. The best Gibson feature I have run. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sunday 
show. Had big Saturday attendance. Draw 
all classes in suburban town. Admission 
10-20. C. H. Douglass, Realart Theatre (500 
seats), Los Angeles, California. 

OUT OF LUCK. (5,378 feet). Star, Hoot 
Gibson. Here is a dandy comedy-drama. You 
can offer a premium to anyone seeing this 
one and not laugh at Hoot. Moral tone fair 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance, always with him. Draw all classes 
in town of 700. Admission 10-20. W. J. 
Denney, Electric Theatre (250 seats), Lowry 
City, Missouri. 

PHANTOM HORSEMAN. (4,399 feet). Star, 
Jack Hoxie. Very good Western. Hoxle be- 
coming a favorite Westerner. Moral tone 
okay. Had fair attendance. Draw railroad 
class In town of 3,500. Admission 10-26, 15- 
30. Wilcox & Witt, Strand Theatre, Irvine, 
Kentucky. 

PURE GRIT. (4,571 feet). Star, Roy 
Stewart. A very good western program. 
Moral tone good and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. H. W. Mathers, 
Morris Run Theatre, Morris Run, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

RIDE FOR YOUR LIFE. (5,310 feet). Star, 
Hoot Gibson. Just an average western, not 
as good as we expected. Not many comments 
either way. Moral tone good but it is not 
suitable for Sunday. Had poor attendance. 
Draw farmers and business class in town 
of 2,200. Admission 10-25. A. F. Jenkins, 
Community Theatre (491 seats), David City, 
Nebraska. 

SHOCK. (8,758 feet). Star, Lon Chaney. 
This drew better than we expected. It was 
liked by almost all of our patrons. Chaney's 
work was commented upon. Received an Al 
print from Universal. Had good attendance. 
Draw better class in town of 4,500. Admission 
10-16. C. A. Anglemire, "Y" Theatre (403 
seats), Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 



so you can see what it is although I think 
it got a little better towards the end. Moral 
tone okay and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw mixed class in town 
of 3,000. Admission 10-20. Charles Martin, 
Family Theatre (300 seats), Mt. Morris, New 
York. 

SPORTING YOUTH. (6,712 feet). Star, 
Reginald Denny. Enough comedy to make 
'em laugh now and then. Just enough plot 
to lead up to the greatest auto races ever 
screened with two reels of suspense and ex- 
citement. Unlimited exploitation. You cash 
box will be healthier after showing "Sport- 
ing Youth." Moral tone okay and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Ad- 
mission 10-22. William Meeks, Murray The- 
atre, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

SPORTING YOUTH. (6,712 feet). Star, 
Reginald Denny. An excellent product In 
every particular, it was run here for a Legion 
benefit, and it was a sell out. Therefore, 
can't quote box office values, but the pic- 
ture should do well everywhere. Usual ad- 
vertising brought excellent attendance. 
Draw health seekers and tourists. Dave 
Seymour, Pontiac Theatre Beautiful, Sara- 
nac Lake, New York. 

STOLEN SECRETS. (4,742 feet). Star, 
Herbert Rawlinson. A good crook story and 
all of Rawlinson's features are good. He 
doesn't make many that are not good. Suit- 
able for Sunday. Had good attendance. Draw 
working class in city of 13,000. Admission 
10-20. G. M. Bertling, Favorite Theatre (187 
seats), Piqua, Ohio. 

THUNDERING DAWN. (6,600 feet). Star, 
J. Warren Kerrigan. What we consider a 
pretty fair picture all around. Pleased most 
of them. Good storm scenes. Moral tone 
okay, but it is not suitable for Sunday. Had 
fair attendance. Draw neighborhood class 
in city of 65,000. Admission 10-20. S. H. Bor- 
lsky, American Theatre, Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee. 

THUNDERING DAWN. (6,600 feet). Star, 
J. Warren Kerrigan. The most spectacular 
love drama ever filmed. Gripping, and puls- 
ating. A glamorous love story unfolded amid 
the awe-inspiring furies of crashing storms 
and devasting tidal waves. It will hold you 
entranced and give you the thrill of your 
life. Don't miss it. Both see and book it. 
William Noble, Capitol Theatre, Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma. 

UNTAMABLE. (4,776 feet). Star, Gladys 
Walton. Below the average for a program 
picture. Weak. Good reels. Moral tone fair 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. H. W. Mathers, Morris Run Thea- 
tre, Morris Run, Pennsylvania. 

VICTOR. (4,880 feet). Star. Herbert Raw- 
linson. A comedy-drama that will please 
most all classes of people. A good prize fight 
scene. A good program picture. Moral tone 
fair, but it is not suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw all classes In town 
of 700. Admission 10-20. W. J. Denney, Elec- 
tric Theatre (250 seats), Lawry City, Mis- 
souri. 

VICTOR. (4,850 feet). Star, Herbert Raw- 
linson. This is a fair program picture and 
went over nicely. Had fair attendance. 
City of 110,000. Admission 10-20. Al. C. Wer- 
ner, Royal Theatre, Reading, Pennsylvania. 

Vitagraph 

BORROWED HUSBANDS. Star, Florence 
Vidor. Tnls is a modern picture and Is Inter- 
esting, well photographed and has some 
merit. Personally we liked It, but after ad- 
vertising a "first run" we failed to take In 
film rental on a two-day showing. From the 
box office angle with us that makes the pic- 
ture a failure. Town of 1,022. Admission 10- 
30, 20-40 on specials. H. S. Stansel, Ruleville 
Theatre (240 seats), Ruleville, Mississippi. 

FLOWER OF THE NORTH. (7,130 feet). 
Star cast. This sure Is a good picture, being 
one of Curwood's stories. Pleased all who 
saw It. Moral tone Al. Suitable for Saturday. 
Draw common class In town of 7,600. Admis- 
sion 10-25. Otis Woodring, Palace Theatre 
(800 seats), Blackwell, Oklahoma. 

LEAVENWORTH CASE. (5,400 feet). Star 
cast. Here Is a nice little mystery drama, 
the kind that will please your patrons any 
night in the week. Vitagraph is very fair In 



NEAR LADY. (4,812 feet). Star, Gladys SIX FIFTY. (6 reels). Star, Renee Adoree. 
Walton. This Is another of Walton's pleas- Many people walked out on the second reel 



Coming Soon 



MS? 

Siren sf Seville' 

V, J CHODKINSON Season 1924-1925 

3HJ . ^CT J RELEASE Hiirty First-Run Pictures 




May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



191 



their rentals and all prints are in nice shape. 
Not suitable for Sunday. Had good attend- 
ance. Draw all types in town of 1,500. Ad- 
mission 10-22. Ernest Liggett, Liggett The- 
atre, Madison, Kansas. 

FRONT PAGE STORY. (6,000 feet). Star 
cast. A good program picture. Would not 
rate It as a special. Show it at regular 
prices. Moral tone good and it is suitable 
for Sunday. Draw town and country class 
in town of 800. Admission 10-30. Chas L. 
Nott, Opera House (400 seats), Southerland, 
lows. 

PIONEER TRAILS. (6,920 feet). Star, 
Cullen Landis. A really great picture. I'll 
say as good as the "Covered Wagon," less 
the extras. Had good attendance. Draw 
middle and lower class in city of 50,000. Ad- 
mission fifteen cents. J. Hill Snyder, Scenic 
Theatre (630 seats), York, Pennsylvania. 

PLAYING IT WILD. (5,400 feet). Star, 
William Duncan. Very good western. Moi'il 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
good attendance. Draw rural class in tov, n 
of 250. Admission 15-25-35. J. J. Hailcy, San 
Andreas Theatre (110 seats), San Andreas, 
California. 

ROGUE'S ROMANCE. Star, Rodolph Valen- 
tino. Just a common program picture, but 
sold as a special. This little cave stuff with 
Valentino's flapper scene may make a little 
mni.ey for a few exhibitors, but it cannot 
get me anywhere. Moral tone O. K., suitable 
for Sunday in a few places. Had fair atct-nd- 
ance Draw miners and factory people in 
town of 900. Admission 10-25. Dee Dilling- 
ham, Kozy Theatre (250 seats), Nortonville, 
Kentucky. 

Warner Bros. 

BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED. (7 reels). Star, 
Marie Prevost. Reports have been doubtful 
on this one but it went over good here. We 
received many good comments from our pa- 
trons. Moral tone okay. Had fair attendance. 
Draw all classes in town of 2,000. Admis- 
sion 10-20. Henry Greife, Opera House (450 
seats), Windsor, Missouri. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON, JR. (6 reels). 
Star, Wesley Barry. A good picture. Best 
Wesley Barry has made, but for some rea- 
son or other Wesley fails to draw. Wesley 
out growing his parts. Town of 1,500. Ad- 
mission 10-25. Jake Jones, Coay Theatre (600 
seats), Shawnee, Oklahoma. 

LITTLE JOHNNY JONES. (6 reels). Star, 
Johnny Hines. Splendid comedy drama with 
a good romance woven in. Splendid acting 
by Johnny Hines and "Brownie." Moral tone 
good and it Is suitable for Sunday. Had good 
attendance. Draw all classes in town of 
4,000. Admission 10-20. F. A. Brown, A- 
Mus-U Theatre (300 seats), Frederick, 
Oklahoma. 

PRINTER'S DEVIL. Star, Wesley Barry. 
Another one of Barry's very good pictures. 
It Is good enough for most any house. Has 
good moral tone, suitable for Sunday. Draw- 
ing town and country class, town of 500, had 
good attendance. Admission 10-25. A. F. 
Schreiver, Oneida Theatre (225 seats), Oneida, 
South Dakota. 

PRINTER'S DEVIL. Star, Wesley Barry. 
Weak picture with weak star and did not 
satisfy for us. Second day dropped to noth- 
ing. Not worth much. Direction °.nd photog- 
raphy good but story weak and star a 
has-been. Suitable for Sunday. Had poor 
attendance. Draw all classes in city of 14,000. 
Admission 10-25. E. W. Collins, Liberty The- 
atre (500 seats), Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

TIGER ROSE. (8,000 feet). Star, Lenore 
Ulrlch. Excellent production, scenery espe- 
cially fine. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had poor attendance. 
Draw all classes In city of 15,000. Admis- 
sion 10-35. S. A. Hayman, Lyda Theatre (360 
seats), Grand Island, Nebraska. 

TIGER ROSE. (8,000 feet). Star, Lenore 
Ulrich. A good picture, but did nothing 
here. Town of 1,500. Admission 10-25. Jake 
Jones, Cozy Theatre (600 seats), Shawnee, 
Oklahoma. 

TIGER ROSE. (8,000 feet). Star, Lenore 
Ulrlch. Very good picture and weU acted 
as all Warner pictures are, should be boosted. 
No one walked out on this one. Print In 
good condition. Moral tone fair. Had good 
attendance. Draw all classes in town of 



Send Some 
Soon ! 



4.000. Admission 10-20. F. A. Brown, A- 
Mus-U Theatre (300 seats), Frederick. 
Oklahoma. 

TIGER ROSE. (8.000 feet). 'Star, Lenore 
Ulrich. A fine northwestern story, ably 
acted, splendidly directed and well done 
from every angle. The public did not en- 
thuse over it, but, technically, it is very 
good. Moral tone okay and it Is suitable for 
Sunday. Had ordinary attendance. Draw all 
classes in city of 14.000. Admission 10-25, 
10-35. E. W. Collins, Grand Theatre (700 
seats), Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

WHERE THE NORTH BEGINS. (6,200 
feet). Star, Rin Tin Tin (dog). A fine pic- 
ture. Think it will please any audience. Pa- 
trons liked the picture and said so. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Mrs. 
J. B. Travelle, Elite Theatre, Placerville, 
California. 

WHERE THE NORTH BEGINS. (6,200 
feet). Star, Rin Tin Tin (dog). This is the 
most wonderful dog picture that I ever saw. 
I had more comments on this picture than 
any that I have run for months. Get be- 
hind this one and boost it all you can, and 
that won't be enough. Moral tone good and 
it is suitable for Sunday. Had fair attend- 
ance. George Cain, Frolic Theatre (20 seats). 
Wildrose, North Dakota. 

YOUR BEST FRIEND. (5 reels). Star, 
Vera Gordon. Good in "spots," but too draggy. 
Will just get by. Might go better in larger 
places, but this class of picture always loses 
us money. Too high at any price. Moral 
tone good and is suitable for Sunday. Had 
poor attendance. Draw town and country 
class in town of 800. Admission 10-20-25. 
Firkins and Law, Crystal Theatre (200 seats), 
Moravia, Iowa. 

Comedies 

BUMPS. (EdueatlonnI). Nothing great 
and nothing rotten about this. End has been 
cut off, so it lacked the proper climax, but 
we all know what that would have been. 
Moral tone okay and it is suitable for Sun- 
day. Had excellent attendance. Draw rural 
and small town class in town of 286. Ad- 
mission 1-25. R. K. Russell, Legion Theatre 
(136 seats), Cushtng, Iowa. 

CYCLIST. (Fox). Star, Clyde Cook. Good 
slapstick comedy with a bicycle race that 
had the kids standing up, yelling all the 
way. Played to a fair Tuesday house and 
pleased all present. Sorry did not get this 
one on Saturday as that whirlwind windup 
was certainly great. More like It, Clyde. 
Moral tone okay and It sure is suitable for 
Sunday. Draw mixed class In town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-25, 15-35. H. H. Hedberg, 
Amuse-U Theatre (200 seats), Melville. 
Louisiana. 

FRONT. (Tuxedo-Educational). Holy 
Smoke! The second reel of this one kept 
them in a continual uproar of laughter with 
the hammock scene. A good one from Edu- 
cational. Draw better class. Admission 
10-15. C. A. Anglemire, "Y" Theatre, Naza- 
reth, Pennsylvania. 

INCOME TAX COLLECTOR. (Fox). Not a 

laugh. The poorest of the rotten Sunshine 
comedies. One of the kind that they make 
in a half hour. Moral tone good. J. J. Span- 
dan, Family Theatre, Braddock, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

MY FRIEND. (EdueatlonnI). Star, Lloyd 
Hamilton. One of the best Lloyd comedies 
ever played, and much better than a lot of 
the big stars; got more laughs and com- 
ments than did "Why Worry" and that Is 
saying a lot I think. Moral tone, the best 
and it Is suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw mixed class In town of 
4,500. Admission 10-30. M. C. Kellogg, Home- 
stake Theatre (800 seats). Lead, South 
Dakota. 

POOR BOY. (EduciUionnl). Star, Lloyd 
Hamilton. Fair comedy that will help out 
any program. Nothing extra but It had a 



few laughs in it so can't knock it. Lloyd 
okay. Moral tone fair buit it is not suit- 
able for Sunday. Draw mixed class in town 
of 1,000. Admission 10-25, 15-35. H. H. Hed- 
berg, Amuse-U Theatre (200 sets), Melville, 
Louisiana. 

RICE AND OLD SHOES. (F. B. O.). Best 

DeHaven two reeler we ever played. Few 
good laughs, which is unusual in this brand. 
Moral tone okay. Draw neighborhood class 
in city of 80,000. Admission 10-15. M. F. 
Meade, Olive Theatre (450 seats). St. 
Joseph, Missouri. 

RAINDROPS. (C.inieo-Educationni). Star, 

Jimmie Adams. Our first Cameo comedy and 
it was received with a lot of laughs. If 
the rest are as good as this they seem to be 
a good one reel comedy bet. Draw better 
class. Admission 10-15. C. A. Anglemire, 
"Y" Theatre, Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 

SUNSHINE COMEDIES. (Fox). These 
comedies take well here and sure do get the 
laughs. Should satisfy anywhere. Draw 
farming class in town of 350. Admission 20- 
35. C. W. Mills, Outlook Theatre (200 seats), 
Outlook, Montana. 

TWO WAGONS BOTH COVERED. (Pathe). 

Star, Will Rogers. Positively a mistake to 
play this anywhere the "Covered Wagon" 
hasn't played. Comedy in Itself is poor ex- 
cept to those who have seen the big picture; 
to those it is a knockout. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had poor at- 
tendance. Draw farming class in town of 
1,500. Admission 10-30, 25-50. J.' A. Harvey, 
Jr., Strand Theatre (280 seats), Vacaville, 
California. 

UNCLE SAM. (Mermaid Comedy). Star, 
Lee Moran. This one set them wild. The 
kids darn near went crazy laughing at 
Brownie the dog in this one. The best Mer- 
maid yet. Draw better class. Admission 
10-15. C. A. Anglemire. "Y" Theatre, Naz- 
areth, Pennsylvania. 



Serials 

• '■EASTS OF PARADISE. (Universal). Star, 
William Desmond. This is one of the best 
serials now on the market. Interest holds 
up to last and the action is so plentiful that 
the most rabid of serial fans cannot com- 
plain. William Desmond was star in this 
one but the kids thought more of Joe Bono- 
mo than Desmond. Would advise any of the 
boys who play serials to be sure and book 
this one as it will please anywhere. Moral 
tone okay for serial and there is nothing 
objectionable for running it on Sunday. At- 
tendance, held up good. Draw general class 
in town of 1,000. Admission 10-15, 15-35. 

H. H. Hedberg, Amuse-U Theatre, Melville. 
Louisiana. 

HONEST HUTCH. (Goldwyn). Star, Will 
Rogers. An old picture, inane and uninter- 
esting. Moral tone good. Draw Americans 
and Cubans. Admission 20-40. Ernest D. 
Gruppe, Fausto Theatre (200 seats), Santa Fe, 
Isle of Pines, West Indies. 

WAY OF A MAN. (Pathe). Historical type. 
Will not please If you are looking for sen- 
sational stunt serial. Suits older patrons but 
not the kids. Moral tone okay. Had good 
attendance. Draw all classes in town oC 

I, 000. Admission 10-20-30. C. T. Meisburg, 
Harrodsburg Opera House (600 seats), Har- 
rodsburg, Kentucky. 

Short Subjects 

BIG BOY BLUE. (Unlvrrmil). Star, Billy 
Sullivan. Last of the fourth "Leather Push- 
ers," which went over good. This is one of 
best of series and I am sorry no more 
"Leather Pusher" series are being made. 
Played the entire four series and found 
them to be good. Boys, if you haven't played 
them get busy and book 'em before the 
films are worn out. Moral tone fair. Ques- 
tionable for Sunday because some might ob- 
ject to prize fighting. Draw mixed class In 
town of 1,000. Admission 10-25, 15-35. H. 
H. Hedberg, Amuse-U Theatre (200 seats). 
Melville, Louisiana. 

EDUCATIONAL SUBJECTS. (Fox). They 
are all good, but I don't think they have 
pulled any extra business for me. The Class 
that they might appeal to most are not regu- 
lar "movie" fans. Had poor attendance. 
Draw town and country class in town of 700. 



192 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



Admission 10-25. J. B. Carter, Electric The- 
atre (250 seats), Browning, Missouri. 

FIGHTING BLOOD NEW SERIES. (F. B. 

O.). Star, George O'Hara. Excellent two-reel 
productions, but they have lost money for 
me. In fact business is mighty poor on 
everything. It's a real job to make money 
on anything. Had poor attendance. Draw 
town and country class in town of 700. Ad- 
mission 10-25. J. B. Carter, Electric Theabre 
(250 seats), Browning, Missouri. 

LEATHER PUSHERS. (Universal). Star, 

Reginald Denny. Boys, play all these, first, 
second, third and fourth series. We are play- 
ing last of the third series now. They simply 
pull 'em in. Best drawing card I have had. 
All good pep and ginger in all I have played. 
Moral tone good, but they are not suitable 
for Sunday. Had fine attendance. Draw 
mostly mill people in town of 2,100. Admis- 
sion 11-22. J. B. Stanley, Everybody's The- 
atre (250 seats), McColl, South Carolina. 

PATHE REVIEW. (Pathe). I run these 

every week and find them to be very good. 
1 use these to open up a show and they go 
over okay, as good as any short subject 1 
have ever used for the same purpose. Moral 
tone okay and it is suitable for Sunday. 
Draw mixed class in town of 4,000. Admis- 
sion 10-25-35. Thomas L. Barnett, Finn's 
Theatre (GOO seats), Jewitt City, Connecticut. 

Miscellaneous 

BROKEN SILENCE. (Arrow), atai 
(5,927 feet). Did fair business on this James 
Oliver Curwood picture. Poor direction and 
poor cast. Hardly above the program class. 
Moral tone fair. Had fair attendance. Draw 
high and middle class in city of 12,000. Ad- 
mission 10-40. C. B. Hartwig, Antlers Thea- 
tre (500 seats), Helena, Montana. 

BUTTERFLY RANCH. (Standard). Star. 
Neal Hart. A good picture where action is 
necessary, in five reels. This is an old ti.Tie 
western that will pull 'em in and keep 'em. 
Good moral tone. O. K. for Sunday. Had 
good attendance of miners and factory peo- 
ple from town of 900. Admission, 10-25. Lee 
Dillingham, Kozy Theatre (250 seats), Nor- 
tonville, Kentucky. 

DARING YEARS. (Equity). Star cast. 
(6,782 feet). Only a fair program picture. 
They will stick exhibitors on prices, if you 
listen to the line they hand you. What the 
other man is doing with the picture that's 
not you. Had poor attendance. Draw mixed 
class in town of 2,500. Admission 10-25. 
J. H. Watts, Scotland Theatre (600 seats). 
Laurinburg, North Carolina. 

DEAD OR ALIVE. (Arrow). (5 reels). 
Star. Jack Hoxie. Just a good ordinary 
Western. Will go good with Hoxie fans, but 
not as good as Vniversal's Hoxies. Moral 
tone good, but it is not suitable for Sunday. 
Had fair attendance. Draw small town and 
country class in town of 400. Admission 10- 
25. Roy E. Cline, Osage Theatre (225 seats), 
Osage, Oklahoma. 

DEMPSEY-FIRPO FIGHT. (State Right). 
This picture was good, also print was in 
good shape. Had very few women; mostly 
men. Had very good attendance. Draw all 
classes in town of 800. Admission 10-20. W. 
C. Herndon, Liberty Theatre (250 seats). 
Valiant, Oklahoma. 



DRUMS OF JEOPARDY. (State Right). 
Star, Elaine Hammerstein. In my estimation 
her latest and greatest, as it has a good 
plot. Moral tone okay and it is suitable for 
Sunday.- Had fair attendance. Draw mixed 
class in town of 3,000. Admission 10-20. 
Charles Martin, Family Theatre (300 seats), 
Mt. Morris, New York. 

GOLD MADNESS. (Renown). Star, Guy 
Bates Post. (5,860 feet). The poorest Cur- 
wood we ever used. Miscast. Scenery was 
beautiful. Plot poor. Moral tone fair, but it 
is not suitable for Sunday. Had poor attend- 
ance. Draw general class in town of 1,000. 
Admission 10-25. Welty & Son, Midway The- 
atre (500 seats), Hill City, Kansas. 

FIGHTING STRAIN. (State Rights). Star, 
Xeal Hart. This is a good Western or North- 
west picture. Hart does some good playing, 
although not up to his standard of Westerns. 
I have played 'em all. Not suitable for Sun- 
day. Had good attendance. Draw mostly 
mill people in town of 2,100. Admission 11- 
22. J. B. Stanley, Everybody's Theatre (250 
seats), McColl, South Carolina. 

FLAMING HEARTS. (Independent). Star, 
J. B. Warner. Ordinary program picture. 
Played it one day and starved. Moral tone 
good. Had rotten attendance. J. J. Spandan. 
Family Theatre, Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

HAS THE WORLD GONE MAD? (Equity). 
Star cast. (6,047 feet). Oh, man, how this 
title and advertising did bring them in the 
first night, but how my people did kick as 
they went out. Tne second night's business 
was bad. Personally I believe this is a fairly 
good drama, but my people did not take 
kindly to it. They expected a second "Flam- 
ing Youth," and naturally were disappointed. 
Moral tone fair, but it is not suitable for 
Sunday. Attendance started good, but fell 
down. Draw all classes in small town. Ad- 
mission 10-33. M. W. Larmour, National 
Theatre (450 seats), Graham, Texas. 

KING CREEK LAW. (Photodrama). Star, 
Deo Maloney. Not much of a Western, with 
little action. Nothing to get excited about. 
Suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw working class in city of 14,000. Admis- 
sion 10-20. G. M. Bertling, Favorite Theatre 
(187 seats), Piqua, Ohio. 

LITTLE RED SCHOOL HOUSE. (Arrow). 
Star cast. (5.760 feet). Rotten. Poor busi- 
ness. Don't play it. Moral tone no good and 
it is not suitable for Sunday. Had poor at- 
tendance. Draw mixed class in city of 36,000. 
Admission 25-35. C. D. Buss, Strand Theatre 
(700 seats). Easton, Pennsylvania. 

LUCK. (C. C. Burr). Star, Johnny Hines. 
(6 reels). Good comedy. Suitable for Sun- 
day. Had fair attendance. Draw high class 
in city of 10,000. Admission 10-25. Paul 
Bancroft, Pastime Theatre (500 seats), Cosh- 
octon, Ohio. 

LUCK. (C. C. Burr). Star, Johnny Hines. 
(6 reels). All Johnny Hines' features please 
my patrons, which are of a mixed small town 
type; still they seem to be more critical than 
larger towns. This picture has action, punch 
and pep of the kind that puts it over. Moral 
tone good and it is suitable for Sunday. Had 
very good attendance. Draw mixed class in 
town of 4,500. Admission 10-30. M. C. Kel- 
logg, Homestake Theatre (800 seats), Lead. 
South Dakota. 



LUCK. (C. C. Burr). Star, Johnny Hines. 
(6 reels). A farce comedy running to slap- 
stick. Play it as a comedy feature, but not 
as a story. Did fair business and pleased 
comedy fans. Moral tone okay and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw 
farming class in town of 1.500. Admission 
10-30. J. A. Harvey, Strand Theatre (280 
seats), Vacaville, California. 

MILE A MINUTE MORGAN. (State Right). 
Star cast. Nothing to it. Has not got any- 
thing. Has got a prize fight In it that's a 
joke. Suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw working class in city of 
13,000. Admission 10-20. G. M. Bertling, Fa- 
vorite Theatre (187 seats), Piqua. Ohio. 

MOTHER ETERNAL. (Graphic). Star, 
Vivian Martin. (7,000 feet). A very, very good 
picture. If you care to book good pictures 
you cannot go wrong to buy this one. It will 
please ninety-five per cent. Not a very good 
drawing title, but you can boost this picture. 
It will hold to all you say. Moral tone good 
and it is suitable for Sunday. Had good at- 
tendance. Draw rural and city class in town 
of 1,300. Admission 10-20. A. Kenss. Com- 
munity TTieatre (500 seats). New Athens, 
Illinois. 

PRAIRIE MYSTERY. (5,000 feet). Star 
cast. Very poor picture. No business. R. E. 
Johnston, Lincoln Theatre, Sterling, Illinois. 

TEMPORARY MARRIAGE. (Principal). 

Star, Kenneth Harlan. (7 reels). A good 
program picture. Moral tone okay and it is 
suitable for Sunday. Had fair attendance. 
Draw mixed class in town of 3,000. Admis- 
sion 10-20. Charles Martin. Family Theatre 
(300 seats), Mt. Morris, New York. 

TEMITATION". (C. B. C.) Star. Eva Novak. 
(6,500 feet). A modern jazzy picture of dis- 
contented married folks. Good moral lesson 
via jazz party route. Pleased about ninety- 
five per cent. Moral tone good and it is suit- 
able for Sunday. Had average attendance. 
Draw neighborhood class in city of 80,000. 
Admission 10-15. M. F. Meade, Olive Theatre 
(450 seats), St. Joseph, Missouri. 

TEMITATION. (C. B. C. ) Star, Eva Nova*. 
(6,500 feet). People rather liked this one 
and the comments were favorable. Brought 
fair attendance. City of 110,000. Admission 
10-20. Al. C. Werner. Royal Theatre, Read- 
ing, Pennsylvania. 

UNKNOWN PURPLE. (Truart). Star cast. 
(6,950 feet). Very good for its kind. Suitable 
for Sunday. Had fair attendance. Draw all 
classes in city of 10,000. Admission 10-20. 
Jos. S. Rapalus. Majestic Theatre (850 seats), 
Easthampton, Massachusetts. 

VALLEY OF LOST SOULS. (State Right). 
Star cast. Ordinary program picture of the 
northwoods. Moral tone good, but it is not 
suitable for Sunday. Had good attendance. 
Draw small town and country class In town 
of 400. Admission 10-25. Roy E. Cllne, Osage 
Theatre (225 seats), Osage, Oklahoma. 

WESTERN FEIDS. (Arrow). Star, Edwin 
Cobb. If this fellow is an actor then so am 
I. Can't see him at all. Don't do anything 
and couldn't if tried. Suitable for Sunday. 
Had good attendance. Draw working class 
in city of 13.000. Admission 10-20. G. M. 
Bertling, Favorite Theatre (187 seats), Piqua, 
Ohio. 




Scenes from "Trouble Brewing," Larry Semon's latest comedy for Vitagraph. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE W OR. I D 



193 



EAST and WEST claim this Best 
Comedy Bet of the Season 

NEW YORK CITY 

New York Tribune Morning Telegraph 

"The 'Galloping Fish' is one of the "Would make a censor laugh right 
funniest pictures we ever saw, and out loud — 'Galloping Fish' is a 
reason we didn't scream was because comedy winner. If you want to 
we had a sore throat." laugh out loud, trot down and see 

this." 

LOS ANGELES 

Sunday Times 

"So far as I am concerned, the high point of entertainment in the movies 
is 'Galloping Fish.' My vocabulary is too limited to express my huge 
delight over this picture." — Helen Klumph. 




3xrAt national 9ictureA 



The Shot 

that was 

heard 

Round 
theWorld 

was fired in 
1776 • Bui 
that was 
he fore 





RE WORLD 



May 10. 1924 





Scenes from the forthcoming F. B. O. release, "A Woman Who Sinned," a Finis Fox 
production, starring Mae Busch, Irene Rich and Morgan Wallace. 

Will Hays Tells Pen Women 
Scenario Needs of Industry 



THE scenario needs of the industry were 
discussed last week by representatives 
from the scenario departments of a 
number of producing companies, who at- 
tended the annual meeting in Washington, 
D. C, of the League of American Pen 
Women. The moving picture, from the stand- 
point of the author and scenario writer, 
was discussed during the sessions, with a 
view to bringing about a closer and more 
intimate contact between the writer and 
the scenario department. 

Unable to attend the convention in per- 
son, Will H. Hays, president of the Motion 
Picture Producers and Distributors of 
America, sent a letter to Miss Laura Thorn- 
borough, of the motion picture department of 
the league, setting forth the organization's 
attitude on the scenario question. This let- 
ter was read to the league by Col. Jason 
Joy, of the committee on public relations. 

Mr. Hays declared that the idea which 
prevails that the industry does not want 
stories written especially for the screen 
but prefers stories that have made a hit in 
book form or on the stage is mistaken; that 
the scenario from the unknown author is 
scanned as carefully as that from the most 
famous. But before submitting scenarios, 
authors who have had no screen experience 
should carefully mold their stories so that 
they may be adapted to picturization. Even 
authors who have made a national reputa- 
tion by their stories or plays often fail to 
produce a workable scenario. 

"Not one in each thousand so-called orig- 
inal stories offered for picturization is really 
picturable, I am told," Mr. Hays wrote, "and 
that is because the author has not troubled 
to learn screen requirements." 

Mr. Hays, for the guidance of the pen- 



women, also stressed the fact that many 
things that "get by" in print or on the stage, 
are not acceptable for the screen. 

"Our association is determined,'' he said, 
"to do everything possible to prevent the more 
or less prevalent type of book from making 
any serious inroad toward becoming the 
prevalent type of picture; to try to make 
certain that there is recognition of the fact 
that that which may be produced in a spoken 
drama, or written in a book or newspaper, 
in many instances cannot be made the sub- 
ject matter of a motion picture; to try to 
make certain that only books or stories art- 
used which are of the right type for screen 
presentation; to avoid the picturization of 
books or plays which can be produced only 
after such changes as to leave the producer 
subject to the charge of deception; and to 
avoid using titles which are indicative of a 
kind of picture which could not be pro- 
duced, or by their suggestiveness seek to 
obtain attendance by deception, a thing 
equally reprehensible." 



Clever F. B. O. Boys! 

Frank Leonard and Louie Kramer of the 
Film Booking Office's publicity and exploita- 
tion staff again pulled the army tie-up stunt 
this week for F. B. O.'s Emory Johnson spe- 
cial, "The Spirit of the U. S. A." The stunt 
was repeated in the heart of Manhattan's 
Great White Way. This time, however, 
Louie and Frank went the army one better. 
They got the government, in addition to 
flaring powerful searchlights on F. B. O. 
banners, to go 50-50 on the printing ex- 
penses of circulars which exploited the pic- 
ture in big type and made mention of the 
recruiting on the back. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



195 



Eastern Missouri and Southern Illinois 
Merged Into One Body at Convention 



THE motion picture theatre owners of 
Eastern Missouri and their brethren 
in Southern Illinois merged into one 
body, *.o be known henceforth as the Motion 
Picture Theatre Owners of Eastern Mis- 
souri and Southern Illinois, at a convention 
held in the Elks Club Hall, St. Louis, Mo., 
on Tuesday, April 22. The new body will 
be affiliated with the Motion Picture Thea- 
tre Owners of America, and resolutions 
pledging unwavering and steadfast support 
to the national organization were passed 
unanimously. National President Sydney S. 
Cohen was also roundly praised in suitable 
resolutions put through without a dissent- 
ing vote. 

I. W. Rodgers, Poplar Bluff, Mo., and 
Cairo, 111., theatre owner, was selected as 
president of the new body. He was former- 
ly president of the Motion Picture Theatre 
Owners of Eastern Missouri and was picked 
for that place a year ago with a view of his 
fitness to fill the chair as the head of a joint 
body representing exhibitors of both East- 
ern Missouri and Southern Illinois, as he 
has theatres in both territories. Heretofore 
the Southern Illinois exhibitors were part of 
the Illinois state body, but Chicago was so 
far away the national organization consid- 
ered it best to give the Eastern Missouri 
body jurisdiction over that section of Illinois 
south of the Chicago film zone, especially in 
view of the fact that the exhibitors of that 
territory obtained film from St. Louis and 
in other ways had interests identical with 
those of the Eastern Missouri exhibitors. 

The other officers selected were: First 
vice-president, John F. Rees, Wellsville, Mo.; 
second vice-president, W. W. Watts, Spring- 
field, 111.; third vice-president, Charles G. 
Goodnight, De Soto, Mo.; fourth vice-presi- 
dent, J. C. Hewitt, Robinson, 111.; fifth vice- 
president, F. E. Yemm, Duquoin, 111. 

L. C. Hehl, manager of the Woodland The- 
atre, St. Louis, who resides at 3242 South 
Jefferson avenue, St. Louis, was re-elected 
as secretary, while Fred Wehrenberg, owner- 
manager of the Melba and Cherokee thea- 
tres, St. Louis, continues as treasurer for 
the merged body, having filled those posts 
for the Eastern Missouri organization, while 
W. O. Reeves of St. Louis is sergeant-at- 
arms. 

The executive committee as selected is 
representative of the St. Louis, Eastern Mis- 
souri and Southern Illinois exhibitors, being 
as follows: Spyros Skouras, St. Louis, Mo.; 
H. M. E. Pasmezoglu, St. Louis; J. L. Calvin, 
Washington, Mo.; Joseph Mogler, St. Louis; 
William McNamara, Virden, 111.; R. H. 
Clarke, Effingham, 111.; S. E. Pertle, Jersey- 
ville, 111. 

Delegates to the national convention in 
Boston, Mass., on May 27, 28 and 29, were 
named as follows : From Missouri, H. M. E. 
Pasmezoglu, St. Louis; Robert Stempflc, 
St. Charles, Mo.; Joseph Mogler, St. Louis; 
Fred Wehrenberg, St. Louis; Spyrus Skou- 
ras, St. Louis; I. W. Rodgers, Poplar Bluff, 
J. L. Calvin, Washington, and Fred N. 
Hoelzer, St. Louis. From Southern Illinois, 
S. E. Pertle, Jcrseyville; W. W. Watts, 
Springfield; F. E. Yemm, Duquoin; H. T. 
Loeper, Springfield; O. L. Kern, Buckner; 
Robert Clusterm, Belleville; F. S. Russell, 



Shelbyville; Steve Farrar, Harrisburg; John 
Marlowe, Herrin, and Walter Thimmig, 
Duquoin. 

The attendance at the gathering was very 
good approximately 100 exhibitors from 
Eastern Missouri and Southern Illinois be- 
ing on hand, while the banquet at noon time 
which was addressed by Lieutenant Governor 
Hiram Lloyd of Missouri; Elliott Dexter, 
star of "By Divine Right," (F. B. O.) and 
Assistant Building Commissioner Christobcl 
was attended by many other exhibitors and 
representatives of the various exchanges in 
St. Louis. 

The business of the convention moved 
forward with speed and utmost smoothness, 
there being no friction and little time con- 
sumed on incidentals. The matters taken up 
related strictly to the exhibitors' vital prob- 
lems. The general view was to work out 
these questions in a manner equitable to all 
interests involved. Joseph Mogler. vice- 
president of the Motion Picture Theatre 
Owners of America, told of the efforts now 
being made to solve the music tax problem 
and to eliminate the theatre seat tax and 
the tax on admissions up to 50 cents. In this 
connection a resolution was passed com- 
mending the national organization for its 
work and another directing exhibitors of 
the territory to get in touch with their Con- 
gressmen and Senators and urge a favorable 
vote on the measure designed to solve the 
taxes not cutting so deeply into the revenues 
of the motion picture theatre owners of the 
country. 

Lieutenant-Governor Lloyd declared him- 
self in favor of permitting the general pub- 
lic to act as its own censors, instead of some 
board of super-citizens passing on all pic- 
tures. He said that he could not see why 
a board of censors in New York or Ohio 
should dictate the kind of pictures the peo- 
ple of St. Louis or Southern Illinois should 
view. 

"I don't mean to say that there should be 
no censorship," he continued. "There are 
some pictures which should be suppressed. 
But we should not legislate so as to handi- 
:ap the citizens of another state. We have 
passed that day of isolation. What happens 
in New York is known in San Francisco 
within a few minutes. There should be co- 
operation in the laws regulating motion pic- 
tures. 

"The motion picture industry has brought 
us an amusement not costly and in the main 
instructive. I don't think the movies have 
caused any divorces. On the contrary, I 
think that they have kept more than one 
married man straight. 

"The motion picture theatre owners can be 
relied upon to do the right thing. I know, 
probably because they know that that is the 
best course for them. But nevertheless they 
can be relied upon to do the right thing no 
matter what the motive is behind their ac- 
tions." 

Dexter made a brief talk touching on his 
experiences in the movies and the strides 
made by the industry. Christobel compli- 
mented the motion picture theatre owners of 
St. Louis for the co-operation they have 
given to the city's building department in safe- 
guarding the picture fans. He touched on 



the advance of the industry from the tent 
show days to the present time, when St. 
Louis has picture palaces that compare favor- 
ably with any theatres throughout the whole 
world. 

President I. W. Rodgers acted as toast- 
master at the banquet and introduced the 
various speakers. Lieutenant Governor Lloyd 
made a big hit with the exhibitors present. 
He recently announced himself as a candidate 
for the Republican nomination for Governor 
subject to the primary elections next 
August, and in some quarters is considered 
the best bet for the head of the next Mis- 
souri administration. Needless to say the ex- 
hibitors of Eastern Missouri and elsewhere 
throughout the state would not be opposed to 
a governor entertaining so fair views on the 
question of censorship and other matters 
vital to the interest of the exhibitors as 
does Lloyd. More than one of those who 
heard his talk can be banked upon to cast 
their votes for him next August. 

The theatre owners and managers who 
registered for the convention of the Eastern 
Missouri and Southern Illinois Motion Pic- 
ture Theatre Owners convention at the Elks 
Club, St. Louis, Tuesday, April 22, included: 

I. W. Rodgers, Cairo, 111., and Poplar Bluff, 
Mo.; W. W. Watts, Springfield. 111.; H. T. 
Leoper, Springfield, 111.; P. L. Kern. Buckner, 
111.; N. A. Culbreath, Carthersville, Mo.; 
Charles G. Goodnight, Desto, Mo.; W. O. 
Reeves, St. Louis; C. C. Craven, Lilburne, 
Mo.; John Beler, New Madrid, Mo.; Noah 
Bloomer, Belleville, 111.; F. E. Schmitt, Po- 
cahontas, III.; H. Imming, Newton, III.; R. 
H. Clarke. Effingham, 111.; H. R. Rosendohl, 
Cutler, 111.; L. C. Hehl, Woodland Theatre, 
bt. Louis; J. P. Meehan, St. Louis; Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Hull, Dupo, 111.; J. L. Calvin, Wash- 
ington, Mo.; C. H. Horseman. Chaffee, Mo.; H. 
A. Robinson, Oran, Mo.; Joe Hewitt, Rob- 
inson, 111. 

F. S. Russell, Shelbyville, 111.; A. J. 
Moeller, New York, N. Y.; R. E. Atkins, 
Elksv.lle, 111; Joe Ogolini, Dowell, 111.; F. E. 
Yemm, Duquoin, 111.; A. Keuss, New Athens, 
111.; S. E. Pertle, Jerseyville, 111.; F. Calhoun, 
St. Louis; William McNamara, Virden, 111.; F. 
Robinson, Irma Theatre, St. Louis; Charles 
Goldman, Rainbow Theatre, St. Louis; Frank 
Spyros, Marquette Theatre, St. Louis; Harry 
Nash and Mike Nash, King Bee Theatre, St. 
Louis; J. F. Rees, Wellsville, Mo.; O. Lehr, 
Rex Amusement Company, St. Louis; Richard 
Stempfle, St. Charles, Mo.; C. R. Wahl, Wood- 
river, 111. 

A.W. Worcester, Woodriver, III.; A. M. Beare, 
Chester, 111., Charles Warner, St. Louis, Mo.; 
H. Levy H.ghland, 111.; J. P. Wagner, Ameri- 
can, St. Louis; J. Kotnik, McNair, St. Louis; 
Harry Norack, Hudson Theatre, St. Louis; J. 
Geegan, Hudson Theatre, St. Louis; Spyros 
Skooras, Grand Central Theatre and St. Louis 
Amusement Company, St. Louis; George 
Meyer, Capitol Theatre, St. Louis; J. H. 
Blowitz and A. D. Pappas, Virginia Theatre, 
St. Louis; Gus Kerasotas, Springfield, 111.; 
Mrs. A. L. Ketchum, New Aubert, Plaza and 
Chippewa theatres, St. Louis, Mo.; Tommy 
James, Comet Theatre, St. Louis; H. M. E. 
Pasmezoglu, Delmar, Congress and Criterion 
theatres, bt. Louis. 

S. Hoiwitz, Red Wing Theatre, St. Louis; 
Fred Heelzer, Ivory and Marguerite theatres, 
St. Louis; W. K. Sine, Springfield, 111.; James 
J. Reilly, Princess Theatre, Alton, 111.; Tom 
Reed, Duquoh, 111.; Bob Cluster, Belleville 
and Johnston City, 111.; J. A. Seipker, Web- 
ster Groves, Mo.; F. B. Harris, Maplewood, 
Mo.; John Walsh, St. Louis; Maury Stahl, 
Pageant Theatre, St. Louis; J. Brinkmeyer, 
Grand-Florissant, St. Louis; O. L. Becker, 
111.; Julius Mueller, Creve Coeur, Mo.; Chris 
Eftheim, Sar Theatre, St. Louis, and Joe 
Walsh, Bridge Theatre, St. Louis. Every 
film exchange In St. Louis was represented 
at the banquet at noon. 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



The Shot 

that was 
heard 

Round 

the World" 

was fired in 
Y176 * Bui 
that was 
he fore 





JBBr-' 




ww 



Scenes from "Hold Your Breath," a Christie comedy released by W. W. Hodkinson 
Corporation. Dorothy Devore is featured. 



Big Exploitation Campaign 

'Spirit of the U. S. A. 



on 



99 



THE Film Booking Offices announce 
the definite release date of Emory 
Johnson's fifth production, "the Spirit 
of the U. S. A.," co-starring Mary Carr and 
Johnnie Walker, will be May 12. F. B. O. 
already has started its high-pressure adver- 
tising and exploitation campaign on the big 
Johnson feature, which promises to be one 
of F. B. O.'s best box-office attractions of 
the year. 

The initial stunt on "The Spirit of the 
U. S. A." was a recruiting tie-up with the 
212th Artillery, Anti-Aircraft, of the New 
York National Guard. An encampment was 
held in Times Square, more than 1,000 sol- 
diers, 400 horses and riders, motor lorries, 
tanks, machine guns and other equipment 
of modern warfare taking part in the stunt. 
Banners advertising the forthcoming John- 
son production were tied onto the motor 
lorries and tanks and carried by the regi- 
mental band, 35,000 heralds advertising "The 
Spirit of the U. S. A." on one side, and the 
212th Artillery on the other were distrib- 
uted by the soldiers. 

The stunt on Times Square was the start 
of the exploitation campaign in New York 
City and throughout the country. The same 
thing will be repeated in all parts of New 
York City. Four parades, down Broadway, 
are also scheduled for the near future. 

Another interesting feature of F. B. O.'s 
stunt is that the various commanders have 
indicated they are willing to help first runs 
and subsequent runs in repeating the re- 
cruiting stunt. In addition to this, they will 
lend the theatres all kinds of war parapher- 



nalia, guns, gas masks, wagons, horses and 
a thousand and one things that an exhib- 
itor can use as a lobby display for ballyhoo 
purposes. 

Another thing that will help exhibitors in 
securing the co-operation of National Guard 
commanders is the fact that the huge battle 
scenes were filmed with the complete co- 
operation of the U. S. Government at the 
army reservation in San Francisco, the Pre- 
sidio, while more than 600 feet of battle 
scenes were contributed by the war depart- 
ment, the scenes having been filmed by 
doughboys under fire in France. These pic- 
tures have never before been shown on a 
screen. 



"Being Respectable" Cast 

Warner Brothers announce completion of 
the cast for "Being Respectable," from 
Grace Flandrau's novel. Marie Prevost and 
Monte Blue head the list of players, which 
includes Louise Fazenda, Irene Rich, Frank 
Currier, Eulalie Jensen, Kenneth Gibson and 
Lila Leslie. 



Fox Changes Title 

Fox announces that "Romance Ranch" 
has been selected as the final title for the 
latest John Gilbert attraction which is be- 
ing produced at the Fox West Coast Studios 
under the working title of "Colorau." This 
program picture is scheduled for release in 
June. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



197 



Constructive Business Sessions to 

Feature Theatre Owners' Convention 



REPORTS made at the joint session of 
the National Convention Committee 
and the Massachusetts Committee in 
Boston this week showed that very gratify- 
ing advances were recorded on the matter of 
arranging for the national meeting of the 
Motion Picture Theatre Owners of America, 
which will be held in that city on May 27, 
28 and 29. 

National President Sydney S. Cohen, 
Chairman M. E. Comerford of the Convention 
Committee, Dave Adams, president of the 
New Hampshire Motion Picture Theatre 
Owners, State President E. M. Fay of the 
Rhode Island theatre owners, William Ca- 
doret of Illinois, M. J. O'Toole and others 
represented the national organization, and 
State President Jacob Lourie, of the Massa- 
chusetts theatre owners, Harry Wasserman, 
chairman of the Massachusetts Convention 
Committee; Ernest Horstman, the executive 
secretary, and a large number of theatre 
owners from Boston and other cities made 
reports on the detail convention arrange- 
ments. 

The following members of the Massa- 
chusetts organization and Convention Com- 
mittee were also in attendance: Patrick F. 
Lydon of South Boston, Joseph Woodhcad 
of Clinton, A. Locatelli of Lexington, Al 
Somersby, Stanley Sumner, Charles H. Ross, 
Moe Silver, Charles W. Hodgdon, Phillip 
Markell and Philip Smith of Boston; Frank 
J. Howard of Brookline, Nathan Yamins of 
Fall River, William E. Dowlin of East Bos- 
ton, Gordon Wrighter of Springfield and 
Elmer R. Daniels of Worcester. 

President Cohen reported that thirty-one 
states already have reported to the national 
headquarters in the matter of being repre- 
sented at the convention, a big advance over 
previous years one month before the con- 
vention date, and that this presaged a con- 
vention in Boston which would surpass all 
previous efforts of the organization in this 
connection. He reported that unusual enthu- 
siasm prevailed respecting the advances made 
in the matter of national legislation, 
especially that directed toward the repeal 
of the Seat and Admission Taxes and the 
modification of the Copyright Laws to set 
aside the Music License Tax. The amount 
of money saved theatre owners in this rela- 
tion, he said, would total millions of dollars 
annually and exhibitors generally now 
realized that this and other forms of sub- 
stantial advancement would have been im- 
possible without the concerted theatre owner 
power exerted through national organization. 
Mr. Cohen also reported briefly on the gen- 
eral condition of organization in the nation, 
all phases of which will be presented in 
detail by him at the national convention. 

Joseph W. Walsh, president of the Con- 
necticut theatre owners, reported the co-_ 
operation of the three owners of his state 
in the convention activities, and E. M. Fay, 
president of the Rhode Island organization, 
and Dave Adams, of the New Hampshire 
unit, reported similarly. 

National Director M. E. Comerford made 
a pointed address on the work of oragniza- 
tion generally, in which he pointed out the 
many difficulties with which theatre own- 
ers are forced to contend and urged that a 
compact business organization was very 



essential to the growth and development of 
the exhibitor's business. 

The convention sessions will open on Tues- 
day morning, May 27, at 10 :30 o'clock 
promptly in the main banquet hall of the 
Copley Plaza Hotel. Special conveniences 
for the theatre owners in this relation have 
been provided by Manager Fogg of the 
hotel. The delegates will occupy the main 
floor of the hall and visitors will be accom- 
modated on the spacious balconies. 

Governor Channing H. Cox of Massa- 
chusetts and Mayor James W. Curley of 
Boston will formally welcome the delegates 
on behalf of state and city. Responses will 
follow and then the detail work of the con- 
vention will commence at once. On account 
of the vast amount of work to be handled 
there, a session may be held on Tuesday 
night. 

The convention banquet will be held in the 
same room on Wednesday night and the con- 
cluding sessions of the convention on Thurs- 
day. It was definitely decided to confine the 
entire work of the convention to business 
matters and no contribution of money will 



RECENTLY the writer was in receipt o: 
an invitation extended by Mr. G. C. 
Ziliotto, New York City, to view a new 
panoramic motion picture camera, the in- 
vention of Mr. Filoteo Alberini, of Rome, 
Italy — the man who, I am advised, opened 
the first motion picture theatre in Italy, and 
who is responsible for a number of inven- 
tions relating to the motion picture industry. 

In the past I have not been at all en- 
thusiastic about panoramic motion pictures, 
because of the fact that special apparatus 
was required to project them and because of 
the further fact that an extra width was re- 
quired in the projected picture. This latter 
was, as I saw the matter, highly undesirable 
in a very large proportion of our theatres in 
which the front rows of seats were and are 
quite close to the screen. 

What Mr. Ziliotto asked me to look at, 
however, seemed to be something else again. 
Apparently he proposed panoramic pictures 
with ordinary projectors and the regular 
width projected picture, so I went down 
and looked the thing over. Here h what I 
found : 

The invention of Mr. Alberni provides 
for the taking of motion pictures, including 
any desired angle irrespective of the focal 
length of objective used in the camera. It 
amounts literally to taking panoramic pic- 
tures at any desired rate of speed. And 
when I say "panoramic pictures," I mean 
exactly that. The objective pivots when the 
picture is being taken, the film passing be- 
fore the lens in a curve — the segment of a 
circle — and the lens swings in front of it. 

Reciprocal motion? No! Not at all. 
That would be impractical. The lens swings 
in a complete circle. In other words it 
whirls around endwise sixteen or more times 



be asked, as the matter of financing the 
affairs of the organization will be covered 
in committee reports. 

The management of the Copley Plaza Hotel 
reports that many reservations have already 
been made and it is essential that theatre 
owners make arrangements along these lines 
as soon as possible. 

Entertainment features will surpass ail 
previous efforts and this is made possible 
because of the varied elements of interest 
in and around Boston associated with early 
American history, the beautiful harbor and 
other points which have a special appeal to 
all. The Massachusetts committee has pro- 
vided lines of entertainment which will take 
up all of the spare time of the delegates 
and visitors. 

The City of Boston, through the courtesy 
of Mayor Curley, has arranged a harbor 
trip on city steamships which will cover a 
radius of over fifty miles, during which time 
all the city fire boats in full action will circle 
around the other ships. Trips on land to 
Bunker Hill, Lexington, Concord and other 
points have also been arranged. 



per second, being "open" to the curve of the 
film every time its business end comes be- 
fore it. 

The negative film is wider than standard, 
its width being dependent upon the angle it 
is wished to include with a lens of given 
focal length. Using a 35 millimeter focal 
lens and limiting the angle to 65 degrees, 
the over-all width of the negative will be 
just two inches. The negative picture will 
be 1%" wide by one inch high. In th<: 
process of printing the dimensions will be 
reduced to fit standard film, so that the 
panoramic picture may be projected with 
the ordinary projector without any change 
whatsoever. The picture will, under this 
condition, be the same as the regular pic- 
ture, except that its height will be 3/5 of 
the width, instead of 34. However, the re- 
maining space in the frame, above and be- 
low the picture, will be printed opaque, so 
that that is alright. 

By this process the close-up feature is 
retained, together with the wide field as a 
background. We shall therefore have a true 
panoramic picture, taking in any desired 
width of scene, projected to fit the present 
theatre screen by the present projectors, and 
that's that. I saw positive film and it cer- 
tainly looked sharp and first class in every 
way, so far as I could judge without actual 
projection. The projection I expect to view 
shortly. 

In my opinion Mr. Alberini's invention will 
find a place in the industry. 



P. C. Taylor Joins F. B. 0. 

P. C. Taylor has resigned as sales man- 
ager in Canada for Universal to accept posi- 
tion as general manager in Canada for 
F. B. O. 



Panoramic Motion Pictures 
a Success with New Invention 

F. H. RICHARDSON 



198 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 




FILOTEO ALBERINI 
President of Maidina Pictures, Inc. 

Enters American Field 



Alberini, Italian Pioneer, Heads New 
Maidina Pictures, Inc. 

An event of significance to both the mo- 
tion picture industry and the general public 
is the arrival in this country of Comm. 
Filoteo Alberini of Rome. 

The Commendatore is internationally 
known as a pioneer of the cinema. He is 
credited as being among the first to give a 
commercial impulse to the cinematograph 
in Europe by opening one of the first houses 
for the presentation of pictures at popular 
prices in the city of Florence. Italy, in 1898. 

He founded the Cines Company of Rome 
and was its technical director. He is now 
president of Maidina Pictures, Inc., a re- 
cently organized corporation, of which he is 
also technical director. 



SantelPs Second 

Al Santell's new production for Film 
Booking Offices, "Fools in the Dark," star- 
ring Matt Moore and Patsy Ruth Miller, 
has been completed at the F. B. O. Holly- 
wood studios. It is Santell's second produc- 
tion for the distributing company, his other 
being the successful "Lights Out," from the 
Broadway stage hit by Paul Dic'<ey and 
Mann Paige. The new production was 
based on an original story by Bertram Mill- 
hauser. In the cast are Bertram Grasby, 
Charles Belcher and Tom Wilson. 



Reports Gains in Sales 

Vitagraph's Big Drive for Summer 
Business Showing Results 

Vitagraph's ten-week drive for summer 
business in all exchanges is now in its third 
week. Gains in all territories are being re- 
ported. John B. Rock, general manager, 
upon his return from a flying visit to the 
Middle West and Northwest, announced his 
great satisfaction at the results in the ter- 
ritories he visited. 

Four specials are to be released by Vita- 
graph this summer, "Borrowed Husbands,'' 
"Between Friends," "The Code of the Wil- 
derness," and "The Strength of Desire." In 
these pictures the exhibitor is getting brand 
new productions for summer runs. "Be- 
tween Friends" will have its Broadway 
premiere at the Rivoli Theatre on May 11, 
and "Borrowed Husbands'' will have a 
Broadway run shortly after. David Smith, 
producer for Vitagraph, is now finishing 
"The Code of the Wilderness," picturized 
from the novel by Charles Alden Seltzer, 
and J. Stuait Blackton is in the last week 
of shooting "The Strength of Desire," adapt- 
ed from the novel by E. Phillips Oppenheim. 

In addition to these Vitagraph specials 
Whitman Bennett's "Virtuous Liars," a so- 
ciety drama, and "One Law for the Woman," 
a thrilling melodrama adapted by Charles E. 
Blaney from his famous stage play, are open 
for booking dates. 



Larry Semon's Latest 

Larry Semon plays a comedy dry agent in 
his newest release by Vitagraph, "Trouble 
Brewing," and manages to poke a lot of in- 
nocent fun at the situations which the en- 
forcement act has produced throughout the 
country, according to published reports. He 
has as a foil Babe Hardy and his leading 
woman is Carmelita Geraghty. Bill Hauber, 
Al Thompson and Pete Gordon contribute 
to the fun. Semon has created new gags 
and marvelous thrills in this newest offer- 
ing. This is the fourth of the Larry Semon 
comedies offered to the exhibitor by Vita- 
graph this year. 



Rialto Books "Maytime" 

Max Roth, general sales manager for Pre- 
ferred Pictures Corporation, announces that 
B. P. Schulberg's production, "Maytime," 
has been boo<ed by Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld for 
the Rialto Theatre. 

This picturization of Rida Johnson Young's 
play, which won phenomenal popularity 
through seven years of presentation on the 
tage, has been meeting with great success 
in all cities where it has opened to date. 




Scenes from F. B. O.'t forthcoming big laugh 
comedy "Fooli in the Dark." start- ng Matt 
Moore and Patsy Ruth Miller. 

Samuel Goldwyn Busy 

Complete Plans for Enlargement of 
Production Activities 

Immediately upon his arrival on the West 
Coast, Samuel Goldwyn completed prepara- 
tions for the enlargement of his production 
activities at the United Studio. In order to 
meet the increased demands of the First Na- 
tional schedule for the fall, George Fitz- 
maurice will start production on "Tarnish" 
on May 15, while "Potash and Perlmutter in 
Hollywood" will begin on June 1. The lead- 
ing roles in "Tarnish" will be played by May 
McAvoy and Ronald Colman, while thr 
adaptation will be made from Frances Marion's 
scenario. 

"Potash and Perlmutter in Hollywood," 
which is adapted from Montague Glass' 
Broadway stage success, "Business Before 
Pleasure,* will be directed by Al Green, who 
will use Frances Marion's script. Alex Carr 
will play "Perlmutter" while George Sidney, 
who was selected by Mr. Goldwyn to suc- 
ceed the late Barney Barnard, will play "Abe 
Potash." 



Lubitsch Picks Cast 

The principal players in the forthcoming 
Ernest Lubitsch production for Warner 
Brothers have been selected this week. They 
include: May McAvoy, Pauline Frederick, 
Lew Cody, Willard Louis and Pierre 
Gendron. 




Scenes from "Not One to Spare," a Renaud Hoffman production, distributed by W. W. Hodkinson Corporation. 



The Shot 
that was 
heard 

Round 
theWorld 

was fire d in 
1776* But 
ikat was 
he fore 




May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 




Scenes from "What Shall I Do?" starring Dorothy Mac kail!. It is a Frank Woods 
production released by W. W. Hodkinson Corporation. 



Harold Lloyd's "Girl Shy" 
Setting Many New Records 



FIRST-RUN showings of Harold Lloyd's 
latest comedy feature for Pathe, "Girl 
Shy," have given rise to a spirited 
contest of international proportions. Vying 
with the accounts of smashed records from 
key centers in the United States are the re- 
ports emanating from the Dominion of 
Canada. 

At the New York Strand, where "Girl 
Shy" is enjoying the rare distinction of a 
two weeks' run, the picture by the middle 
of the first week had surpassed the attend- 
ance figures previously set by "Grandma's 
Boy," "Dr. Jack," "Safety Last" and "Why 
Worry?" at this big Broadway house. 

At the big Paramount house in Boston, 
the Fenway, "Girl Shy" was reported by 
Wednesday night as having set up a new 
high mark, being fully 25 per cent, ahead of 
the "Why Worry?" record for the same 
length of time. 

The Capitol Theatre, Montreal, where 
"Girl Shy" opened the week of Apiil 20, will, 
for the second time in the history of the 
theatre, extend the same program through- 
out a second week. The only other produc- 
tion to win this distinction was "Robin 
Hood." The overflow audiences at the Cap- 
itol throughout the first week necessitated 
the extension of the "Girl Shy" showing. 

The record of capacity houses is being 
repeated in each of the Dominion's key cen- 
ters where the picture is being presented. 
Word from these centers early in the week 
indicated that "Girl Shry" in every case would 
surpass the attendance figures previously es- 
tablished by former Harold Lloyd produc- 
tions. The Pathe comedy star has always 
enjoyed unrivaled popularity in Canada since 
his entry into the feature comedy field, and 
in practically all instances the present house 
records among the Dominion's leading first- 



runs are held by some one of his five pre- 
vious feature productions for Pathe. 

At the Capitol Theatre, Vancouver, at- 
tendances early in the week gave definite 
assurances of setting up a new record for 
that house, while at the Hippodrome, To- 
ronto, the attendance record, at present held 
by Lloyd's "Safety Last," showed every in- 
dication of capitulating to "Girl Shy." 



Honor Doug- and Mary 

Cable despatches from London announce 
that Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks 
were the guests of honor last week at the 
Carnival Ball given there by the American 
Legion Post. The ball, one of a series of 
inaugural events in connection with the Em- 
pire Exposition, was held under the patron- 
age of the American Ambassador and a dis- 
tinguished group of patronesses. The Prince 
of Wales was the guest of the Legion at last 
year's ball. 



Signed for New Play 

Constance Bennett, who has just made a 
decided hit in the George Fitzmaurice pro- 
duction, "Cytherca," has been signed by 
Eastern Productions, Inc., to appear in sup- 
port of Helene Chadwick in the Ethel M. 
Dell story, "Her Own Free Will." 

Eastern Productions also announce that 
Paul Scardon has been engaged to direct 
the production. Work will be started at the 
Biograph studio in New York within the 
next week or ten days. 

The production will be released by Hod- 
kinson on July 20th. 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



"Hold Your Breath" Big Christie 
Comedy in Hands of Film Editors 



IN announcing the completion this week of 
the last scenes for "Hold Your Breath," 
the big feature comedy that Al 
Christie is producing for Hodkinson release, 
Mr. Christie says that he intends to make 
this production live up to its title in tempo 
as well as in story, action and acting and 
to this end has turned over to his editors 
and film cutters, approximately forty 
thousand feet of negative with positive in- 
structions to concentrate all of the story's 
rapid-fire action and plot into not more 
than six reels of finished picture. 

"It is my intention," said Mr. Christie, "to 
make 'Hold Your Breath' the most concen- 
trated motion picture comedy ever produced. 
The plot of the story will be put through a 
process of especial condensation until, figura- 



PA. POWERS is one of the individ- 
uals who feels strongly over the re- 
• cent decision of the Federal Trade 
Commission regarding the Eastman situa- 
tion, and airs his views in an emphatic man- 
ner. Mr. Powers believes that his opinions 
are of interest to everyone in the industry. 
He declares : 

"The Federal Trade Commission on April 
20 issued an order to the effect that a cer- 
tain company had a monopoly on the sale of 
cinematograph film. Although this condition 
was considered serious enough by the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission to spend months of 
time and thousands of dollars to prove, and 
was considered a most important news item 
by the press, it is most startling to see the 
apparent disinterest displayed by the motion 
picture industry in general, although it 
should be the most interested. 

Surprise Conditions Existed 

"It does not matter whether the practices 
reported by the Federal Trade Commission- 
have ceased; the significant fact is that the 
conditions characterized by the commission 
as monopolistic tendencies and unfair com- 
petition, were found to have existed. A 
monopoly in the manufacture of cinemato- 
graph film means a monopoly of the entire 
motion picture business. Any one who can 
figure it any other way should certainly step 
forward and receive a prize from those who 
are making every effort to tighten their hold 
on the industry. And yet, the mind of the 
industry seems to have been so hypnotized 
that it might just as well have been dead 
so far as it has done any thinking about 
this, the most important commodity with 
which it deals. One does not have to go far 
to find evidence of this fact, as it is preva- 
lent throughout the industry. 

A Concrete Example 

"A concrete example of this appeared re- 
cently in a trade journal in the form of a 
letter written by one of our most prominent 



tively speaking, it will be 'told in a nut- 
shell' and in the five and a half reels that 
will be released, all lost motion will be elim- 
inated and the action shaped up to the 
highest point of intensity. Only the most 
vitally necessary connecting scenes between 
comedy situations, stunts, gags and thrills 
will be allowed to remain in the finished 
print and I am aiming to turn out a pro- 
duction that will make audiences literally 
'hold their breath' every minute that it is 
on the screen." 

"Hold Your Breath" is scheduled for re- 
lease by Hodkinson on May 25. It has the 
biggest cast of featured players ever as- 
sembled for a single comedy. Sixteen well 
known names are included in the billing 
in addition to unusually large numbers of 
extras used for "bits" and mob scenes. 



laboratory men, from which the following 
is a quotation : 

"'While it is a wonderful thing that Mr. 
Eastman is able to give to the industry film 
at a constantly decreasing price while still 
maintaining the high standard of quality, I 
think that it would be far greater news for 
the industry were Mr. Eastman to announce 
that film would be made of superior quality 
regardless of cost, for improvement in the 
quality of film is the one thing which the 
industry should demand and expect.' 

"But this man and all the rest of us should 
know that no one need 'give us' anything. 
We can create what we want — demand it — 
and get it. And the way to get it is by en- 
couraging healthful competition. It is one 
of the phenomena of modern business that 
our great motion picture industry should see 
nothing wrong in the situation reflected by 
the above indication that the industry must 
take what it can get. 

"Does the 'mind' of the industry admit 
itself hide-bound to one source of supply, 
having to implore relief from a condition 
which is recognized everywhere as being 
one of the heaviest burdens the industry has 
to bear? What if anything happens to this 
one preferential source of supply? Then 
there would be cause for alarm — fortunes 
would be wiped out over night. 

"How do other large industries safeguard 
the quality, price and supply of their impor- 
tant raw materials — especially those raw ma- 
terials without which they could not exist? 
Would the newspapers throughout the coun- 
try allow any one concern to hold them in 
a bag by helping it to acquire a complete 
monopoly of raw paper? Would they kick 
out of the door any competitor who, al- 
though he could give only the same quality 
and price, could at least give them protec- 
tion on supply? Would they not welcome 
this competitor and all others and encourage 
them so that their own industry could be 
free from the fear of sudden destruction? 
There is no end to such questions and they 



New Comedy Unit 



Mack Sennett Begins First of New 
Two-Reel Comedies 

A new comedy unit is adding to the hum 
of production activity at the Mack Sennett 
studio where two-reel comedies are made 
for Pathe release, F. Richard Jones having 
taken up the mageplione and commenced 
work on the first of the series of two-reel 
comedies Mack Sennett will produce featur- 
ing Ralph Graves. 

Mack Sennett is the author of the first 
story for Graves, and it was written to bring 
out the personal charm, whimsical humor 
and sincerity of this popular actor, who won 
his first success in D. W. Griffith's "Dream 
Street" and recently added to his laurels in 
Mabel Normand's "The Extra Girl" and 
with Marion Davies in "Yolanda." 

This new production unit has caused some 
shifting of leading women at the Sennett 
studio. Alice Day, who, after scoring with 
Norma Talmadge in "Secrets," was signed 
by Mack Sennett and given leading roles 
opposite Harry Langdon, will be Ralph 
Graves' leading woman, while Natalie Kings- 
ton will be given the prominence in the 
Graves comedies that her beauty deserves. 
Miss Kingston left a popular dancing team 
to join the Sennett forces, and will make 
her debut as leading lady on the Pathe pro- 
gram opposite Ben Turpin in "Yukon Jake," 
to be released June 8. Marceline Day, of 
the beauty brigade, succeeds her sister, 
Alice, as Langdon's leading woman. 



Pathe Short Subjects 



"Near Dublin," Starring Stan Laurel, 
Among Releases for May 11 

Two comedies from the Hal Roach studios 
head Pathe's schedule of releases for May 
11. The first stars Stan Laurel in a two- 
reel comic appropriately titled "Near Dub- 
lin," as it travesties the style of Irish drama 
made famous by Chauncey Olcott and other 
exponents of the Emerald Isle. 

"North of 50-50," the second Hal Roach 
comedy, is one reel of monkey shines by 
the Dippy-Doo-Dads, who give an animal 
interpretation of what goes on "north of 
53, where the population is split 50-50 be- 
tween bad men and Northwest Mounted 
Police.'' 

The Patheserial, "Leatherstocking," reach- 
es the eighth chapter, which is titled "Out 
of the Storm." "When Winter Comes" is 
the title of the current Aesop Flim Fable. 



Title Changed 

Fox Film Corporation announces that. 
"Romance Ranch" has been selected as the 
final title for the latest John Gilbert attrac- 
tion which is being produced at the Fox 
West Coast Studios under the working title 
of "Colorau." This program picture is 
scheduled for release in June. 



are all analogous to our own industry, and 
painfully so. 

"When Powers Film Products entered the 
raw film business there was only one other 
source of supply. Since then the industry 
is able to purchase its requirements of raw 
film at a saving of at least $200,000 a week. 
Powers Film Products feels that it has con- 
tributed in some measure to effecting this 
saving even with the comparatively small 
co-operation shown it by the industry.'' 



P. A. Powers Airs Views on 
Trade Commission's Decision 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



201 




Scenei from "Miami," starring Betty Compson. Distributed by the W. W. Hodkinson 

Corporation. 



Mix's "Trouble Shooter" 

Is Scheduled for May 4 



THE Fox Film Corporation will release 
"The Trouble Shooter," the latest of 
the series of Tom Mix program pic- 
tures, on May 4. It is an original story by 
Frederick and Fanny Hatton. John Conway, 
a newcomer to the Fox lot, directed. Kath- 
leen Key is Mix's new leading woman. 
Others in the cast are Earl Fox, Gunnis 
Davis, Howard Truesdale, Frank Currier, 
Mike Donlin, Dolores Rousse, Charles Mc- 
Hugh and Al Freemont. 

"The Trouble Shooter'' is the name of the 
lookout man for a big power plant, whose 
dangerous job is to see that wires and cables 



are kept in perfect condition. The story 
suggested itself to the Hattons as a result 
of a talk with George T. Bigelo, third vice- 
president of the Southern Sierras Power 
Company of California. Mr. Hatton roomed 
with Mr. Bigelo at college and they met 
again recently at a fraternity dinner. Ex- 
pressing keen interest in the work of the 
"trouble shooter" with a power plant, Mr. 
Bigelo invited Mr. and Mrs. Hatton to his 
plant at Riverside, California, and they were 
taken through it. As a result of their study 
of this all-important work, they wrote a 
story around the "trouble shooter" for Mr. 
Mix. 



Rothacker's Branch at Chicago 
Enlarges Commercial Division 



THE fourteenth anniversary of the 
Rothacker Film Manufacturing Com- 
pany was marked by the opening of 
a reorganized and greatly enlarged commer- 
cial department at the Chicago laboratory, 
which will be dedicated to the purpose of 
giving free-lance cameramen and small prac- 
tical picture producers over the country the 
same quality and service enjoyed by the big- 
gest and most discriminating producers. 

The new department is operated as a sep- 
arate unit from the laboratory proper, hav- 
ing its own printing, developing and inspec- 
tion departments, its own cutting room for 
visiting cameramen, and its own force of 
workers who will do commercial work and 
nothing else. 

Workers in the new commercial depart- 
ment are determined to maintain an average 



twenty-six hours' service. A negative will 
be developed, a print made, inspected and 
dispatched to the customer — all within 
twenty-six hours. Mr. Rothacker has given 
the department an auto truck which will be 
the department's "special messenger," rush- 
ing prints down to the Central Parcel Post 
Station as fast as they pass inspection. 

The Rothacker Company was founded in 
May, 1910, by Watterson R. Rothacker, 
when he left a newspaper job to become the 
pioneer specialist in motion picture adver- 
tising. His office was at first under his hat, 
but a little later he advanced to a small desk 
in a Loop office occupied by several other 
rising young "desk spacers." 

Once his practical picture business was 
firmly established, Mr. Rothacker branched 
out into the laboratory field. 



was fired in 
1716 « But 
ikat was 
hefore 



1 



I 



202 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 




Scenes from Vitagraph's "Between Friends." 



"Another Scandal" Is New 

Treatment of Flapperism 



COOLIDGE STREETER of the Hod- 
kinson production department, who is 
now in Miami, Florida, where "An- 
other Scandal," starring Lois Wilson, has 
just been completed, reports that Miss Wil- 
son "has scored another distinct triumph" 
in the Cosmo Hamilton story that will be 
released by the Hodkinson Corporation on 
June 20. 

"In the filming of Cosmo Hamilton's story, 
'Another Scandal,' the screen has at last re- 
ceived a true treatment of the primary fac- 
tors in happy married life," says Mr. 
Streeter in his report to the Hodkinson of- 
ficials. "The picture has many points and 
possibilities that stand out, but above all it 
is intensely human and the public will see in 
its characters close personal friends or re- 
flections of their own lives." 



EDUCATIONAL FILM EXCHANGES, 
INC., announces that there will be no 
lack of short subjects available for 
the exhibitor, nor will the quality of the sub- 
jects released on the Educational program 
be below that of the standard maintained 
during the cooler months. 

Over a dozen two-reel comedies will be 
released after May 1 and this selection will 
be more than representative of the quality 
of the previous releases, they say. The new 
two-reel comedies will include releases of 
the Christie, Hamilton, Mermaid and Tuxedo 
brands in addition to two Jack White Com- 



In "Another Scandal" Cosmo Hamilton 
deals primarily with the fact that love, ro- 
mance, loyalty and humor are absolutely es- 
sential to insure the enjoyment of married 
life to its fullest extent. The author wrote 
the story as a justification of the "flapper" 
who realizes that her flapperism can last at 
best only three or four years before she is 
inevitably replaced by younger flappers. 
However, in these three or four years the 
flapper is associated with all kinds of men, 
the best and the worst, and when she does 
finally give her heart to a man it is inev- 
itably to a man in every sense of the word. 

The picture was produced under the di- 
rection of E. Hallows Griffith for the Til- 
ford Cinema Corporation at Miami, and an 
early trade screening is being arranged by 
Hodkinson. 



edy Specials made under a contract for three 
of these specials signed last fall. One of 
the specials, "Midnight Blues," has already 
been released. 

More two-reel comedies will be released 
during the coming summer than in any other 
summer since the inception of Educational, 
that company reports. In addition there will 
be the regular releases of the single reel 
brands consisting of Cameo Comedies, the 
"Sing Them Again'' series, the Lyman H. 
Howe Hodge-Podge series, the Bruce Wil- 
derness Tales and the new humor reel, The 
Fun Shop. 



World's Premiere May 3 



Loa Angeles to See Tourneur's "White 
Moth" at Loew's State 

"The White Moth," a Levee-Tourneur pro- 
duction and a current release of First Na- 
tional, will have its world's premiere on 
May 3 at Loew's State Theatre in Los An- 
geles. This marks the first time that a 
Maurice Tourneur production has had its 
first public presentation in a Coast city. 

Following the run at Loew's State "The 
White Moth" will play in all West Coast 
Theatres, Inc., houses, simultaneously with 
the general release of the picture in first- 
run houses throughout the country. 

Barbara La Marr and Conway Tearle are 
co-featured in this picture, appearing for the 
first time in the Levee-Tourneur series for 
First National release. Ben Lyon, Charles 
de Roche and Josie Sedgwick complete the 
cast of principals. "The White Moth" is an 
adaptation of a magazine story by Izola 
Forrester. 



Critics Praise "Desire" 



One of Metro's Early Releases This 
Season Praised by Los Angeles 

"Desire," a Louis Burston Production for 
Metro, was one of the early releases on the 
Metro schedule this season, but it is still 
one of the most popular attractions in thea- 
tres throughout the country. 

" 'Desire' offers you a lot of entertain- 
ment," wrote the critic of the Examiner. 
"The cast is one of the most imposing that 
has been assembled in any recent picture. 
Not only is there a big cast but it is the sort 
of film play in which everyone is given a 
lot of acting to do." 

"If you want to spend an entertaining 
hour," wrote the critic of the Times," go 
down to Clune's Broadway and take a look 
at 'Desire.' It is warmly human throughout 
and its story is absorbing and finely acted; 
it has moments that are truly great. In any 
case it is far, far better than many a picture 
that is loudly trumpeted." 



Universal Rewards Esch 

William Esch, salesman of Universal's 
Indianapolis exchange, who won first prize 
in the Laemmle Month Sales Contest as the 
best Universal salesman in the country, has 
been appointed manager of the Indianapolis 
exchange as a result of his high standing 
in the contest. L. C. Thompson, the present 
manager, will take charge of Universafs 
Cleveland office. 



In Leading- Role 

Norma Shearer has been chosen by Victor 
Seastrom to play the leading feminine role 
in "The Tree of the Garden," the Edward C. 
Booth novel which he is to film for the Gold- 
wyn studios. Miss Shearer is now playing 
opposite Jack Pickford in "The End of the 
World." 



"There will be no let-down in either the 
quality or quantity of Short Subjects from 
Educational," said Mr. E. W. Hammons, 
president of Educational, on his return from 
New Orleans, where he attended the First 
National convention. "We will, in fact, re- 
lease some of the best pictures of the year 
which will be available to exhibitors during 
the heated period." 



Educational Looking Forward 
to Biggest Summer of Career 



May 10, 1924 MOVING PICTURE WORLD 207 

Illinois Convention Discusses 

Non-Theatricals and Music Tax 



THE annual convention of the Illinois 
Motion Picture Theatre Owners was 
called to order at the Sherman Hotel, 
Chicago, on Wednesday, April 23, by Glenn 
Reynolds of DeKalb, 111. President Reynolds 
made his report on the activities of the year 
and various committees were appointed to 
take up matters of interest to the assembled 
delegates. The report of Secretary Ludwig 
Seigel was approved and the meeting ad- 
journed until afternoon, when W. A. Steffes, 
president of the Minnesota association, made 
the principal address against the music tax 
and urged the Illinois association join the 
new association of the midwest theatre own- 
ers which was recently organized in Chicago. 
Judge Handy from Kansas also talked on 
the music tax. Jack Miller of the associa- 
tion, in company with Judge Handy and Al 
Steffes, went to Washington to appear 
against the tax for the exhibitors of this 
territory. 

The meeting went on record as opposed to 
arbitration of non-theatrical bookings. The 
big dinner dance on Wednesday night at 
the Hotel Sherman was a success in every 
way and a larger attendance than expected 
was on hand for the festivities. On Thurs- 
day morning the members got down to busi- 
ness early and voted to appoint an active 
business manager who will go out in the 
field and organize the state in a thorough 
manner. At the present time the Illinois 
association has about 300 members and there 
are approximately 1,200 houses in the state, 
of which quite a few belong to circuits. A 
meeting of the executive committee is called 
for May 6th to decide on the appointment. 
Twenty seven members of the executive com- 
mittee were selected by the convention and 
they will also meet on May 6 to elect the 




Scenes from the new Universal comedy, 
"Rest in Pieces," featuring Bert Roach, Alice 
Howell and Billy Bletcher. 



officers of the association. 

The meeting adjourned at noon and the 
convention was over, the members leaving 
for their homes enthusiastic over the out- 
look for a stronger state organization with 
which to combat the dangers that confront 
the exhibitor. The delegates were enthusi- 
astic over the good showing of the Chicago 
association. Secretary Seigel says that they 
have abount 200 members in the city and 
efforts will be made to get the balance in at 
an early date. 

Leo Brunhild, of Brunhild & Young, was 
toastmaster at the banquet of the Illinois 
association dinner dance at the Sherman 
Hotel and carried off the honors in credit- 
able style. He kept the program on the 
jump and there were no dull moments for 
the crowd. 

About 190 sat down to the dinner and lis- 
tened to Frank Padden, assistant corpora- 
tion counsel, who represented Mayor Dever 
in welcoming the delegates to the city. He 
was followed by Michael Igoe, counsel of the 
association, who made a happy talk on mat- 
ters of interest to the boys. 

William J. Sweeney, office manager of the 



A SPECIAL meeting of the Independent 
Motion Picture Producers and Dis- 
tributors Association, held recently at 
their headquarters, 1650 Broadway, heard 
the report of the committee appointed to 
devise ways and means for establishing a 
branch of this association on the West 
Coast. Jesse J. Goldburg, chairman of this 
committee, with his associates, Messrs. Joe 
Brandt, Bobby North, I. E. Chadwick and 
Dr. W. E. Shallenberger, rLCommended that 
a branch of the I. M. P. P. D. A., with a 
local executive secretary, be established 
without further delay in either Hollywood 
or Los Angeles. 

William J. Russell of the Russell Produc- 
tions, Inc., Los Angeles, who was a guest 
at the meeting, reported that great enthusi- 
asm was manifested in this new and rapidly 
growing association by their western broth- 
ers and on the strength of the committee's 
recommendation and Mr. Russell's report, it 
was unanimously moved that Mr. Goldburg, 
who is already on his way to the Coast, con- 
tinue the negotiations for this new branch. 
William Steiner announced that he was leav- 
ing for Hollywood early next week and vol- 
unteered to assist Mr. Goldburg in this 
project. With such able representation from 
the East, success is assured. 

Jack Cohn, chairman of the Membership 
Committee, announced that several com- 
panies have signified their intention to join 
the association and he will submit their sig- 
nified applications at the next regular meet- 
ing, to be held the early part of May. 

President Chadwick announced that the 
last and probably largest luncheon until the 
Fall season, will be held on Tuesday, May 
13, at the Hotel Astor. Several prominent 
individuals who are considered authority in 
the moving picture industry have been in- 
vited to address the luncheon and it is con- 



Illinois association was on the job as door- 
keeper of the convention room and kept 
the curious ones out and the delegates in and 
gave the press boys the glad hand. 

Among the exhibitors who registered with 
Office Manager William J. Sweeney were 
Steve Bennis, of the Lincoln Theatre, Lin- 
coln, 111.; Ben Berve, Majestic Theatre, Ro- 
chelle, 111. ; A. Bossen, Strand Theatre, Men- 
dota; Louis H. Frank, Samuel Abrahams, 
Ludwig Seigel, M. A. Choynski, Aaron Sap- 
erstein, Sidney Selig, Harry Brunhild, A. J. 
Haley, Michael Seigel, Frank Siem, George 
D. Hopkinson, all of Chicago. 

J. F. Dittman, Lindo Theatre, Freeport; 
Wiley N. McConnell, Orpheum Theatre, 
Quincy; J. C. Miller, Princess Theatre, 
Woodstock; F. N. Kenney, Star Theatre, 
Watseka; Barney Broher and John Kaletis, 
American of Moline and Rialto at Rock 
Island; Elmer H. Uhlhorn, Dicke Theatre, 
Downers Grove; A. E. Korndat, Lyric Thea- 
tre, East Moline; R. C. Williams, Majestic 
Theatre, Streator; Charles Nathan and D. 
George Mitchell, of the Theatres Operating 
Corporation of Peoria, and Joseph Hopp of 
the Fort Armstrong Theatre at Rock Island. 



fidentially expected at this time that they 
will accept the invitation. 

A forward step was taken when the I. M. 
P. P. D. A. decided to affiliate with the Ar- 
bitration Society of America. This will 
make it possible to secure a thoroughly 
posted arbitrator to take part in all arbitra- 
tion hearings which are held by the asso- 
ciation, the first of the controversies to be 
settled by arbitration to be held next week. 



1 




Scenes from the Fox Sunshine comedy 
"When W ise Ducks Meet." 



I. M. P. P. D. A. to Establish 

Branch on the West Coast 



208 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



T. O. C. C. to Confer with 

F. I. L. M. on Arbitration 



FOR the purpose of considering a re- 
visal of some of the existing rules in 
the arbitration code the T. O. C. C. will 
meet jointly with the F. I. L. M. Club on 
May 5 in the Hotel Astor, New York City. 
"A year's experience has given rise to 
things which might stand correction," stated 
Chairman O'Reilly in outlining the real pur- 
pose of this session. 

As things now stand in this arbitration 
matter the T. 0. C. C. tries cases not only 
of its own members but of non-members. 
The larger percentage of the cases tried 
during the past year were those arising out 
of disputes among non-members, said the 
T. O. C. C. head. Members of his organi- 
zation, he remarked, rarely resort to this 
method of litigation, as they are well in- 
formed of the regulations and abide by 
them. 

It will be largely to determine whether 
the T. O. C. C. desfres to continue the bur- 
den of acting as a court for non-members 
that the May 5 meeting is scheduled. 

On May 1 the T. O. C. C. will move from 



LEWIS J. SELZNICK announces in a 
statement this week that he will de- 
vote most of his time to the radio 
business in which he has organized the 
American Radio Manufacturing Corporation, 
after first having acquired the Radio Prod- 
ucts Manufacturing Company of Cleveland, 
makers of Voceleste machines. The state- 
ment reveals that Selznick will still retain 
his interest in Selznick motion pictures. Of 
his radio company Arthur S. Friend is treas- 
urer ; David O. Selznick and A. R. Claus, 
vice-presidents ; A. L. Grill, secretary. In 
addition to these officers the board of di- 
rectors includes : R. D. Hickok and S. and 
F. Fox, all of Cleveland, O. The statement, 
in part, is as follows : 

"As a first step I organized, last week, 
the General American Radio Manufacturing 
Corporation. We immediately took for our 
executive offices the fourth floor of the 



its present quarters at 1S40 Broadway to 
more spacious accommodations in the Times 
Building. On the fourth floor of that build- 
ing the organization will occupy 2,000 feet 
of floor space which will enable members 
to hold there all meetings, except special 
affairs where guests are invited. The 
smallness of their present location necessi- 
tated all sessions being held in the Hotel 
Astor. 

These new offices, under the present plans, 
will be retained until the organization is 
ready to move into its clubhouse. One site 
for the latter has already been submitted to 
architects who are at work making the re- 
quired drawings. 

Chairman O'Reilly says that exclusive of 
the furnishings the Chamber is planning to 
expend approximately $450,000 for the 
building and land. 

The Chamber has made all arrangements 
for the installation dinner it will tender its 
recently elected officers. This will take 
place at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, New York, 
on May 24. 



American Bond and Mortgage building, and 
are now in full swing. We have already ac- 
quired control of the Radio Products Manu- 
facturing Company of Cleveland, makers of 
the Voceleste machines. We shall advertise 
and distribute our products nationally in 
what has become known as 'the Selznick 
manner.' We shall use the line 'Lewis J. 
Selznick presents' in connection with all our 
instruments. 

"I and the immediate members of my 
family own, always have owned, and always 
will own over 80% of all the Selznick motion 
picture interests. As far as active par- 
ticipation goes, Myron Selznick is vice-presi- 
dent of the Selznick Distributing Corpora- 
tion. I have other picture plans, which, be- 
cause of the ambitious scope of my radio 
enterprises, must be held in abeyance for 
the present. These may also hold a measure 
of interest for the picture world." 



To Hold Meeting 



Society of M. P. Engineers Plans 
Novel Get-together 

When the Society of Motion Picture En- 
gineers meet May 19 to 22 the membership 
will be greeted with an exceptionally ex- 
cellent program. The papers listed to date 

are : 

F. F. Renwick, "The Effect of Humidity 
Upon Photographic Speed"; J. I. Crabtree, 
"Improvements in Motion Picture Labora- 
tory Apparatus'' ; J. G. Capstaff, "The Du- 
plication of Motion Picture Negatives"; 
P. R. Bassett, "The Progress of Arc Pro- 
jection Efficiency"; S. C. Rogers, "A Method 
of Comparing Definitions of Projection 
Lenses"; H. Griffin, "Is the Optical Pro- 
jector Commercially Practical?"; R. C. Hub- 
bard, "The Straight Line Developing Ma- 
chine''; H. P. Gage, "Colored Glasses for 
Stage Illumination"; A. M. Candy, "Con- 
stant Current and Constant Potential Gen- 
erators for Motion Picture Projection 
Arcs"; W. W. Kincaid, "Requirements of 
the Educational and Non-Theatrical Field"; 
Dr. Kellner, "Stereoscopy and Its Possibili- 
ties in Projection"; Dr. Kellner, "Results 
Obtained with the Relay Condenser Sys- 
tem''; F. H. Richardson, "Difficulties En- 
countered in the Standardization of Theatre 
Screen and Illumination"; A. G. Balcom, 
"Motion Picture Projector as a Medium of 
Instruction"; Max Briefer, "Some Charac- 
teristics of Film Base"; G. C. Ziliotto, "The 
Panoramic Camera"; C. Francis Jenkins 
(title not yet received). 

There will be other papers, presumably of 
equal interest. The entertainment program 
is being prepared by Cudmore, the Slim, and 
gives promise of being something very much 
out of the ordinary. The Society is trying 
an experiment. It is holding its spring 
meeting at a magnificent country hotel, the 
Lakewood Farm Inn, near Roscoe, New 
York, up Binghamton way. It is a five-hour 
drive, by auto, from New York City. The 
idea of the country hotel meeting was sprung 
by William V. D. Kelley, of Prizma fame. 
The outcome will be watched with consid- 
erable interest, as it is believed that meet- 
ings will be better attended and the discus- 
sion of papers therefore more complete and 
more valuable to the industry. 

During the interim between meetings 
there will be golf, horseback riding, billiards, 
bowling and many other sports, all free to 
members ; also there will be the program 
Cudmore is preparing. 



Lewis J. Selznick Heads Radio 
Company; Keeps Film Interests 



Lasky Arouses Enthusiasm at 
Paramount Sales Convention 



EXPRESSING the belief that the mo- 
tion picture industry is facing a season 
of unprecedented prosperity, Jesse L. 
Lasky aroused a high degree of enthusiasm 
at the Paramount sales convention in San 
Francisco when he reviewed the production 
program now under way at the company's 
West Coast and Eastern studios. 

The San Francisco convention, which is 
the third and last of the series of division 
sales gatherings of the Paramount distribu- 
tion department, opened its sessions at the 
Hotel Whitcomb on Monday morning, April 
28, and continued three days. John D. Clark, 



division sales manager, presided, the conven- 
tion being under the supervision of General 
Manager S. R. Kent. Accompanying Mr. 
Lasky to San Francisco from Los Angeles 
were Cecil B. DeMille, director-general, and 
Arch Reeve, A. D. Wilkie, Barrett C. Kies- 
ling and Louis Gardy, of the West Coast 
studio publicity department. 

Following the close of the convention on 
Wednesday night, the home office delegation 
left for Los Angeles and Hollywood, where 
they will remain until Saturday, when they 
will start their return journey to New York. 

Those from the distribution department 



attending the San Francisco convention 

were : 

San Francisco — Herman Wobber, O. V. 
Traggardh, J. J. Partridge, J. M. Betten- 
court, C. A. Roeder, A. Pickett, G. V. Sul- 
livan, J. Myers, H. C. Eagle. 

Los Angeles — C. N. Peacock, I. G. White, 
F. C. Clark, F. S. Wilson, M. C. Buries, 
J. A. Clark, H. Y. Swift. 

Seattle— G. P. Endert, H. W. West, A. A. 
Haley, H. S. Hoke, M. Segal, W. E. Nelson, 
K. Krueger. 

Portland— T. H. Bailey, V. R. Moore, 
H. N. West, A. W. Adamson, L. G. Stang, 
W. D. Brink. 

Salt Lake City — Louis Marcus, L. J. Mc- 
Ginley, E. M. Loy, F. S. Gulbranson, C. G. 
Epperson, F. J. Murphy, A. K. Shepherd, 
H. W. Braly, R. Ricketson. 

Denver — O. Wog, A. E. Dickson, C. J. 
Duer, E. I. Reed, J. G. Haney, M. S. Wilson. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



209 



Snappy Stunt for "The Chechahcos" 

Realizing that in "The Chechahcos" they have an unusual production 
from the standpoint of title, story productions values and the fact that it 
is the first picture of feature length filmed entirely in Alaska, and in 
keeping with its big box-office possibilities, Associated Exhibitors are 
puttng over exploitation that is "making 'em sit up and take notice." 

As a part of a big campaign which includes extensive trade paper 
advertising, a showing has been arranged for Thursday evening, May 1, 
at the Ritz-Carlton, one of New York's most fashionable hotels. This will 
be followed by dancing for which music will be furnished by Paul White- 
man and his band, together with supper, and promises to be one of the 
most elaborate affairs of the season. 

Not content with this, the wide-awake publicity department of Asso- 
ciated devised a clever and effective exploitation stunt. A messenger, 
garbed as an Alaskan miner and leading a genuine malamut dog, visited 
the offices of the press and scores of prominent exhibitors and presented 
them with an envelope which contained tickets for the showing, dancing 
and supper, and an invitation in the form of a snappy eight-page herald 
printed on one side only and folded so as to make a double-sheet four-page 
pamphlet. 

But this was not all, for accompanying the invitation was a small carton 
tied with green ribbon which contained a large metal nugget, representa- 
tive of Alaska's mineral wealth, with the suggestion that it be used as a 
paper weight. 

Did this stunt prove effective? We'll say so, for everyone along Film 
Row is now talking about "The Chechahcos." 



Universal Adds "Oh Doctor!" 
to Last Super-Feature Group 



CARL LAEMMLE, president of Uni- 
versal Pictures Corporation, has pur- 
chased Harry Leon Wilson's story, 
"Oh, Doctor 1" It will be added to Univer- 
sal's 1924-25 super productions. Bernard 
McConville, supervising editor of Jewel pro- 
ductions at Universal City, where the story 
will be filmed, has arranged to have Harvey 
Thew, who wrote the continuity for "Mer- 
ton of the Movies" and "Sporting Youth," 
do the continuity for "Oh, Doctor 1" 

It is planned to produce "Oh, Doctor 1" on 
an elaborate scale and have it surpass "The 
Reckless Age" and "Sporting Youth" so far 
as entertainment quality is concerned. No 
player has yet been assigned the leading 
role, although it is expected that one of the 
Universal stars will be given the preference. 

'Oh, Doctor 1" contains a wealth of ma- 
terial for humorous delineation and for this 
reason it is anticipated as another starring 
vehicle for Reginald Denny, whose work in 



"Captain Fearless," an adaptation of "The 
Missourian," presents him in a role that is 
new to screen types. 

The purchase of "Oh, Doctor !" is in line 
with the new story policy inaugurated by 
Carl Laemmle, president of Universal, dur- 
ing his recent visit to Universal City. This 
policy contemplates a concentration on high 
class stories by high class authors. The 
most likeable writers of fiction and their 
best-sellers will come to the screen through 
Universal channels, it is promised. "K,'' 
which is being filmed under the title of "K — 
The Unknown," starring Virginia Valli, "The 
Missourian," starring Reginald Denny, "But- 
terfly," with an all-star cast including Laura 
La Plante, Kenneth Harlan, Norman Kerry 
and Ruth Clifford, and "Mitzi," starring 
Mary Philbin, are cited as examples of the 
policy. 

"K" is Mary Roberts Rinehart's popular 
novel and it is being directed by Harry A. 



Truart Lists Another 

The first week in May Truart will release 
"The Eternal Riddle," an adaptation of Sir 
Arthur Conan Doyle's novel, "The Tragedy 
of the Korosko," with Wanda Hawley, Nigel 
Barrie and Pedro de Cordoba as the prin- 
cipal members of an all-star cast. "The 
Eternal Riddle" was produced under the di- 
rection of Tom Terriss and was made en- 
tirely in Egypt, its scenes being laid in Cairo 
and in the Libyan Desert and along the 
River Nile. All scenes were photographed 
in the exact locale called for in Sir A. Conan 
Doyle's story. 



"In Fast Company" Listed 

"In Fast Company," the third of the 
series of Richard Talmadge thrill-dramas, 
will be nationally released during the last 
week in April. In this picture, pronounced 
the best this star has ever appeared in, he 
will be supported by such well-known play- 
ers as Mildred Harris, Charles Clary, Shel- 
don Lewis, Snitz Edwards, Lydia Yeamans 
Titus, Douglas Gerrard and Jack Herrick. 



Pollard. Percy Marmont, Maurice Ryan, 
Marguerita Fischer and Francis Feeney have 
been added to the cast. 

"Captain Fearless" is being made by James 
W. Home. He is guiding Denny and a cast 
including Julanne Johnston, Claire DeLorez, 
Harry Tighe, Stanhope Wheatcroft, Tom S. 
Guise, James O. Barrows and others. Eu- 
gene P. Lyle, Jr., wrote the novel. 

"Butterfly" is being directed by Clarence 
L. Brown. Olga Printzlau wrote the con- 
tinuity. This novel by Kathleen Norris is, 
according to booksellers' reports, one of the 
most widely read novels of recent years. 

"The Rose of Paris" is the production title 
of "Mitzi," Mary Philbin's vehicle, and Irv- 
ing Cummings is directing the filming of this 
French "best seller" written by "Delly," 
brother and sister writing team of France. 

Harry Leon Wilson, Earl Derr Biggers 
and George Barr McCutcheon are, in terms 
of popular appeal, a great triumvirate of 
authors for one film producer to have rep- 
resented on one season's program. The 
stories by the last two to be seen on the 
screen are "The Reckless Age," by Biggers, 
recently completed with Denny, and "Hus- 
bands of Edith/' by McCutcheon, which will 
be a forthcoming special feature production. 
It also is noteworthy that Bryon Morgan is 
represented in recent big features with 
"Sporting Youth." 

Guide your picture picking by Straight 
From the Shoulder Reports — twelve 
pages in this issue. 




Scenes from the Associated Exhibitor's Special. Production, "The Chechahcos," a Story of Alaska. 



210 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 











j 

1 lie x lay , r lUlll 1 lie XlcLUXc .rVllglc 

By Robert G. Lisman 









'f/^OBRA," a drama by Martin Brown, presented by L. Lawrence Weber at the 
v> Hudson Theatre on April 22, 1924. 

Without doubt, this is the most suitable product for pictures that the stage has 
offered this year. The "Cobra" of the title refers to the "tiger tiger" in the hero. He 
successfully suppresses his baser instincts and in the end wins the true woman, but be- 
fore this happens, he has to battle with an accomplished vampire who is the wife of 
his best friend. The tattle within the man between loyalty and his carnal instinct is ex- 
ceptionally well done. This is essentially a triangle play with, in this case, a fourth 
angle. 

This property can be made into a very human, fast-moving, gripping picture without 
necessarily being an extravagant production. The burning of a large hotel should 
be the most expensive item. 

Mr. Louis Calhern, who has done a good many character bits in pictures, scored a 
personal hit on the stage in this play. 

<< r TV-IE DUST HEAP," a melodrama by Paul Dickney and Bernard J. McOwen, 
*■ presented by Lyle D. Andrews (in association with James Shesgreen) at the 
Vanderbilt Theatre on April 24, 1924. 

This play is an amalgamation of the customary "hokum" that goes into Northwest 
Mounted Police pictures, with a dash of "Abie's Irish Rose" propaganda added for 
good measure. 

The story deals with a white girl, brought up by a squaw. She is abducted by white 
slavers, rescued in time by her "Red Coat sweetheart" and is found by her father, 
a Hebrew. If anybody wants to use the heretofore mentioned elements for a picture, I 
believe they can do so without infringing on any copyright law, as patents on these 
themes ran out many years ago. Of course, if anybody likes the title "The Dust 
Heap," the chances are they will have to pay heavily for it. 

**/^*\RDEN OF WEEDS," a drama written and produced by Leon Gordon at the 
Gaiety Theatre on April 28. 

The play concerns itself with a man who had moral tendencies and kept a "Garden 
of Weeds." One of the weeds is transplanted into a formal garden. This displeases 
the gardener of weeds. He goes into the formal garden with the intent to regain his 
weed. For his trouble the husband throws him downstairs which successfully breaks 
the villain's neck — so the weed and her mate live happily ever after, despite her (to 
quote a line from the play) "Rolls Royce Conscience." 

There is absolutely nothing new to pictures or the censors in this plot or theme. 
Some years ago Bessie Barriscale made a picture for the old R-C picture company 
that so closely resembles this play that anybody desiring to picturize "Garden of 
Weeds" could purchase this film and just change the title. 

Lillian Tashman, who has done considerable picture work lately, gave a very fine 
performance in this play as one of the less important weeds. Miss Tashman certainly 
should be considered for the main cleanser in the picture version of "Spring Cleaning." 

Metro-Goldwyn Capitalization 
Is Announced as $8,000,000 



THE following statement is issued by 
Newburger, Henderson & Loeb, New 
York brokers specializing in service 
to the motion picture industry, with offices 
at 1531 Broadway and 511 Fifth avenue: 

A new corporation, "Metro-Goldwyn Cor- 
poration," will be formed with a capitaliza- 
tion of approximately $8,000,000, of which 
about $5,000,000 will be 7 per cent, cumula- 
tive preferred and the balance common. The 
preferred stock will have a par value of 
about $27 a share, the book value of the 
present Goldwyn stock, and will be dis- 
tributed to Goldwyn holders share for share. 
Metro-Goldwyn common stock will be given 
to Loew's, Inc., in exchange for its holdings 
of present Metro stock. 

In place of a stock which has received no 
dividends since organization, Goldwyn stock- 
holders will receive a new stock with an 
annual cumulative dividend rate of approxi- 
mately $1.90 a share, or over 12 per cent, on 
the present market price. This stock will 
be the premier security of the company own- 



ing the entire assets of the present Goldwyn 
Pictures Corporation and Metro Pictures 
Corporation. While official earnings figures 
are not available, it is estimated that the 
new corporation will have an earning power 
of between $1,500,000 and $2,000,000, or ap- 
proximately from four to six times annual 
dividend requirements on the preferred, with- 
out giving effect to the economies that might 
be effected by the merger. 

In addition, a sinking fund of $100,000 per 
annum will be available, beginning 1926, to 
retire this preferred at about 27. 

On account of its priority to the interest of 
Loew's, Inc., in the new corporation, which 
it is said involves a substantial part of 
Loew's earnings, this preferred will occupy 
a strategic position. 

The company will control the consolidated 
holdings of the two present existing cor- 
porations, and will operate 340 theatres, in- 
cluding the Capitol, said to be the largest 
theatre in the country. Stockholders will 
benefit by the excess of present earnings of 



Long Independents 



Many Members of Filmlab, Inc., in the 
Business Since 1912 

In the days of 1912-13, when the entire 
film industry was in the hands of the Gen- 
eral Film Company, a group of men with 
plenty of backbone and fighting spirit en- 
tered the business to produce independent 
pictures, to the delight of the handful of 
exhibitors, who encouraged them. Some of 
these pioneer Independents are still stand- 
ing their ground, and together with many 
newcomers to augment their ranks, are to- 
day a vital and important factor in the in- 
dustry. The independent producer, distrib- 
utor, exhibitor and laboratory all serve one 
big important purpose — to create free and 
wholesome competition — a necessity to any 
healthy industry. 

The men who go to make up Filmlab, Inc., 
have all been associated with the Independ- 
ents since their first appearance in the mov- 
ing picture business, and still are serving the 
Independent producer with the product of 
their many years of experience in negative 
developing, first prints, titles and animated 
titles. 

The spirit of competition among the lab- 
oratories brings forth better work, which is 
a direct benefit to the Independent pro- 
ducers and exhibitors who must have better 
pictures if they are to survive. 

Filmlab, Inc., wishes to extend its sin- 
cerest wishes for success to the I. M. P. D. 
D. A. and all of its members. 



Canadian Trustee Named 



Commerce Figures for February Set 
Value at $750,000 

Notice was given at Toronto on April 26 
of the authorization of a trusteeship for the 
United Exhibitors of Canada, Ltd., Toronto, 
with branches in five other Canadian cities, 
the trustee appointed under the order being 
the Capital Trust Company. This develop- 
ment followed soon after the announcement 
by Film Booking Offices regarding the estab- 
lishment of a direct chain of F. B. O. branch 
offices in Canada to take care of Canadian 
business. When United Exhibitors was or- 
ganized last summer, the distributing fran- 
chise for the Dominion of F. B. O. releases 
was obtained, but the United failed to secure 
pictures of much importance other than the 
F. B. O. line. Accordingly when F. B. O. 
decided to have its own chain of Canadian 
branches, the United passed into the hands 
of a trustee. 

Some months ago, announcement was 
made of the appointment of Phil. Hazza of 
Montreal, formerly with Universal, as gen- 
eral manager of United Exhibitors of Canada 
A few days ago the statement was broad- 
casted that Mr. Hazza had received the ap- 
pointment of Canadian general manager for 
Film Booking Offices, with headquarters at 
Toronto. Following this, United Exhibitors 
passed into the hands of a receiver. 



Goldwyn over the dividend requirements, 
which are reported to have been earned by 
its controlled theatres alone. Increased ef- 
ficiency and material economy of operations, 
due to the elimination of the present double 
overhead and the wider distributing facili- 
ties, should materially add to the earning 
power of Loew's. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



211 




Hodkinson's Eastern Sales 

Convention Is Enthusiastic 



Harry Carey in "The Lightning Rider." 
Distributed by W. W. Hodkinson Corpora- 
tion. 

Sign Waunda Wiley 

Waunda Wiley, the talented young come- 
dienne, has been signed by Julius and Abe 
Stern for featured parts in Century Come- 
dies. Miss Wiley has appeared in several 
comedies for Century and has proven her- 
self to be an actress of unusual ability. Her 
first production under the new contract will 
be "Bachelors," in which she will be fea- 
tured with Killiard Karr and Harry McCoy 
under the direction of Edward I. Luddy. 



THE first of the Hodkinson sales con- 
ventions, held on April 26 at the ex- 
ecutive offices of the company, was 
marked by spontaneous enthusiasm and the 
well founded optimism of the eastern sales 
chiefs. The convention was attended by all 
of the branch managers in the eastern di- 
vision, and the statements made by the ex- 
ecutives on the product coming for the 1924- 
25 season were received with applause and 
declarations by the branch representatives 
that the new pictures would triple and quad- 
ruple all past booking records in their re- 
spective territories. 

President F. C. Munroe addressed the con- 
vention on the subject of the tremendous 
financial obligations that the Hodkinson 
company had assumed in its contracts with 
the best of the independent producers. He 
pointed out that the commitments of the 
company ran into many millions of dollars, 
and that the executives of the company were 
cheerfully undertaking the obligations in the 
fullest confidence that product of the high- 
est class would find a ready market in every 
first-run theatre. 

"The Hodkinson Corporation is a service 
company," said Mr. Munroe, "and while we 
expect to make some money for ourselves, 
our first duty is to make money for our pro- 
ducers and to do that we must be sure that 
we contract with the best of the producers 
for the best of pictures that will make 
money for the exhibitors.'' 



Vice-president John C. Flinn told of the 
unceasing work that had been done since 
•January 1 in lining up the new product and 
the world-wide plans for exploiting the 
pictures. 

"The first thing we did," he said, "was to 
draw up a complete list of every reputable 
producer and then subject the list to a 
process of elimination. The list was boiled 
down to only those producers that had pos- 
itively established themselves as creators of 
money-making attractions and our negotia- 
tions for product were confined to those 
comparatively few men, with the result that 
we already have fifteen splendid attractions 
for release before August 1 and between 
thirty-six and forty great big pictures under 
contract for the 1924-25 season." 

Vice-president Paul C. Mooney presided 
over the session. He outlined the company's 
sales plans and policies and spoke of the re- 
action of the big exhibitors to the new Hod- 
kinson proposition. 

The branch managers attending included 
William Yoder of Atlanta, L. J. Hacking of 
Boston, W. H. Wagner of Buffalo, George 
Dillon of New York, W. C. Humphries of 
Philadelphia, G. R. Ainsworth of Pittsburgh, 
G. A. Falkner of Washington and J. L. Plow- 
right of Toronto. 

The second sales convention of the com- 
pany will be held in Chicago this week, pre- 
sided over by Mr. Munroe, Mr. Mooney and 
Mr. Flinn, with the central and western di- 
vision represented. 



Industry Needs 
and Directors 

CC^TT^ HE most urgent need in the mo- 
tion picture industry today is 
new blood in the directorial and 
writing fields." 

The statement was made by Richard A. 
Rowland, general manager of Associated 
First National Pictures, Inc., at a dinner he 
gave to his West Coast department heads on 
the eve of his and Earl Hudson's departure 
to New Orleans to attend the annual con- 
vention of First National franchise holders. 

Rowland, speaking on the splendid prog- 
ress made in the lighting, photographic and 
technical ends of the business, stated that all 
these three have reached a high level but 
that there is still much room for improve- 
ment in direction and writing. 

"There are comparatively few really out- 
standing directors in the business," he said. 
"As to writers — well, we are each day at- 
tracting a greater number of noted authors 
who are lending their talent toward raising 
the standard of the motion picture. The 
celluloid drama is no longer scoffed at by 
the other artists; indeed it is attracting them 
to its fold and is rapidly rising to the pin- 
nacle as the greatest of all the arts. 

"The writer, in my estimation, is the most 
important attribute to picture success, for 
after all is said and done the story that the 
motion picture tells is the keystone — direc- 
tion and acting are of secondary impor- 
tance.'' 

Mr. Rowland paid tribute to Earl J. Hud- 



New Writers 
Says Rowland 

son, supervisor of First National's own pro- 
duction units, and to John McCormick, 
western representative. Of Hudson he said: 
"He accomplished the most amazing thing 
in the history of pictures — he has made six 
successive noteworthy box office sensations. 
These were 'The Huntress,' 'Thundergate,' 
'Her Temporary Husband,' 'Painted People,' 
'Lilies of the Field' and 'Woman on the Jury,' 



and he now is guiding the destinies of three 
other pictures which promise to be equally 
as successful as any of the others. These 
are 'Sundown,' 'The Perfect Flapper' and 
'For Sale.' " 



Metro Buys "Rust 

Metro announces the purchase of "Rust," 
Robert R. Presnell's popular Broadway play, 
which will be filmed as one of the big pro- 
ductions on Metro's extensive schedule next 
season. The purchase was effected by 
Colonel J. E. Brady, in charge of Metro's 
Eastern scenario department, through Miss 
Laura D. Wilck, Mr. Presnell's agent. 




EASTERN SALES FORCE OF THE HODKINSON CORPORATION 
From left to right, top row — J. K. Burger, G. M. Davidson, H. O. Duke, J. L. Plow- 
right, J. Dolan, G. Solomon, D. Scholtz, L. Tobias, W. H. Wagner, G. R. Ainsworth 
and L. W. Kniskern. Second row — F. S. Hopkins, W. G. Humphries, J. C. Flinn, Paul 
Mooney, F. C. Munroe, R. Pawley, G. M. Dillon, G. A. Falkner, W. Yoder, G. Harvey. 
Bottom row — J. Eaton, J. Level, C. J. Giegerich, L. J. Hacking, C. Behan, R. S. Wolf, 
W. F. Seymour, P. J. Richrath, I. Hanover. 



Selling the Picture to the Public 



EDITED BY EPES WINTHROP SARGENT 



Bargain Month in Pictures Is Winner 

When You Have Real Pictures to Offer 



TAKING his cue from a story appear- 
ing in this department some time ago, 
H. B. Vincent, of the Phillips and 
Beacham theatres, Orlando, Fla., and his 
publicity man, Frank H. Burns, worked out 
a "revival" idea that sold like the first circus 
of the season. As Mr. Burns puts it: "It's 
good if you have the pictures to work with 
— and we sure had 'em." 

The original story related to a circuit up 
in New York State where a theatre anni- 
versary was marked by a bargain day at 
most of the leading stores. Mr. Burns con- 
ceived the idea of having a bargain month, 
prorating the cost between the two houses, 
over four weeks and just smashing things 
open. 

Fine Bills 

At the Phillips he had Flowing Gold, The 
Shooting of Dan McGrew, Reno, Name the 
Man, The Call of the Canyon, Stephen Steps 
Out, Nellie the Beautiful Cloak Model, 
Singer Jim McKee, Under the Red Robe, 
The Heritage of the Desert and Flaming 
Barriers. 

PICTURE SALE 



InounuHKdl THE BEACHAM AND 

PHILLIPS THEATRES OFFER I 



FOR YOUR APPROVAL E=^= 



A BIG BARGAIN MONTH 





Our First 
Annual (*l<»araiu*<» Sale 










EVERYTHING 
MUST BE SOLI) 


-bai it 1 — that. 




Wt muil reduce out itocb. We mui! f«i»e moory 
A real bona fid <■ ule The greatest programs no 
offered for the money Something to think about 

.AJ1 taojJtpU4|( ga. Nnlhing ryrrmngrA *i J*'*- 

You buy «hal you get and gel what you buy Talk 
about your shovel 'em out--. boy, we are going to 




Try to rt , v, 








fiSStoZ n pit 



The Greatest Month of Pictures Ever Offered in Orlando 



philuhs THEATRE ' 


SALE LASTS 

30 Days 

Come one, come all, and 

get more than your 
money'* worth in good 
entertainment 


PICTURES COMING TO THE 
BEACHAM THEATRE 


'Flawing Gold' 

•Tk. „l Du HcC>»- 
TW CaD of Ik* Ca-y»- 

W.Jham 1 Han a 
"Under the R<d So*.' 
TW Hentair at lW [ • 
"Flana* Bamm" 


-Wtwr. ■ Maa • • Maa" 

TW Sob of Saaan' 

Pol* rUcn m -)»■■■— d PbnV 

"TW Neat Can*/* 


LEI'S GO! 



Bang.' Bang! "BANG! 

THE THROWAWAY 

The list at the Beacham included When a 
Man's a Man, Three Weeks, The Son of 
Sahara, Shadows of Paris, The Common 
Law, A Boy of Flanders, The Next Corner, 
Mademoiselle Midnight and Sherlock, Jr. 

This looked like something to talk about, 
so Burns raised his voice to a shout and had 
a supply of throwaways printed, 12 by 18 
inches, headed "Picture Sale" in inch and a 



half letters and laid out precisely the same 
as a dry goods or grocery circular with "A 
Big Bargain Month" for his secondary line 
and "Our first annual clearance sale. Every- 
thing must be sold" for the slogan. 

Good Copy 

This last was followed by "We must re- 
duce our stock. We must raise money. A 
real bona fide sale. The greatest programs 
ever offered for the money. Something to 
think about. All goods must go. Nothing 
changed at this sale. You buy what you get 
and you get what you buy. Talk about your 
shovel 'em out — boy! we are going to shovel 
'em in.'' 

On one side of this, broken into two and 
three line panels, was "Something new in 
the movie line— 2,000 seats, 2,000 nails— If 
you can't get a seat we'll hang you on a 
nail in full view of the picture. We must 
have capacity houses. We have done our 
part. Now it's up to you— If you like our 
idea, prove it. Let's go — A whole month of 
big pictures. Wow!" 

There was more along the same lines on 
the other side of the central panel, with the 
program below. 

Wide Distribution 

Enough of these were printed to permit 
one to be placed in every house in Orlando 
and leave a supply for distribution in the 
theatres. To make doubly certain, there was 
a special mailing list of about 1,000 names 
used, and then each of the two local papers 
was given the copy as a full page. Appor- 
tioned between twenty titles and sixty days, 
this did not amount to much on any one 
picture, but it shot business the first half of 
April away above the mark with an upward 
tendency showing and Easter bringing the 
end of Lent. 

It has proven to be the cheapest advertis- 
ing the house has ever done and about the 
best, as well. 

If you try it. let the local merchants in on 
the deal, and get more noise for the same 
cost. 



Likes Dog Stories 

Apropos of a recent article on 
"dog stories," Morris Rosenthal, 
of Poli's Strand Theatre, Water- 
bury, Conn., sends in a story 
which recently ran in the Evening 
Democrat. It is headed "A Day 
at the Theatre: What It Means 
to You," and it tells interestingly 
of the precautions taken to en- 
sure the comfort of the patrons, 
how films are edited for local ap- 
proval, how the musical scores are 
arranged and all the details of 
house management. 

But through the story there 
run references to coming attrac- 
tions with especial mention of A 
Woman of Paris and Plasti- 
grams. These two features get 
more space than they probably 
could command as separate press 
items and appear as pure reading 
instead of the theatre's own an- 
nouncement, which generally is 
accepted at a discount. 

It carries more space than would 
be given these features and in ad- 
dition it gives a house story that 
is worth more than a page of 
purely press material, since it will 
be held to the house long after 
the immediate programs have 
been played and passed along. 

Very naturally Mr. Rosenthal 
agrees with this department that 
the dog story is well worth while. 
It always is when intelligently 
done. 



In every issue of this department you mill 
find ideas that arc worth many times the cost 
of a year's subscription. They will fit your 
particular house. Why not use them? It's 

money in the bank 



*LIUIE S 

OF THE 

FIELD" 



A First National Release 

ANOTHER GOOD BANNER FROM THE LIBERTY, PORTLAND 
"Another poor banner," would be a more startling line in connection with this Oregon 
house, for it specializes in banners, but we think this one for Lilies of the Field 
speaks for itself. It seems to use the litho cutouts plus very good lettering. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



213 



Production Hints from Edward L. Hyman 

Managing Director Mark-Strand Theatre, Brooklyn 



Empty Whiskey Cases 
Sold Three Miles Out 

Opening on a Friday to a sell-out business 
is the record for Three Miles Out at the 
Strand Theatre, Schenectady, N. Y., and it 
was not due to the fact that this was pay 
night in the General Electric Works, either, 
for the business held up the full week. 

William Shirley and A. De Wolf Weiller 
got hold of some empty whiskey cases and 
bottles to match. Just where they got them 
from is not essential to the story. They got 
them. 

First of all they loaded them on a truck 
and shot that around town for a few days 
before the opening with signs telling that 
it was a shipment of whiskey from Three 
Miles Out and that it would reach the Strand 
on Friday. The branded boxes were the real 
thing, but the barrel shown in the photo- 
graph had a false head. They don't handle 
it in barrels these days. For that matter the 
burlap bag has the preference over the 
wooden case, but that is a detail. 

Friday the perambultaor, with considerable 
ceremony, "delivered" the goods to the the- 
atre, where the boxes were stacked in the 
lobby with some of the bottles exposed. A 
man dressed as a barkeeper, with his apron 
lettered both front and back, would peram- 
bulate the street a few doors from the the- 
atre on either side, pausing now and then 
to open one of the bottles and sample the 
contents with visible and audible satisfaction. 

There was only standing room by eight 
o'clock the opening night, and half an hour 
later the only standing room was on the 
sidewalk, and that was fully occupied. Those 
empty whiskey cases were worth more than 
the full ones, even at the present prices. 



Likes Ed. Ads. 

F. B. O. is pointing with pride to an ed- 
itorial style advertisement on The Beloved 
Vagabond. 

This is in effect a reading advertisement 
fixed up with a heading similar to the box 
heads used on many types of editorial copy. 
Being in reading form, it is easier to hold 
the attention than with the usual selling talk. 
Probably no one will be deceived as to the 
fact that it is an advertisement, but it looks 
inviting. 



OPPORTUNITY was given by the 
show opening Easter Sunday for a 
timely musical incident in keeping 
with the season, which was used at the 
opening of each de luxe performance. This 
was the Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's 
"The Messiah," with eight feminine singers 
in special set. There were two other musi- 
cal numbers, the more elaborate of which 
was an impression of "The Gondoliers." The 
feature photoplay was "When a Man's a 
Man" (First National), and the fillers were 
the Topical Review and a novelty film, 
"Rapid Transit," with some of the scenes 
secured in front of the theatre. 

These six incidents took up two hours and 
ten minutes, the feature itself requiring one 
hour and sixteen minutes. 

For the Hallelujah Chorus the singers 
were garbed in cassocks, and stood before 
the gold draw curtains of the production 
stage. At a fortissimo in the music the cur- 
tains opened, showing a huge church window 
transparency back drop with a white cross 
at top center. Red open box lamps were 
behind the window. For the opening the 
lights included orange and lemon spots on 
the singres; two light green floods covering 
the fabric side drapes and orchestra from 
the booth; one rose purple and one light 
amber flood from the dome on the musicians. 
Light amber transparent windows at either 
side; blue foots and borders, with columns 
at proscenium arch orange bottoms and 
light blue tops. When the curtains opened 
the lights dimmed off and overhead light 



Beat the Weather 

They have been enjoying a muchly mixed 
brand of weather down in Texas, but that 
did not keep the crowds from the Palace 
Theatre, Fort Worth, when Barry Burke 
staged a style show for a local store and 
The Stranger. 

The store sent out 4,000 heralds with their 
announcement of the show and used 30,000 
as package stuffers. After that it could 
have rained twice as hard without materially 
affecting the receipts. And at that it was 
raining so hard that they were considering 
a switch to bathing suits. 



blue spots covered the singers. This presen- 
tation took seven minutes. 

"Ah No Turridu," from Mascagni's "Caval- 
leria Rusticana," was sung by tenor and so- 
prano in correct operatic costume. Painted 
back drop of church front, with house to 
the left, both dimly lighted by deep blue box 
lamps from the side. Straw and orange side 
spots hit the singers. Front lighting in- 
cluded rose pulple flood from the dome on 
the orchestra; blue foots and borders; red 
coves, green and magenta entrance spots 
hitting the ceiling and tops of the windows. 
Time of presentation, seven minutes. 

"The Gondoliers" offered seven selections, 
as follows : "Roses White and Red," opening 
ensemble ; "Kind Sir You Cannot Have the 
Heart," soprano ; "Duke of Plaza-Toro," 
baritone; "Bury Bury," soprano and tenor; 
"A Regular Royal Queen,'' mixed quartette; 
"Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes," tenor; 
Dance a Ca Chucha, ballet and ensemble. 
Five principals, singing chorus of eight, and 
ballet of six was used, the incident running 
fifteen minutes. Back drop of Venice show- 
ing gondola, and set stone benches, balus- 
trades and lanterns hung from above. Silver 
ribbons suspended at six-inch intervals in 
front of the back drop. Flowers entwined 
in the balustrades. Front lighting included 
two deep blue Mestrum floods, 150 amperes, 
over all; deep blue Mestrum flood on musi- 
cians from the dome; red coves. Amber 
flood on the set from the dome, with artists 
lighted by side and overhead spots of straw, 
orange and amber. 



Betty Called 

Something of a variant on the calling card 
stunt was worked by Howard Waugh, of 
Loew's Palace Theatre, Memphis. This card 
was on colored stock 2 by S]/ 2 inches, with 
a head of Miss Compson (without caption), 
and an eighteen point "I called on you to- 
day" in two lines. Below was a six point 
"The Stranger" in quote marks, and lower 
down "Meet me next week. Loew's Palace. 
Betty Compson" in three short lines. The 
chief advantage of this form is that it car- 
ries the cut. 




An Atsociated Exhibitors' Relecse 

TANTALIZING A THIRSTY PUBLIC IN SCHENECTADY WITH BOTTLES FROM THREE MILES OUT 
William Shirley and A. De Wolf Veiller, of the Strand Theatre, S chenectady, got hold of some old whiskey cases and after running 
them around town on a bootlegging truck for a few days, set them up in the lobby of the house with a bartender to guard them. 
They are used the perambulating street car, but the boxes packed the house for a solid week. 



214 MOVING PICTURE WORLD May 10, 1924 




Newspaper Notices 
Helped Small Town 

When The Hunchback of Notre Dame was 
booked into the Walker Theatre, Santa 
Anna, Calif., Hal Reed, the Universal ex- 
ploiter in that section framed up the San 
Francisco notices on a neat panel for i 
special display. 



A Fox Release 

THE FAST MAIL IS NOW TOURING SOUTH AMERICAN TRACKS 

This is the lobby decoration in the Isis Theatre, Rio de Janeiro. It does not give 
the "toda" much trackage, but it was enough to pull in the business. The engine is 
cut out and placed before the scenery. Note the awning over the tender. 




Puts Kick in Sign 
With a Laugh Idea 

When Ace Berry, of the Circle Theatre, 
Indianapolis, came to play Painted People, 
he asked for something different in the way 
of signs. He figured that Colleen Moore 
should pull them in with her hit in Flaming 
Youth still fresh in mind, so he wanted to 
give her the fullest publicity. 

Ben Caldwell, the house artist, found a 
clever idea and the sign arrested the atten- 
tion of everyone. 

Across the top of the foyer he placed a 
pair of panels, one for the star and a ref- 
erence to her earlier big hit, with the title 
on the other. In between was a head of the 
star. That was all regular and common- 
place enough, though attractively done. 

But then the laugh came in. There was 
a radiator just below the head, and Caldwell 
ran a small practical ladder from the top af 
the radiator to the ledge of the border. On 
this he placed the cutout figure of an artist 
touching up the red lips of the portrait. 

It made the entire offering something dif- 
ferent and got more attention than any sign 
Mr. Berry has had in the lobby in many 
months. 



Paid for Passes 

Earl Settle, of McAlester, Okla., not only 
sold the clothing store on free passes with 
each Jackie Coogan suit, but he sold them 
the idea of buying the passes — which is even 
better. It made extra sales for Long Live 
the King, and it got the show a lot of free 
advertising, both in and out of the news- 
papers. 



A Universal Release 

THE MISSOURI STYLE 

Each heading was lettered in imitation of 
the newspaper's head, and while it was not 
easy to read the small type, the headline* 
told the story, and the space given did the 
rest. 

A nice touch was the hand printing press 
set in the foreground to get attention and to 
suggest the printed word. It made a simple 
and very efficient attractor. 




lour Dws > >j 



Girl Carries Banner 

William Epstein, of the Royal Theatre, 
Laredo, Texas, has selected a mascot in the 
person of a very attractive Mexican girl 
referred to by Walter Eberhardt as "one of 
those bewitching senoritas," though she is 
just a pleasant faced Mex kiddie. 

Anyhow Epstein uses her for all the big 
First Nationals and by tying her only to the 
good ones, she means "go" just as surely as 
does the traffic cop's signal. 



slow Showing Tour [U«S Ij ^ 

Baby Peggy 

cjhe Darliae ol the Screen - - Sweeter iron ever in t 

LAW FORBIDS 



WJ 



A Universal Release 

THIS ROOSTER CROWED FOR BABY PEGGY'S PLAY 

It's a live rooster and a cutout Peggy to tell of The Law Forbids in the lobby of the 
Franklin Theatre, New York City. J. Fotheringham, the manager, planned the display, 
which got more attention than the best straight litho show. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



215 



Novelty Front 

for Fair Week 

Russell B. Moon, Paramounteer, arranged 
a trick front for Fair Week which is being 
loaned with the picture in the Boston book- 
ing district. It is made of compoboard, 
painted in red and white stripes, in simula- 
tion of a concession tent with a pair of one 
sheets worked in. It made its debut at the 
Victory Theatre, Providence. 



NASN ENTRANCE 





A Universal Release 

THIS RACE WAS FIXED. BUT THE THEATRE WAS A WINNER 
The Princess Theatre, Denver, used automobiles on a circular frame to get over the 
idea of Sporting Youth, the cars passing back of the ground through tunnel openings. 
Two or more sets at different speeds would be even better, but this worked. 



A. Paramount Release 



MOON'S FAIR WEEK TENT 

In the entrance is seen a peep show, 
familiar at carnivals and amusement parks. 
This has six eye-pieces, with as many dis- 
plays. One is a slide for the attraction, 
lighted from behind by a cardboard at an 
angle. The others are tricks including 
"What helped to build the White House," 



which is a nail on a bed of purple satin ; 
"A Slippery Affair," in the shape of a domed 
teapot, and a bottle of tobasco for "Hot 
Stuff." 

Everyone knows that it is a sting, but they 
all want to see, and there is a crowd around 
the display all of the time. 

Moon also made a wheel of fortune, with 
a card at the top "Fair Week Is the Winner 
This Week." That and the titles of forth- 
coming chows are lettered upon the wheel, 
which is bound to stop at some winner in 
conformity with the sign "Everyone a Win- 



ner." There are no prizes. You just have 
the fun of spinning the wheel, but someone 
keeps it going all the time. 




Box Office Mask 

Is Big Newspaper 

Leslie Whelan, Paramounteer, planned a 
newspaper nine feet high for A Society 
Scandal at the Olympia, Pittsburgh. This 
was hand-painted in close simulation of the 
regular newspaper with red headlines and 
everything, but it improved on the usual 
sheet in that the portraits were in color, be- 
ing taken from the regular lithographs. 

A hole was cut in the center for the ticket 
sales, but this did not interfere with the 
headlines. 

It is cleverly done and had the people 
lined up on the sidewalk reading the head- 
lines, while others bought tickets. 



A Paramount Release 



GETTING THE NEWS ABOUT GLORIA BEFORE THE PUBLIC 
This newspaper mask for the box office stands nine feet high, with the headlines in 
red and black, the illustrations being from the regular posters. It was planned by 
Leslie Whelan, Paramounteer, for the Olympic Theatre, Pittsburgh. 



Tied Up Two 

Getting two tie-ups helped the Hippodrome 
Theatre, York, Pa., sell a pair of First Na- 
tionals recently. 

The plugger song for The Song of Love 
was fastened to a ten-cent store with a big 
window display and a banner across the en- 
trance, while right next door a banner for 
Ponjola ran across the entire front, in con- 
nection with the sale of the book from which 
the picture was made. Neither interfered 
with the other, so both releases went over to 
improved business. 

One good tie-up is better than three or 
four inconspicuous ones, and both of these 
carried front banners in addition to the win- 
dow displays. 



Look after your Summer Exploitation 
now before it is too late. 



216 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 




A Paramount Release 



THEY GROW LARGE HUMMING BIRDS IN OKLAHOMA 
This is a lobby by S. S. Wallace, of the Criterion Theatre, Oklahoma City, on Gloria 
Swanson in The Humming Bird. Wallace may be a bit weak on ornithology, but he 
knows a good lobby display when he sees one. This is one. 



Likes Questionnaire 

L. O. Davis, of the Virginia Theatre, 
Hazard, Ky, sends in a questionnaire which 
he says helps him keep tabs on the local 
demand. It is along familiar lines, but it 
is a long time since one drifted in to this 
department. Apparently they are not as gen- 
erally used as they were some years ago, 
though they are a great help in a small 
town and, as Mr. Davis points out, they 
check up the mailing list. 

The patron is asked to underscore the 
classes of plays he prefers, the classifica- 
tion being Western, Melodrama, Comedy- 
Drama, Society Drama, Northern pictures 
and Sea Stories. The favorite stars are 
named for first, second and third choices, 
and there is a blank for any suggestion the 
patron cares to offer, with space for signa- 
ture and address. 

On the reverse is a request to fill in the 
blank and leave it at the box office or send 
it in by mail. In the past managers have 
found a better response where a single pass 
is given for the turning in of the question- 
naire, the pass being given for an off night. 

Have you checked up your patrons 
lately? 



"On the Air" 

Radio is not the only thing on the air. 
Bunches of airplanes cut through the 
Hertzian waves. Theodore Mousson hitched 
the airplanes to his stars and for the 105th 
Aviation Unit to advertise The Broken 
Wing at his Knickerbocker Theatre, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Four planes distributed his throwaways, 
and more than two hundred cars accepted 
the pasteboard signs prepared by the service 
men for a recruiting drive which centered 
about an airplane parked in front of the 
Knickerbocker. 

Just to be in the game, the city permitted 
215 safety zone and parking signs to be 
pasted with special stickers similar to those 
used on the automobiles. 

The house got more men than the recruit- 
ing service, but both sides seem to be well 
content. 



Qualified 

You could not well ask a better hook-up 
to a fashion show than The Lilies of the 
Field, and yet the first style show to be re- 
ported comes from the Palace Theatre, San 
Antonio, where Manager Santikes put on 
a display with twenty mannequins. 

The store which supplied the garments not 
only paid all expenses but hired a dancing 
master to teach the models their paces. It 
put the Lilies over to about as good busi- 
ness as the house ever had. 



Piped a Piper 

About 200 children were hired with passes 
to follow a pied piper through the streets of 
Atlanta to advertise Pied Piper Malone at 
the Howard Theatre. Kingsmore borrowed 
the Coogan-Barry idea and got the young- 
sters from a local orphan asylum. The line 
was led by a goat cart with the three small- 
est children getting a ride. 




Emergency Office 

to Suggest Rush 

Among the other stunts worked on the 
premiere of Secrets at Los Angeles was one 
that will last beyond this Talmadge feature. 
It is the emergency box office. The idea is 
not altogether new, for there have been iso- 
lated instances of their use before this, 
either in the lobby or at the curb. The 
angle which makes this new is the fact that 
the box office was located half a block from 
the theatre, to lessen the standout around 
the lobby. 

The first night the box was purely orna- 
mental, for the advance had exhausted the 
capacity, but later in the week the office 
not only did business but helped to make 
the business. People figured that if they 
had to lure the crowd from the main en- 
trance there must be a show worth while. 
They bought tickets on the urge as well as 
because it was Norma Talmadge. 

The opening night they had to establish 
fire lines 200 feet from the house to hold 
back the crowd which had gathered to see 
the celebrities enter. That helped, too, and 
all told Secrets was given a start that was 
good even for Los Angeles, where the press 
agent is working under the eagle eye of his 
employers. 



Here Ain't the Bride 

Guy Kenimer, of the Arcade Theatre, 
Jacksonville, had it all set for a stage wed- 
ding for The Marriage Circle — all except the 
contracting pair. 

A leading jeweler offered a real platinum 
wedding ring and another 1. j. countered 
with a wrist watch. Other donations were 
for the house or to deck the bride and for 
two weeks Kenimer whooped it up like a 
bull moose calling to its mate, but no one 
seemed keen to get married and so instead 
of "Here Comes the Bride" the orchestra 
had to play "Yes, We Have No Bananas." 

But they could not take away the benefits 
of two weeks of advance work and the 
crowd which had gathered for the wedding 
went out and talked the rest of the town 
into not missing one of the best entertain- 
ment bets of the year. 

— -—■■•J--- - - f I -| 







BuE Kj6itft ^/j^U DEVILLED viaw R Mi^lai H SK^ l HHTRmJC 

Jl yf yK T ALyL ^ V OOL. HOUSE and his Cowbqy Band. OaW 



A. Universal Release 



HOW MOSS' BROADWAY THEATRE BANNERED THE FOOL'S HIGHWAY 
Those blotches against the front are some of the Japanese lanterns used to give local 
color under the marquise. You see this is a Bowery story and Chinatown is at the 
lower end of that once-famous street, hence the lanterns. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



217 



This Open Layout 
Gets Best Display 

These two advertisements from the Strand 
Theatre, Syracuse, speak for themselves. 
One is five inches over three and the other 
is seven inches in the same width. The five 
inch space is more than twice as large as the 
seven when it gets right down to a matter 
of attention getting. The smaller space car- 




better than a full face. This is by no means 
a poor display, though it lacks the kick of 
the rule work. It is fairly open, and the 
heavy border, with the rather vague cuts 
give strength to the layout which enables it 
to do better than hold its own, though it 
does not dominate the page like the other 
example. Syracuse printers seem to have a 
fair idea of amusement display. Possibly it 
has been drilled into them, but they do not 
run to the all-capital excesses common in 
so many midium sized towns. They give a 
generally fair result, and when they have the 
proper material to work with, as in this case, 
they show something better than the aver- 
age, but they do not yet seem to realize that 
with a heavy frame to hold a space to itself, 
the too-black type faces are not needed to 
give emphasis. When they learn that, their 
work will be even better. It is better than 
average as it stands. 



A First National Release 

OPEN AND INSISTENT 

ries no cuts and depends upon white and 
the heavy rules to get attention. It stands 
up on the page to the exclusion of all else, 
for it was sent in as a full page to show this 
advantage. The card in the lower corner 
regarding no advance in prices is a holdover 
from The White Sister, which was played at 
a 75 cent top. Otherwise that space would 
have been better used for the additional 
features, which would then have permitted 
the better playing up of the cast of the fea- 
ture. Under the circumstances the return to 
the regular prices was of greater importance 
than the cast. The printer has intelligently 
used upper and lower case instead of all 
upper for most of the lines, and this is easier 
to read. The same comment holds true of 
the display for The White Sister, where 
only the title is in all capitals. The chief 
objection to this layout is the use of full 



Remade Sunday Ads 
to Get Full Value 

Raymond Jones, of the publicity end of 
the Howard Theatre, Atlanta, remade his 
Sunday displays four times to get the best 
result and figured it worth his while. The 
attraction was A Society Scandal, and he 
got the idea of making his attractor a re- 
production of the front page of each news- 
paper in which the advertisement appeared. 
He obtained permission from each of the 
three newspapers to use their heading, and 
miniature newspapers were set up, the 
make-up being changed for each paper, 
though the general story ran in all three. 
Before the plates could be delivered, the 
papers — all three of them — notified Mr. 



Jones that the permission was rescinded, 
each editor feeling that such a use of the 
heading might suggest that the paper was 
a scandal sheet. Jones tried hard to smile, 
junked the plates and had a second edition 
with a fake heading to run in all three ads. 
But he was not content with the check. He 
went out and finally persuaded the Consti- 
tution to permit its heading to be run. He 
felt that the heading of an actual newspaper 
would give the display more punch than to 
use a dummy heading. The new plates were 
sent around. Then the Journal and the 
American, seeing that the Constitution did 
not object, changed their minds. Jones 
caught one form as it was being taken from 
the stereotypers to the press for the bulldog, 
or early edition, and had the original plate 
set in. The Journal was held up thirty min- 
utes for the change of plates, the first in- 
stance where such a concession was made 
to a theatrical advertiser. But when the ad- 
vertisements came out and Jones got sundry 
slaps on the back, he knew that his idea was 
the correct one and that the actual news- 
paper headings were sufficiently novel to 
more than justify his effort and the cost of 
the plates. We reproduce two of the dis- 
plays, the third not'being available. It will 
be noted that while they follow a general 
scheme, they are not identical. Cut place- 
ment, the use of a solid cut at the bottom 
of one space and of a straight block on the 
other, and the tilting of the page all serve 
to give the displays a different appearance- 
so that in the event of the same reader see- 
ing more than one newspaper, he gets a 
fresh appeal from the second. The Journal 
display is ISO by 3 and the Constitution is 
five lines deeper. We don't blame Mr. 
Jones for feeling rather proud of this effort. 
It is above the average from every angle. 




A Metro Release 

LARGER BUT SMALLER 

face in the smaller sizes, which makes it 
difficult to read quickly. Where there is 
so little to fight, a Roman would have been 
better and would then have given a little 
more emphasis to the larger lines. It is sel- 
dom a good thing to give too great an em- 
phasis to the advanced prices. An italic is 



ftomatd 



A Paramount Release 



TWO DISPLAYS FROM THE HOWARD THEATRE, ATLANTA, USING 

ACTUAL HEADS 



218 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



Loose Construction 
Hurts This Appeal 

The Pantheon Theatre, Vincennes, Ind., 
takes four twelves to put over The Eternal 
City and with an area of 96 square inches 
gives only 5 square inches to the title, stick- 
ing it so close to the cut that the display is 
further lessened. More than this, the title 
is widely separated from the selling talk. 



"Today, The Eternal City" is what you have 

to sell, sell it all in one breath. 



PANTHEON-TODAY 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY 

THE PICTURE 
YOU HAVE 
WAITED TO SEE, 
HERE TODAY 



Added Attraction 

The Newport Symphonic Orchestra 




HISSJRFKE eDnM-KOTRA.NO aUU'lsi 

addition to thi* tkJiibtfAl program ot The Orchestra 
Hid ThU FKAXLP^ EXTRAORDINARY 



"MAMMA'S 

BABY BOY" 



on SumUr Blffcl 



A First National Release 

POORLY LAID OUT 
The advertisement starts o ffwith the state- 
ment that "The picture you waited to see 
here today with" and names the cast. Then 
there is a lot of talk about an orchestra 
and, purely as an afterthought, the title is 
stuck in to balance the shorter features. A 
better layout would be to rout the top part 
of the cut, so that it ends with the circle. 
This would give space to run "The picture 
you have waited to see" in a single line with 
"The Eternal City" in a large face just be- 
low. Then the cast could be run and some 
chat about the immensity of the production 
before going on to sell the remainder of the 
program. If the orchestra is going to do the 
selling, the picture should have been cut 
down. If it is the picture that is to sell — 
and we think it is — then the orchestra should 
be made secondary to the feature, holding 
the talk of that feature all in one place. It 
looks as though the copy writer had pasted 
up the cut and then had run lines wherever 
he could, without much regard for their sell- 
ing value. Probably the title was lettered 
on the cut, in which case it should have been 
notched out for this layout. It sounds like 
a lot of work, but a hacksaw and a mill file 
will do the trick, if the office is not equipped 
with a power cutter, and a much better sell- 
ing appeal could have been made. As a 
matter of fact the best cut use would have 
been just the Coliseu/n scene and the inset. 
That is plenty of picture, and the remainder 
of the space with well-set type would have 
been much better. Don't feel that you have 
to use all of a cut just because a kind ex- 
change sends it to you, and don't run your 
ads like a chapter play with a "to be con- 
tinued" line under the selling talk and the 
title down at the other end of the space. If 



Roy Miller Uses 

Type for Novelty 

According to the press story sent in with 
this display from the California Theatre, 
Los Angeles, Roy Miller has turned to type 
for a novelty. That is stating the matter 
rather broadly, for Mr. Miller has been 
using type off and on for some time. The 
real meat of the matter is found in the 
statement that the Los Angeles papers can 
give only a limited — very limited — number 
of small type faces to their advertisers. They 
have a few faces that do well enough for 
dry goods ads, but they do not carry on 
the machines or even in the cases the slight- 
ly ornamental faces that make for attractive- 
ness. In the language of the press story 
Roy Miller had the title hand lettered and 
then he went to a "professional typographer" 
and had the rest set up. A typographer, if 
you never met such an animal, is a man who 
specializes in typesetting. He has no print 
shop, but he will set up a job and send it 
over to your printer. There are very few 
of these men, but there are some, and they 
are to be found only in the larger cities. 
Miller took his job to one of these men, got 
clean proofs of the matter and pasted in on 
his cut copy, having the entire job repro- 
duced. If you will look this reproduction 
over closely you will see that there is not 
a line of straight Roman in the entire space. 
It is all slightly fancy and yet not so fancy 
that it is not clearly legible. Nelson B. Bell 
adopted this suggestion of ours a couple of 
years ago, and Milt D. Crandall has gone a 
step further. He laid in his own type faces 
for the Rowland & Clark houses, since he 
could not get what he wanted from the 
printer. If you want to do a combination 
and cannot get what you want from the 
newspaper office, get some job plant to set 
up your lines. They are more apt to have 
good faces in the smaller sizes. In Los 
Angeles this departure from hand work is 
getting attention because these California 
spaces are incomparably better. In Pitts- 
burgh Crandall has had the field entirely to 
himself until lately. In Washington Bell has 



been doing tricks with type he could not do 
in straight mortises. And you can do pre- 
cisely what Miller, Crandall and Bell are 
doing at comparatively small cost and beat 
hand lettering competitors with little effort. 
It can be done, because it is being done. 
Why not get in line, if you have hand let- 
tering problems? 



Fanfotos Again 

There has been little to report about fan- 
fotos since the Paromunteers started in to 
hibernate, but apparently they are still be- 
ing used, and to good advantage. 

For example, L. R. Towns, of the Strand 
Theatre, Birmingham, handed 500 pictures 
of Pola Negri to the big department store. 
In return they gave him a little more than 
five column inches in their display with a 
cut of the star and the announcement that 
they would present 500 copies of the auto- 
graphed photograph of Pola Negri to visitors 
to their women's section, adding that Negri 
in The Shadows of Paris would be seen at 
the Strand all of the week. 

The value of this advertising lies in the 
fact that it puts the announcement where 
the women who are not reading the amuse- 
ment advertising cannot help seeing it. It 
helped Towns fight a Shriners' Street Circus 
and the fact that The Humming Bird had 
recently been shown. That was why Towns 
donated the pictures. He knew he would 
nave to hustle to lighten his handicap. 



Odd Teasers 

Frank L. Browne put out something dif- 
ferent in teasers when he had Twenty-one 
at the Liberty Theatre, Long Beach, Cat 

He had 5,000 diamond shaped cards printed 
up with : "Look for 21 opposite the P. E. 
station." These were put on all telegraph 
poles and other possible tack locations. Of 
course the Liberty was across the street 
from the station, and it was blazoned with 
announcements. 

He also used throwaways to tie in on this, 
making the more definite statement that the 
title was at the Liberty. 



California 

MAIN A,ft,„ ~mm ^ 

affc 



The colorful romance of History's 

most arrogant heart-breaker! 



World Premier! 

Noui Playing 
Popular Prices 





— ill* Foremost Actor of our 
day in Richard MansfielA'i 
most celebrated itage success. 



BcauBrummcl 



£y***HE life rtory of the moit Insolent, the mot 
( <"\ daring, the moat feared man in all the nocial 
V/ history of Europe. He act the fathioru for 
■ continent: poked fun at hi* Prince; toad* 
love with reckleu abandon and •corned every 
love — he T*'fyh*^ at Life and sneered at Fate. 

Mu*U all j inurfntuti by 

ELINOR'S 

Iimpi| JrabU Concert Orthextrm 

A WARNER BROS. SCREEN CLASSIC 



A Warner Brothers Release 
THE SOLUTION OF THE HAND LETTERED PROBLEM. NOTE THESE LINES 




Newest Reviews and Comments 



"Listen Lester" 



Principal Offers Pleasing Picture With Cast 
of Favorites Based on Musical Comedy 
Reviewed by C. S. Sevvell 

A popular musical comedy, "Listen Lester," 
which enjoyed a long run on the New York 
stage a few seasons ago has been transferred 
to the screen by Principal Pictures Corpora- 
tion. Like most productions of this type 
where musical numbers play a large part, the 
story interest is slight and hardly to be 
taken seriously, simply serving as a basis for 
the action and incidents. 

"Listen Lester" concerns the adventures 
of a gay old widower who is pursued by 
one of his former flames who threatens him 
with a breach of promise suit and most of 
the footage as screened deals with the at- 
tempts of different parties he has employed 
to get posession of a package of letters. This 
is played up along farce comedy lines and 



Ohe Oscar C. ^ 

Buchheister Co. ( Unc. 

ART TITLES] 

Printed/Jitles 6^ Special Gffectsj 
\ 245 V/. 55 th St. J 
\ New York. City / 
\ Circle 624 O - 1 / 



RECENT PRODUCTIONS 
TITLED BY US 

"WANDERER OF 
THE WASTELAND" 

A ZANE GREY STORY IN 
TECHNICOLOR 



'YOLANDA" 



EDITED BY CHARLES S. SEWELL 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Bluff (Paramount) 
Girl of the Limberlost, The (F. B. 
O.) 

Listen Lester (Principal) 
Lone Wolf, The (Associated Ex- 
hibitors) 

Ridgeway of Montana (Universal) 
Untamed Youth (F. B. O.) 
Wandering Husbands ( Hod kin - 
son) 



the manner in which the letters continually 
change hands between the female detective, 
the hotel clerk and the house detective al- 
though providing amusement is at times 
overplayed. The title refers to the way all 
of the principals continually seek the aid of 
the house detective, Lester. 

To offset the widower's trouble with his 
former sweetheart there is a romance be- 
tween his daughter and a young millionaire, 
which, however, threatens to go on the rocks 
and is saved by the introduction of a fake 
kidnapping which brings both the young man 
and the widower to the matrimonial alter. 
This provides a melodramatic situation in- 
volving an attack on the daughter by one 
of the kidnappers and her rescue, leading 
to the happy ending. The sudden realization 
of the old man that he loves the woman he 
has sought to get away from is not convinc- 
ing. 

Everyone of the cast is a well-known 
player with a name of box-office value, such 
as Harry Myers, Louise Fazenda, Alec 
Francis, Eva Novak, George O'Hara, Lee 
Moran and Dot Farley and all give good per- 
formances. The picture has been capably 
directed by William Seiter. Judicious cutting 
would speed up some of the scenes which are 
a trifle long. 

The popularity of the stage production and 
the prominence of the players offer good 
points for advance work, while the picture 
itself will afford light pleasing entertain- 
ment for the majority of patrons. 

Cast 

Listen Lester Harry Myers 

Arbutus Qullty Louise Fazenda 



Col. Dodtre Alec Frnncla 

Mary Dodge Eva Novak 

Jack Griffin George O'Hara 

Wm. Penn Lee Mornn 

Miss Pink Dot Farley 

Scenario by Louise Milestone. 
Directed by Wm. A. Seiter. 
Length, 6,242 feet. 

Story 

Colonel Dodge, a gay old widower la 
threatened with a breach of promise suit by 
Arbutus Quilty. He hires Pink, a woman de- 
tective, to get back his letters and goes to 
Florida with his daughter Mary to get away 
from Arbutus, but she follows. He invokes the 
aid of Lester, the house detective to get the 
letters. Lester succeeds, Pink gets them 
from him, the clerk gets them from her 
and they are the cause of a general mix-up 
until Arbutus gets them back. Mary has 
fallen in love with Jack, but is jealous of 
the colonel not knowing he is her father. 
Arbutus has a scheme to bring the men to 
terms by being kidnapped. Lester aids them 
and the plot works. One of the men gets 
rough but Jack saves Mary. Arbutus, thor- 
oughly contrite decided to quit chasing the 
colonel and he immediately decides that she 
is the right wife for him, so all ends happily. 



"Just Off Times Square" 


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SAMPLE PRINTING 
TITLES 

BEST QUALITY ONLY 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 
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POWERS BUILDING 
Cor. 48th St. & Seventh Ave. 



POWERS FILM 

"Survives The Long Run" 

Ask your laboratory to tell you about its brilliancy and sparkle — 
its faithful reproduction of tones, of light and shade, no matter 
how delicate — its increased durability. 

POWERS FILM PRODUCTS, INC. 



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Factory & Laboratories: 
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224 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



"Ridgeway of Montana" 

Jack Hoxie's Newest Feature for Universal 
Should Provide Good Entertainment in 
Average House 
Reviewed by C. S. Sevrell 

Jack Hoxie's newest picture for Universal, 
"Ridgeway of Montant," is a pleasing pro- 
duction which should prove a good program 
attraction in the average theatre and be well 
liked by the star's admirers. 

The action of the picture takes place al- 
most entirely in the broad expanses of the 
west and there are a number of the familiar 
ingredients of the typical western such as a 
gang of cattle rustlers with a villainous leader 
who seeks to force his attentions on the 
heroine but who is thwarted by the hero 
who is a rancher. It will be seen that 
so far it is in the class of the typical west- 
ern, but these elements have been sub- 
ordinated in the footage to the romance 
angle. 

This romance, which embraces a majority 
of the footage, concerns the attempt of a 
modern flapper who wants all men to fall 
for her and who is piqued when the hero 
does not prove an easy prey. Although im- 
pressed by her, he pretends that he is not, 
and when she follows him to his mountain 
cabin he treats her with more or less dis- 
dain, even after marrying her to save her 
reputation. The attempt of the leader of 
the rustlers to kidnap her, however provides 
opportunities for a rescue and straightens 
everything out O. K. 

The supporting cast is entirely adequate, 
and there are a number of attractive and 
well photographed exteriors. Hoxie, as the 
ranch owner, has a congenial role with op- 
portunities for good riding scenes including 
the subduing of a spirited horse, a rescue in 
a runaway and a good fight, also a unique 
stunt where he hides in a wagon and lets it 
roll down hill crashing into a house. This is 
thrilling if not entirely convincing. Olive 
Hasbrouck is vivacious, attractive and 
thoroughly likable as the heroine. 

Altogether, "Ridgeway of Montana" is a 
pleasing picture with a good mixture of 
typical western, modern flapper-vamp and 
cowboy-caveman stuff, with stunts, thrills, 
humor, good riding and fighting to make it 
a thoroughly likable attraction for the aver- 
age patron. 

Cast 

Buck Ridgeway Jack Hoxie 

Aline Hanley Olive Hasbrouck 

sim .u Hanley Herbert Fortier 

Steve Pelton Lou Meehan 

Rev. McNabb C. E. Tburston 

Pete Shagmire Pat Harmon 

Story by W. MacLeod Raine* 
Scenario by E. II. .chnyer. 
Photographed by Harry Neumann. 
Lei Kth, 4,843 feet. 

Story 

Buck Ridgeway, owner of thousands of 
cattle in Montana captures a rustler band, 
but Pelton the leader makes a daring get- 
away. Buck goes to the city to sell the cattle 
and Aline, his friend's daughter, a flirt, de- 
cides to make him fall for her. Buck feels 
himself slipping and returns home, going up 
into the hills after Pelton. Aline, her vanity 



"Stories for the Children, Drama for the 
Grown-Ups." — N. Y. Herald 

Original Drama Written 
for the Screen 
Adaptations Made 

E. E. BURSON, Cineo-Dramatist 
261 So. Burlington Ave. Lot Angeles, Cal 



wounded, follows, gets lost, Buck finds her 
and takes her to his cabin. A snowstorm 
prevents their going back down the trail 
that night, and the next day Buck, appar- 
ently against his will, marries Aline. She 
seizes the first opportunity to escape, but Is 
kidnapped by Pelton. Buck starts after her 
and rescues her, capturing Pelton. They find 
they love each other and are perfectly sat- 
isfied with her position as Mrs. Ridgeway. 



MUSICIANS SHOULD FOLLOW 



The Lone Wolf 



» 



Jack Holt and Dorothy Dalton Come Under 
Associated Exhibitors Banner in 
Good Crook Picture 
Reviewed by Beatrice Barrett 

All lovers of crook mystery stories are fa- 
miliar with the "Lone Wolf" tales, and they 
are universally popular. When combined 
with this you have a cast headed by Jack 
Holt and Dorothy Dalton, assisted by such 
popular players as Tyrone Power and Wil- 
ton Lackaye, you have something to talk 
to the public about in which they will be 
interested. 

"The Lone Wolf" is a picture which will 
be liked by nearly everyone. It is well 
handled to make it a thrilling, baffling mys- 
tery story, full of suspense and unexpected 
happenings that will keep the audience in a 
constant state of excitement. 

Interesting from the beginning, when the 
action really gets started there is not a mo- 
ment when the excitement abates. Based 
on the always thrilling theme of stolen plans, 
with the "Pack," Eckstrom and the Lone 
Wolf all trying to get the plans, it brings 
in complications which keep the action 
jumping right along. The scenes in which 
the Lone Wolf gets the plans from the thief 
who has robbed Eckstrom are very well han- 
dled. And the scenes in which the Pack 
discovers Lucy and the Lone Wolf in the 
studio and she tries to trick them with the 
pack of cards in which the plans have been 
hidden, cannot fail to give patrons a thrill. 

The audience always likes the unexpected, 
and the identity of the leading woman is 
well hidden so that the audience will have a 
surprise awaiting them when it is discov- 
ered Lucy is a member of the Secret Service 
and not of the Pack. 

The only part of the picture which is not 
well handled is the chase in the aeroplane, 
part of this is apparently work in the studio 
and it rather spoils the thrills. 

Jack Holt makes a very interesting gen- 
tleman crook, and his quick actions, done in 
his usual calm manner, will please the people. 
Dorothy Dalton is at her best in crook pic- 
tures. Here she cleverly emphasizes the 
love element and her growing admiration for 
the Lone Wolf, all the while she is keeping 
you interested in her movements of spying 
on the Lone Wolf. The supporting cast all 
do their part to help along the picture which 
is just the sort which is going to please the 
audience. 

Cast 

Lucy Shannon Dorothy Dalton 

Michael Lanyard Jack Holt 

William Burroughs Wilton Lackaye 

Bnnnon Tyrone Power 

(lure Henshuw Charlotte Walker 

Annette Dupre Lucy Fox 

Popinot Edouard Durant 

Solon Robert T. Haines 

Werthelmer Gustave Von SeylTertitz 

Eckstrom Alphonse Ethier 

I . S. Ambassador William Tooker 

Count de Morbihnn Paul McAllister 

Story by Louis Joseph Vance. 
Written for screen and directed by 
S. E. V. Taylor. 
Length, 6 reels. 




FOR PROPER PRESENTATIONS 



Story 

Plans for an apparatus to bring down 
aeroplanes are hidden In a pack of cards 
and stolen. "The Pack," a gang of crooks, 
learns Eckstrom has the plans and goes after 
them. Lucy Shannon, a member of the Pack, 
meets Michael Lanyard, whom she suspects 
is the Lone Wolf, the noted crook. The Lone 
Wolf, much attracted to Lucy, goes to the 
American Ambassador and says he will de- 
liver the plans to him If he will furnish a 
fast aeroplane and promise the Lone Wolf 
shall have a chance to live unmolested In 
America. When the man from the Pack gets 
the plans from Eckstrom the Lone Wolf 
knocks him senseless and gets the plans. 
He takes them from the pack of cards and 
conceals them In a cigarette. Lucy leaves 
a warning In the Lone Wolf's room that the 
Pack are after him. He and she try to es- 
cape together. Eluding the Pack, they hide 
in a friend's studio. When the Pack finds 
them, to make them believe she has not 
double-crossed them, Lucy turns a revolver 
on the Wolf and makes him lay the cards 
on the table. The Pack takes them and runs 
but Eckstrom demands the cigarette and 
leaves in an aeroplane. The Wolf and Lucy 
overtake him and after a fight In the air 
Ket the plans and deliver them safely. Then 
the Wolf finds out Lucy Is a member of the 
Secret Servlee. 



"Bluff" 



Agnes Ayres and Antonio Moreno Featured 
in Entertaining Sam Wood Production 
for Paramount 
Reviewed by C. S. Sewell 

The impression widely prevalent in many 
sections of the country that success in New 
York is largely the result of the clever use 
of bluffing, is the idea behind "Bluff." Sam 
Wood's latest production for Paramount, 
which is an entertaining romantic melodrama 
with comedy touches, featuring Agnes Ayres 
and Antonio Moreno. 

The story concerns a young girl from a 
small town who is unable to even get the 
leading modistes to look at her designs for 
gowns until she poses as a celebrated actress 
who has mysteriously disappeared, hires an 
expensive suite and dresses gorgeously, then, 
they all flock to her. The melodramatic 
angle is introduced by having the police use 
this deception in an attempt to cause her 
injured brother to release the political boss 
from all liability for the injury. But "bluff" 
used by her sweetheart again saves the situa- 
tion. 

The title of the picture offers good oppor- 
tunities for tie-ups and other forms of ex- 
ploitation, while Sam Wood's past successes 
and the popularity of the players should 
prove good audience attractors. 

All of the players are well cast and give 
capable performances, with by far the great- 
er part of the picture resting on the shoulders 
of Agnes Ayres, who wears some stunning 
gowns. The settings and production details 
are high-class. 

There are no big dramatic moments and 
the story fails to carry strong conviction due 
to some of the situations being overdrawn. 
It therefore cannot be taken too seriously. 
At the same time, there are a number of 
humorous touches and an exceedingly speedy 
romance, the theme will probably strike a 
popular chord with the average patron and 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



225 



the picture should prove a satisfactory at- 
traction in the majority of theatres. 

Cast 

Betty Hnllnwell Agnes Ayres 

Robert Fitzmnurice Antonio Moreno 

Norton Conroy E. H. Calvert 

BInkely Clarence Barton 

Kit .'hell Fred Bntler 

Dr. Curtlss Jack Gardner 

Fifine Pauline Paquette 

Jack Hollowell Roscoe Karns 

Story by Rita Weiman and Josephine 
Quirk. 

Scenario by Willis Goldberk. 
Directed by Sam Wood. 
Length, 5,442 feet. 

Story 

Betty, a dress designer, is unable to make 
any headway in New York, and her lot is 
made harder as her brother Jack is injured 
by an auto belonging to Kitchell, a political 
boss who tries to intimidate him into a small 
settlement for his injuries. Betty, learning of 
the disappearance of a London designer who 
resembles her, scrapes together some money, 
poses as the other woman, Nina, and hires a 
fashionable suite in a leading hotel. All of 
the modistes flock to her and she signs a 
contract with one of them, Conroy. BlakeJy 
a detective arrests her for posing as the 
other woman . Robert Fitzmaurice, a clever 
lawyer who has fallen in love with Betty, 
shows the value of bluff by not only causing 
Kitchell to free her but to make a settle- 
ment with her brother for a large amount, 
threatening to expose the story of how he 
has hounded her. Robert and Betty, discover, 
however that their love for each other is no 
bluff. 



'Girl of the Limberlost" 



F. B. O .Picturization of Famous Novel 
Rich in Sentimental Interest 
Reviewed by Sumner Smith 

One of the most popular American novels 
of the distinctly sentimental sort ever writ- 
ten has been made into one of the best pic- 
tures on the F. B. O. schedule. This is "A 
Girl of the Limberlost,'' by Gene Stratton- 
Porter, which, originally published years 
ago, has had a sale, mostly among women, 
exceeding 1,500,000 copies and still is in 
steady demand. "Freckles," a companion 
novel, with the same characters and locale, 
was similarly popular, so the picture will 
benefit from the prestige, accumulated 
through the years, of two unusually suc- 
cessful novels. 

With this prestige behind it, the picture 
at its inception was certain to have a market 
value. Now, after much thought has been 
lavished on it in highly expert editing, it 
emerges from the chrysalis as triumphantly 
as one of the Indiana moths that flutter 
through the story, and it looks like an ex- 
ceptionally good box-office bet. 

The picture was first shown reviewers 
while in an incomplete state. Seen a sec- 
ond time, the value of the film editor's work 
becomes apparent. 

"A Girl of the Limberlost" is the story 
of a girl who is a lover of nature, of the 
reformation of her brutal mother and of a 
sentimental boy who thinks he loves an- 
other girl. For true dramatic values, the 
first three reels of the six could hardly be 
overestimated. 'Emily Fitzroy, playing the 
mother who failed to save her husband from 



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quicksands because of approaching mother- 
hood, and who hates her daughter as the 
then unborn obstacle to the rescue, provides 
one of her finest characterizations. This 
sombre, brooding woman dominates the first 
half of the picture, partly through the dra- 
matic force of the story and largely through 
her own expertness. 

With the reformation of the mother a 
really new plot begins to unfold, and Gloria 
Grey, in the role of Elnora Comstock, the 
daughter, takes the center of the stage. She 
makes a very charming heroine, her work 
being delightfully natural and simple, lack- 
ing the superficial gestures and facial ex- 
pressions that another actress might have 
resorted to. Raymond McKee gives a good 
characterization of the boy in love, and 
Cullen Landis and Gertrude Olmsted are 
satisfactory in minor roles. 

"A Girl of the Limberlost" has one of the 
best openings we have seen. The various 
elements of the plot are knit together ex- 
pertly within a remarkably short footage, so 
that the story quickly gets under way. Ex- 
cept in about two places, it continues smooth- 
ly. One of these is a serious fault. A sub- 
title showing a letter is the only indication 
that the boy is seriously ill. As he has just 
been showed in the best of health, the dis- 
closure jolts the imagination. 

While the picture is distinctly romantic, 
there are a few comedy touches in it. The 
best of these, one of the best seen in a long 
time, concern a group of hogs that have 
partaken too liberally of grape skins, and 
they are enormously funny. This bit has 
been well handled and should not offend. 
Cast 

Elnora Comstock Gloria Grey 

Kate Comstock, her mother ... Emily Fitzroy 

Philip Ammon Raymond McKee 

Hart Henderson < 'alien Landis 

Edith Carr Gertrude Olmsted 

Wesley Slnton Alfred Alien 

Margaret Slnton Virginia Boardman 

Story and scenario by Gene Stratton-Porter« 
Directed by James Leo Meehan. 
Length, 6 reels. 
Story 

Elnora Comstock is a child of hate be- 
cause approaching motherhood had robbed 
Kate Comstock, her mother, of her strength 
when she might have saved her husband 
from the quicksands in Limberlost swamp. 
The mother's attitude toward the girl turns 
to love when she learns that her husband 
had been untrue to her, and that his horrible 
death was in the nature of a just punish- 
ment for his sin. At school Elnora meets 
Philip Ammon, who Is engaged to Edith Carr. 
Edith resents Philip's interest in Elnora and 
jilts him. He quickly discovers that hie loves 
Elnora. Edith later tries to reclaim his af- 
fections and Elnora disappears to let him 
choose between them. She returns when 
Philip is taken critically ill and by her pres- 
ence wins him back to health, convinced that 
it is she he loves. Edith finds solace in the 
arms of Hart Henderson, a faithful, long- 
time lover. 

"Untamed Youth" 



MUSICIANS SHOULD FOLLOW 



yAematic Music 



F. B. O. Offers Entertaining Picture with 
Ralph Lewis, Lloyd Hughes and 
Derelys Perdue 

Reviewed by C. S. Sewell 

In "Untamed Youth," F. B. O. is offering 
a picture with a theme that is out of the 
ordinary and holds the interest well. The 
story deals with a small town youth who is 
studying for the ministry and a gypsy girl 
who does not believe in Christianity. The 
struggle for love against these odds is 
shown, and there are a number of dramatic 
moments brought about by their conflict. 
Particularly effective is the sequence where 
the girl saves the life of the hero's little 




Cue ^SAeer^ 



FOR PROPER PRESENTATIONS 



brother who is ill, while the townspeople 
are yelling that she has killed him. 

The production is melodramatic in tone, 
and religion plays an important part in the 
theme. While the fact that the girl is an 
unbeliever and the hero put his faith above 
all else, adds to the dramatic values, there 
are certain subtitles in which she shows hos- 
tility to his beliefs, and one scene where she 
(Continued on page 227) 



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The Pep of The Program 

News and reviews of Shofct subjects and serials 



"The Junior Partner" 

(Educational — Comedy — Two Reels) 

"The Junior Partner," an Educational com- 
edy with John Fox, Jr., Jack McHugh and 
others, scores as juvenile material. The early 
action is around a scene in a country store 
and includes such well known methods of 
evoking laughs as mixing castor oil with 
soda. The action then turns slapstick, with 
a cat upsetting packages of cereal, folding 
stairs and elevators. A bold, bad bandit is 
introduced at the end and his capture effected 
by the boy. There is nothing very differ- 
ent from the usual run of these comedies, 
but the picture has been well directed and 
the players inject plenty of pep into the 
fun-ma!<ing. — S. S. 



"Taxi, Taxi" 

(Universal — Comedy — Two Reels) 

Harry McCoy, who has been co-starred 
with Jack Earle, the giant, in a number of 
comedies, is starred alone in this two-reeler 
produced by Century Comedy Co., although 
he works with a pal. The two boys hate 
work, but necessity finally drives them to 
take jobs as taxi drivers, and they find they 
are competitors of a big bully whose enmity 
they have previously incurred. The boys 
combine to harass him and meet with a 
great measure of success. Considerable 
cleverness and ingenuity have been shown 
in devising the situations with the taxis by 
which the boys block the bully and get his 
customers away from him, and in addition 
to providing a number of laughs, this has 
the added element of novelty. It is well up 
to the standard of the usual Century comedy 
and should provide good entertainment for 
the majority of program houses. — C. S. S. 



"The Bonehead" 

(Educational — Comedy — Two Reels) 

The Tuxedo Comedy, "The Bonehead," re- 
leased by Educational and presenting 
"Poodles" Hanneford, manages to be satis- 
factorily funny though it follows conventional 
lines. The morning train brings a troupe of 
ham actors to the town, including a crooked 
theatrical manager, and the fun revolves 
around, first, the bonehead's interference 
with the show they put on, and second, 
with a chase after the manager, who has 
stolen money from the opera house owner. 
This chase is well staged and offers several 
real thrills when automobiles narrowly es- 
cape collision with trains. The acting is, 
of course, broad burlesque, and it is gen- 
erally effective. — S. S. 



"Pathe Review No. 19" 

(Pathe — Magazine — One Reel) 

Probably the most interesting item in this 
issue from the standpoint of the average 
patron is the section showing how gold 
leaf is made and beaten out to an almost 
unbelievable thinness until it is transparent. 
Other sections show how styles in women's 
hats were inspired by the love bird of Java, 
a color section showing Granada in Spam, 
and another portion picturing the strange 
methods of Mexican farmers. — C. S. S. 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Alice's Wild West Show (Winkler) 
Alice's Day at Sea (Winkler) 
Bonehead, The (Educational) 
Bulltosser, The (Universal) 
Junior Partner (Educational) 
Near Dublin (Pathe) 
North of 50-50 (Pathe) 
Pathe Review No. 19 (Pathe) 
Pigskin Hero, A (Universal) 
When Winter Comes (Pathe) 
Taxi, Taxi (Universal) 



"The Pigskin Hero" 

(Universal — Comedy — One Reel) 

This Universal reissued single reel comedy 
stars one of the most popular teams of a 
few seasons past, Eddie Lyons and Lee 
Moran. The story revolves around a foot- 
ball game in which Eddie, a greenhorn, is 
mistaken for Lee, who is an expert. Naturally 
he creates all sorts of confusion, but some- 
how by accident is instrumental in helping 
to win the game. It is an amusing offering 
containing a good quota of laughs. — C. S. S. 



"When Winter Comes" 

(Pathe— Cartoon— One Reel) 

The current issue of the Aesop Fable 
cartoons shows the various animals, dogs, 
cats, pigs and hippos engaged in different 
winter sports such as snowshoeing, sledding, 
and ice-skating. Paul Terry's usual in- 
genuity and ability to inject humor into the 
various situations is again evident, and there 
is much that will entertain the average audi- 
ence. — C. S. S. 



COMING 
A "HISTORIET" 

TEAPOT DOME 

(Not a Review) 
Illustrated, Animated and "Cartoonized" 
with "Multi-Color" Titles 
Something: new and unusual. 

TO FOLLOW: 

"Famous Sayings of Famous Americans" 
"Witty Sayings of Witty Frenchmen" 
"Witty Naughty Thoughts" 
"Love Affairs of Famous Men" (A Series) 
ALL Our "Historiets" Are 
Illustrated, Animated and "Cartoonized" 

AND BESIDES 

Have "Multi-Color" Titles and Scenes 
"See It in Colors" 

REEL-COLORS, Inc. 

LABORATORIES, LYNDHURST 
(Art Studios and Offices) 

85 RIVERSIDE DRIVE 
NEW YORK 

Phone Endicott 7784-7364 



"Near Dublin" 

(Pathe — Comedy — Two Reels) 

The newest of the series of Hal Roach 
two-reel comedies starring Stan Laurel K 
like the majority of the preceding issues, a 
burlesque. This time, it is the type of 
romantic Irish plays such as Chauncey Olcott 
appears in so successfully on the speaking 
stage, that it travesties. Stan is cast as a 
postman, the rival of the village noble for 
the hand of a fair colleen. The nobleman 
is a hard-hearted villain. He has Stan jailed 
but he escapes and in a fight Stan makes it 
appear that the nobleman has killed him. 
Stan keeps under cover, but during the 
murder trial a fire breaks out and Stan ap- 
pears. Everyone believes he is a ghost and 
they scamper away in confusion. The noble- 
man learns the truth and an amusing chase 
begins. The way the characters skip lightly 
away is sure to get a laugh. There is con- 
siderable slap-stick and everyone indulges in 
brick throwing all through the picture. 
While it lacks some of the snap of the 
previous Laurel comedies, it is nevertheless 
amusing and the "plot" and atmosphere are 
quite out of the ordinary. It should prove an 
amusing and entertaining offering with the 
majority of patrons. — C. S. S. 



"The Bulltosser" 

(Universal — Western — Two Reels) 

Pete Morrison is the star of this Universal 
two-reel Western and appears in the role 
of a cowboy who is always telling highly 
colored and altogether improbable stories 
of his exploits, but when called upon to 
prove his ability falls down hard. The char- 
acter he portrays is that of a "natural-born" 
prevaricator and he seems incapable of tell- 
ing the truth, even though he always gets 
caught. He incurs the displeasure of his 
sweetheart who treats him with contempt, 
but when she is attacked by a bandit and 
kidnapped, he rises to the occasion and 
makes good with her by rescuing her. He 
then starts to tell the truth, but she says 
she prefers his lies. The story interest is 
slight and not altogether consistent; how- 
ever, it is amusing and contains consider- 
able action. Will probably satisfy but is 
hardly up to the usual Pete Morrison stand- 
ard. — C. S. S. 



"North of 50-50" 

(Pathe — Comedy— One Reel) 

As intimated by the title which brings to 
mind the expression "North of 53" this Hal 
Roach Dippy-Do-Dad comedy introduces all 
of the familiar situations of the stirring 
melodramas of the far north with the 
familiar situations of the Mounted Police 
who starts out to "Get his man," who. 
in this instance is his sweetheart's black- 
sheep brother. She hides him but blood 
dripping from the attic reveals his presence. 
All the principal roles are very cleverly 
portrayed by monkeys and there are a couple 
of ducks that figure in the plot. It is an 
entertaining reel with a number of clever 
and amusing situations and is well up to the 
high standard of the preceding issues in this 
novel series. — C. S. S. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



227 



"Alice's Wild West Show" 

(Winkler— Novelty— One Reel) 

In this reel the first of a series produced 
by Walter Disney and distributed on the state 
right market by M. J. Winkler, clever use 
is made of photography and cartoon work 
in combination. There is considerable 
novelty in tire manner in which this is 
handled, the photographed characters and 
cartoon characters working together against 
a cartoon background, there are also a num- 
ber of scenes in which straight camera work 
is employed. A pretty and talented little 
tot, Alice, is the featured player, and she 
will make a hit with almost any audience. 
In this reel she gives a wild west show, in- 
troducing a lot of kid stunts and comedy. 
A tough gang cause the "actors" to go on 
strike and Alice saves the show by reciting 
some of her harrowing experiences out west. 
Here is where the cartoon work is utilized 
with Alice herself is chased by "cartoon" 
Indians, or proves a heroine in a fight with 
thugs, all of whom have been drawn by 
the cartoonist. This makes an interesting 
reel, with considerable pep, human interest 
and comedy, which should prove a pleasing 
novelty with the average patron and appeal 
especially to the children. — C. S. S. 



"Alice's Day at Sea" 

(Winkler— Novelty— One Reel) 

This, the second of the Alice series dis- 
tributed by M. J. Winkler, in which camera 
and cartoon work is cleverly used in com- 
bination, shows Alice having a wonderful 
dream after he has listened to a sailor's 
yarns. She is shown meeting with all sorts 
of adventures, finally landing at the bottom 
of the sea where she is attacked by a couple 
of octopuses which have been supplied by 
the cartoonist's pen. As in the first of the 
series this co-operation of camera and car- 
toon work is novel and effective and makes 
an interesting offering. — C. S. S. 



"Untamed Youth" 

(Continued from page 225) 

takes the cross away from her grandfather's 
grave, which many will not like and will con- 
sider as sacreligious. The scene where she 
drives the mother of the sick boy out of the 
room will also strike an unresponsive chord 
with a number of spectators, even though 
she saves the boy's life and explains that 
her action was necessary, as the mother was 
nearly crazed with grief and was harming 
the child instead 1 of helping him. 

The manner in which the heroine is con- 
verted by what is really in the nature of a 



miracle, while impressive and providing for 
thrilling scenes, is not altogether convincing 
and is melodramatic. 

The work of the cast is entirely satisfac- 
tory. Derelys Perdue is excellent as the 
gypsy, and Lloyd Hughes does good work 
as the hero. Ralph Lewis does fine work, 
but his role is a minor one, and the same 
is true of Emily Fitzroy. Joseph Dowling 
is congenially cast as a minister. 

This picture should prove a satisfactory 
program attraction, because of its dramatic 
and melodramatic situations and the force 
of the story, except with patrons who are 
not in sympathy with the manner in which 
the religious angle is handled. 

Cast 

Marcheta Derelys Perdue 

Robert Ardis Lloyd Hughes 

Joe Ardis Ralph Lewis 

Emily Ardis Emily Fitzroy 

Pietro Joseph Snirkard 

Rev, Loranger Joseph Dowling; 

Jim Larson Tom O'Brien 

Ralph Micky McBarr 

Based on play by G. Marion Burton. 
Adapted by Beehan and Stillson. 
Photographed by J. A. Dubray. 
Directed by Emile Chautard. 
Length, live reels. 
Story 

Robert Ardis, a small town youth. Is 
studying for the ministry. A gypsy girl, 
Marcheta, and her grandfather Pietro come 
to town. Marcheta's dancing displeases Rob- 
ert, so she starts to selling trinkets. Mar- 
cheta's beauty arouses the jealousy of the 
women, and when Robert's little brother Is 
ill and she gives him medicine, driving 
everyone out of the room, the townspeople 
believe she has killed the child, but he re- 
covers. Although Robert dislikes her be- 
cause she does not believe in God, he is fas- 
cinated nevertheless. When her father dies, 
he tries to help her, but she turns on him 
in scorn and he will not let his heart speak. 
A fierce storm wrecks a bridge on which 
Robert is crossing and he falls into the 
water. Marcheta prays to heaven for aid 
and a tree falls across the stream. She 
finally rescues Robert and tells him that 
she believes in God, removing the barrier to 
their happiness. 



"Wandering Husbands" 

Lila Lee and James Kirkwood Co-starred in 
Hodkinson's Clever and Entertaining 
Domestic Drama 
Reviewed by Beatrice Barrett 

Hodkinson's "Wandering Husbands" pre- 
sents a rather new angle of the domestic 
drama plot. It belongs to the type where 
the characters all seem to be real and fa- 
miliar persons, with the situations sometimes 



striking so near home as to seem bits of per- 
sonal history. 

Almost the entire action of the story is 
carried on by three persons, Lila Lee, James 
Kirkwood and Margaret Livingston, and they 
handle their roles so well that the interest 
is held from beginning to end. The picture 
teems with human interest and dramatic sit- 
uations, with here and there a good comedy 
note, as to make it a splendid audience 
picture. 

Lila Lee and James Kirkwood make the 
characters of Diana and George exceedingly 
natural and true to life. Lila is delightful to 
look at and there is a wistfulness to her por- 
trayal of the devoted young mother which 
will add many to her list of admirers. Kirk- 
wood as the philandering husband is also 
very good, while Margaret Livingston as the 
other woman does exceedingly well and gives 
us a new type of vamp, a vivacious, hoy- 
denish playfellow. The two children in the 
cast emphasize the human interest appeal. 

This makes no pretense of being a lavish 
production, but it is an artistic one with 
beautiful sets and exceptional photography 
adding much to the pleasing atmosphere of 
the picture. 

The story culminates in a suspense pro- 
ducing situation where the wife by taking 
the three out in a leaky boat forces the hus- 
band to choose between her and the other 
woman. With the boat sinking, the other 
woman clamoring to be saved and the wife 
standing calmly ready to drown should her 
husband choose the other woman, the climax 
is guaranteed to give many thrills. 

Cast 

George Moreland James Kirkwood 

Diana Moreland Lila Lee 

Marilyn Foster Margaret Livingston 

Percy Eugene Pallette 

Rosemary Moreland .... Muriel Frances Dana 

Jim Turner Savage 

Bates George Pearce 

Directed by William Beaudine. 

Story by C. Gardner Sullivan. 
Length, 6,300 feet. 
Story 

Diana Moreland, discovering her husband 
is spending his time with another woman, 
decides to get a divorce, but the thought of 
their child stops her. Moreland promises he 
will give up the other woman and tells her 
he is through. But she gets him back again, 
and the wife takes things Into her own 
hands. Diana goes to a roadhouse where 
her husband and the other woman are hav- 
ing dinner and becomes the merriest one In 
the party. She invites the other woman 
home to spend a week end with them. She 
takes them out in a motor boat, knowing It 
is unsafe. The boat starts to sink and 
Moreland is faced with the problem of which 
woman he will save. He swims ashore with 
his wife. Another boat picks up the other 
woman, who goes out of his life completely. 




Paramount presents Cecil B. DeMille's production "Triumph" with Leatrice Joy and Rod La Rocque. Screen play by Jeanie 
Macpherson, founded on the Saturday Evening Post story by May Edginton. 



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EDUCATIONAL FILMS CORP. 

Neck and Neck Mermaid comedy Tan. 

Oh, Girls/ Sid Smith Jan. 

The Butterfly — Tolhurst series Jan. 

Aggravating Papa Jimmy Adams Feb. 

The Broncho Express Clyde Cook Feb. 

About Face Juvenile comedy , Feb. 

Here And There Sid Smith Feb. 

A Movie Pioneer Hodge Podge Feb. 

Lonesome Lloyd Hamilton Feb. 

Old Friends "Sing Them Again" Feb. 

Busy Buddies Christie comedy Feb. 

Plastigrams Stereoscopic Feb. 

Wide Open Mermaid comedy Feb. 

Jumping Jacks Hodge-Podge Mar. 

Getting Gertie's Goat Dorothy Devore Mar. 

Cave Inn Sid Smith Mar. 

The Ant Lion Secrets of Life .Mar. 

Long Ago "Sing Them Again" Mar. 

The New Sheriff , Tuxedo comedy .Mar. 

Under Orders Clyde Cook Mar. 

Midnight Blues Lige Conley Mar. 

Family Life Jack White prod Mar. 

Bargain Day Sid Smith Mar. 

Barnum Jr Juvenile comedy Mar. 

The Fly Scientific April 

Killing Rime Lloyd Hamilton April 

Dusty Dollars Cameo comedy April 

Dandy Lions Neal Burns April 

Safe and Sane Jimmie Adams April 

There He Goes Mermaid comedy April 

Heart Throbs "Sing Them Again" April 

Realm of Sport Hodge-Podge April 

Fold Up Cameo comedy April 

Going East Lloyd Hamilton April 

The Fun Shop Humor reel April 

The Trader Keeps Moving Bruce scenic April 

The Lady -Bird Instructive April 

Cornfed Bobby Vernon May 

Out Bound Cliff Bowes May 

The Fun Shop Humor Reel May 

Powder Marks Cliff Bowes May 

Lost Chords "Sing Them Again" May 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY 

The Ten Commandments Cecil B. DeMille prod Jan. 

Heritage of the Desert Daniels-Torrence Feb. 

Flaming Barriers Logan-Moreno Feb. 

Pied Piper Malone Thomas Meighan Feb. 

The Stranger Compson-Dix Feb. 



26 2,000 

26 1,000 

26 1,000 

2 2,000 



2.0UO 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1.0U0 
2,000 
1.000 
2,000 
1,000 
2.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2.000 
.2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 

5 1,000 

5 2,000 

5 1,000 

12 2,000 

12 2,000 

19 2,000 

19 2,000 



1,000 
1,000 
2.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



5 12,000 



The Next Corner Tearle-Chaney-Mackai] 



6,917 
5.821 
7,264 
6,660 

Feb. 23 7.081 

Shadows of Paris Pola Negri Mar. 1 6.540 

Icebound Dix-Wilson Mar. 15 6,471 

A Society Scandal Gloria Swanson Mar. 22 6.433 

The Fighting Coward James Cruze prod Mar. 29 6,501 

The Dawn of a Tomorrow Jacqueline Logan April 5 6,084 

Singer Jim McKee W. S. Hart April 12 7.008 

The Breaking Point Star cast April 19 6.064 

The Confidence Man Thomas Meighan April 26 6,500 

The Moral Sinner Dorothy Dalton April 26 5,439 

Triumph C. B. DeMille prod May 3 8.292 

FILM BOOKING OFFICE OF AMERICA 

After the Ball T. O. D. C. prod Jan. 5 6,500 

Babes in the Hollywood "Fighting Blood" Jan. 12 2,000 

Beauty and the Feast "Fighting Blood" Jan. 12 2,000 

The Switching Hour "Fighting Blood" Jan. 12 2.000 

Phantom Justice .Feature cast Jan. 26 6.238 

Alimony Featured cast Feb. 1 6917 

Week-End Husbands Alma Rubens Feb. 9 6,700 

White Sin Madge Bellamy Feb. 23 6,237 

The Telephone Girt (series) Alberta Vaughn Feb. 23 

Damaged Hearts Featured cast Mar. 1 6.154 

When Kntsjhthood Was tn Tower. .. "Telephone Girl" Mar. 8 2.000 

North of Nevada Fred Thompson Mar. 15 5.000 

Galloping Gallagher Fred Thompson Mar. 29 4,700 



Money to Burns "Telephone Girl" Mar. 29 2,001 

Sherlocks Home "Telephone Girl" Mar. 29 2,000 

Yankee Madness Larkin-Dove April 5 4,680 

His Forgotten Wife Bellamy-Baxter April 12 6,500 

The Silent Stranger Fred Thomson April 19 5,000 

The Beloved Vagabond Carlyle Blackwell April 26 6,217 

William Tells "Terephone Girl" May 3 2,000 

FIRST NATIONAL 

Boy of Mine Ben Alexander Dec. 

The Wanters Marie Prevost Dec. 

Thundergate Owen Moore Dec 

Her Temporary Husband Sydney Chaplin Dec. 

The Dangerous Maid Constance Talmadge Dec 

lealous Husbands Maurice Tourneur prod. ...Dec 

Black Oxen Corinne Griffith Jan. 

The Song of Love Norma Talmadg* Jan. 

The Love Master "Strongheart" Jan. 

Painted People Colleen Moore Feb. 

When A Man's A Man John Bowers Feb. 

Flowing Gold Nilsson-Sills Mar. 

Lilies of the Field Corinne Griffith Mar. 

The Galloping Fish Thos. H. Ince prod Mar. 

Secrets Norma Talmadge April 

The Enchanted Cottage Richard Barthelmess April 

Cytherea Rich-Stone May 



8 7,600 

8 6,871 

15 6,M6 

22 6J2I 

22 7j* 

29 6.100 

19 7J» 

19 «.00» 

19 639 

» 5,700 

16 6&0 

1 8,005 

22 8,510 

22 6,000 

5 8,345 

19 7,120 

3 7,400 



FOX FILM CORP. 



2,008 
5,8* 
2.908 

5,434 
1.088 

, 5.444 
. 4.823 
. 6,008 
. 2,000 
. 5,874 
. 2,000 
. 6,112 
. 5.800 
. 1,000 
. 

. 2,000 
. 1.000 
. .5,145 
.2,000 
.1,000 
4,562 
2,000 
1.000 



29 6 316 

5 2,008 

12 5,041 

12 1,000 

5 5.812 

3 6,400 

3 1,000 



Arabia's Last Alarm Imperial comedy Jan. 12.. 

Gentle Julia Bessie Love Jan. 19., 

Spring Fever Harry Sweet Jan. It.. 

Hoodman Blind David Butler Jan. 24.. 

The Canadian Alps Instructive Jan. 26.. 

Just Off Broadway John Gilbert Feb. 2. 

Not A Drum Was Heard Charles "Buck" Jones Feb. t. 

The Net Barbara Castleton Feb. 9. 

Highly Recommended Al St. John Feb. 9. 

Shadow of the East Featured cast Feb. 16. 

School Pals Imperial comedy Feb. 16. 

Ladies to Board Tom Mix Feb. 23. 

The Blizzard Featured cast Mar. 1. 

Frogland Special Mar. 1. 

Love Letters Shirley Mason Mar. 8. 

The Weakling Sunshine comedy Mar. 8. 

A Sculptor's Paradise Instructive Mar. 8. 

The Wolf Man John Gilbert Mar. 15. 

Be Yourself Al St. John Mar. 15.. 

Rivers of Song Instructive ...Mar. IS.. 

The Vagabond Trail Charles Jones Mar. 22. 

The Cowboys Imperial comedy Mar. 22. 

Feathered Fishermen Instructive Mar. 22. 

The Arizona Express Charles Jones Mar. 

The Plunderer Frank Mayo April 

On the Job Chimpanzees April 

A Man's Mate John Gilbert April 

A New England Farm Instructive April 

The Circus Cowboy Charles Jones May 

Slippery Decks Card sharps exposed May 

GOLDWYN 

Through the Dark Colleen Moore Jan. 19 FJ8» 

Yolanda Marion Davies Mar. 1 12.000 

Wild Oranges King Vidor prod. Mar. 15 7.000 

Nellie, the Beautiful Cloak Model... Star cast April 5 7,008 

Three Weeks Pringle-Nagle April 12 7,540 

Recoil Blythe-Hamilton 

Greed Von Stroheim prod 

True As Steel Rupert Hughes prod 

Janice Meredith Marion Davies 

Second Youth Star cast 

The Rejected Woman Nagel-Rubens 

Second Youth Star cast April 19 6,169 

The Rejected Woman Rubens-Nagel May 3 7,761 

HODKINSON 

Grit Glenn Hunter Jan. 12 5.800 

Love's Whirlpool Kirkwood-Lee Mar. 22 6.028 

The Hoosier Schoolmaster Henry Hull Mar. 29 5,558 

His Darker Self Lloyd Hamilton April 5 5,000 

Try and Get It Bryant Washburn April 12 5.60? 

Which Shall It Be? Star cast April 19 5,000 

The Night Hawk Harry Carey 

Try and Get It Bryant Washburn 

Wandering Husbands Kirkwood-Lee 

Miami Betty Compson 

METRO 

Scaramouche Rex Ingram prod Oct. 13 9,608 

A Wife's Romance Clara K. Young Nov. 3 6.088 

Shooting of Dan McGrew Barbara LaMarr 

Our Hospitality Buster Keaton Nov. 24 6,288 

Fashion Row Mae Murray Dec. 8 7,388 

Half a-Dollar-Bin Anna Q. Nilsson Dec. 15 5,788 

The Heart Bandit Viola Dana Tan. 19 4.988 

The Fool's Awakening Harrison Ford Feb. 16 5,763 

The Man Life Passed By Novak-Marmont Mar. 1 6,200 

Thy Name Is Woman Mong-La Marr Mar. 1 9,087 

The Uninvited Guest Jean Tolley Mar. 8 6,141 

Happiness Laurette Taylor Mar. 8 7,788 

Women Who Give Reginald Barker prod Mar. 22 7.500 

A Boy of Flanders Jackie Coogan April 5 7,018 

The Shooting of Dan McGrew Star cast April 12 6.318 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



229 



(Continued from preceding page) 

PATHE 



Ravtnr 



Roview 



Footage 

2,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Big Business "Our Gang" Feb. 9. 

Powder and Smoke Charles Chase Feb. 9. 

Animal Athlete* "Sportlight" Feb. 9. 

Good Old Days Terry cartoon Feb. 9., 

The Man Pays "Dippy-doo-dad" Feb. 16 1,000 

A Rural Romance Terry cartoon Feb. 16 1,000 

Among the Missing Will Nigh Miniature Feb. 16 2,000 

Postage Due Stan Laurel Feb. 16 2,000 

Tho Man Who Smiled "Frontier" series Feb. 16 2,000 

Peter Stuyvesant "Chronicles of America" ... Feb. 23 3,000 

Half Back of Notre Dame Sennett comedy Feb. 23 2,000 

Olympic Mermaids "Sportlight" Feb. 23 1,000 

Political Pull "Spat Family" Feb. 23 2,000 

Smile Please Harry Langdon Mar. 1 2,000 

White Man Who Turned Indian. ... "Frontier" series Mar. 1 2,000 

Hard Knocks Charles Chase Mar. 1 1,000 

The Cake Eater Will Rogers Mar. 1 2.000 

Lore's Detour Charles Chase Mar. S 2,000 

The National Rash "Sportlight" Mar. S 1,000 

The All Star Cast Terry cartoon Mar. 8 1,000 

The Buccaneers "Our Gang" Mar. 8 2,000 

Herman the Freat Mouse Terry cartoon Mar. 8 1,000 

Love's Reward "Dippy Doo Dads" Mar. 15 1,000 

The Mandan's Oath Frontier series Mar. 15 2,000 

Zeb Versus Paprika Stan Laurel Mar. 15 2,000 

Why Mice Leave Home Terry cartoon Mar. 15 1,000 

Wolfe and Montcalm Chronicles of America Mar. 22 3,000 

Scarem Much Sennett comedy Mar. 22 2,000 

Fields of Glory "Sportlight" Mar. 22 1,000 

Hunters Bold "Spat Family" Mar. 22 2,000 

From Rags to Riches & Back Again. Terry cartoon Mar. 23 1,000 

Don't Forget Charles Chase Mar. 22 1,000 

King^ of Wild Horses Rex (horse) Mar. 29 5,000 

Big Moments from Little Pictures. . Will Rogers Mar. 29 2,000 

Fraidy Cat Charles Chase Mar. 29 1,000 

Shanghaied Lovers Harry Langdon Mar. 29 2,000 

The Champion Terry cartoon Mar. 29 1,000 

Dirty Little Half Breed Frontier series Mar. 29 2,000 

Seem' Things "Our Gang" April 5 2,000 

Birds of Passage Bird Novelty April 5 3,000 

Running Wild Terry cartoon April 5 1,000 

Friend Husband Snub Pollard April 5 1,000 

The Swift and Strong "Sportlight" April 5 1,000 

Girl-Shy Harold Lloyd April 12 7,457 

Our Little Nell "Dippy-doo-dad" April 12 1,000 

Medicine Hat Frontier series April'12 2,000 

Brothers Under the Chin Stan Laurel April 12 2,000 

Gateway of the West 8th Chronicle April 19 3,000 

The Hollywood Kid Sennett comedy April 19 2,000 

Hit the High Spots ''Spat Family" April 19 2,000 

One At a Time Earl Mohan April 19 1,000 

If Noah Lived Today Terry cartoon April 19 1,000 

A Trip to the Pole Terry cartoon April 26 1,000 

Sun and Snow "Sportlight" April 26 1,000 

Get Busy Snub Pollard April 26 1,000 

Highbrow Stuff Will Rogers April 26 2,000 

Flickering Youth Sennett comedy April 26 2,000 

Commencement Day "Our Gang" May 3 2.000 

An Ideal Farm Terry cartoon May 3 1,000 

Homeless Pups Terry cartoon May 3 1,000 

Sporting Speed "Sportlight" May 3 1,000 

Publicity Pays Charles Chase May 3 1,000 

PLAYGOERS PICTURES 

Counterfeit Love Featured cast June 30 6,000 

Tipped Off Featured cast Nov. 3 4,284 

PREFERRED PICTURES 

April Showers Colleen Moore Nov. 17 

The Virginian Kenneth Harlan Nov. 24 

Maytime Ethel Shannon Dec. 8 

Poisoned Paradise Lenneth Harlan Mar. 8 



6,?. 
8,0 
7.S 
6.800 



SELZNICK 

The Common Law Corrine Griffith Nov. 10 7,500 

Daughters of Today Patsy Ruth Miller Mar. 15 7,000 

Woman to Woman Betty Compson April 26 6,804 

TRUART FILM CORP. 

The Unknown Purple Henry B. Walthall Dec. 8 6.950 

Drums of Jeopardy Elaine Hamraerstein Man 15 6,529 

On Time Richard Talmadge Mar. 15 6,630 



UNITED ARTISTS 

Rosita Mary Pickford Sept. 15. 

A Woman of Paris Chas. Chaplin prod Oct. 13. 



8,800 
8,000 



UNIVERSAL 

Girls Will Be Girls "Leather Pushers" Feb. 

Miscarried Plans Bob Reeves Feb. 

The Mandarin Neely Edwards ,. Feb. 

The Breathless Moment William Desmond Feb. 

Keep Going Century comedy Feb. 

Hata Off Pete Morrison Feb. 

Down in Jungle Town ."Joe Martin" Feb. 

The Fast Express Wm. Duncan Serial Feb. 

Jack O' Clubs Herbert Rawlinson Feb. 

Lone Larry Eileen Sedgwick Feb. 

You're Next Century comedy Feb. 

The Jail Bird Neely Edwards Feb. 

Memorial to Woodrow Wilson Special Feb. 

Ride For Your Life Hoot Gibson Mar. 

A Society Sensation Valentino (reissue) Mar. 

The Very Bad Man Neely Edwards Mar. 

Peg Cy the Mounted Baby Peggy Mar. 

The Law Forbids Baby Peggy Mar. 

Swing Bad, the Sailor "Leather Pushers" Mar. 

Sons In Law Centurv comedy Mar. 

Should Poker Players Marry? Neely Edwards Mar. 



2. 
2. 
2. 
9. 
9. 
9. 
9. 

9 

16 4,717 

16 2,000 

16 2,000 



2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
5,556 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 



16. 
16. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1.. 

8 6,263 

8 2,000 

8 2,000 

8 1,000 



1,000 
1.000 

S.310 
2.00(1 
1,000 
2.000 



Footage 

IS 6^00 

IS 2.000 

IS 2,000 

15 1,000 

IS 4,389 

22 4,742 

22 2,000 

22 1,000 

29 4,531 

29 1,000 

29 2,000 

S 4,561 

5 2,000 

5 1,000 



Fool'a Highway Virginia Valli Mar. 

Big Boy Blue "Leather Puahers" Mar. 

The Oriental Game "Pal"-Century Mar. 

Keep Healthy Slim Summerville Mar. 

Phantom Horseman Jack Hoxie Mar. 

Stolen Secrets Herbert Rawlinson Mar. 

The Young Tenderfoot Buddy Messinger Mar. 

Nobody to Love Neely Edwards Mar. 

The Night Message Gladys Hulette Mar. 

Ship Ahoy Bobby Dunn Mar. 

That's Rich ', Arthur Trimble Mar. 

The Galloping Ace Jack Hoxie April 

Hit Him Hard Jack Earle April 

Marry When Young Neely Edwards April 

Checking Out "Pal the dog April 

Spring of 1964 Neely Edwards April 

Excitement Laura LaPlante April 

The Storm Daughter Priscilla Dean April 

The Racing Kid Buddy Messinger April 

Forty Horse Hawkins Hoot Gibson April 

One Wet Night Neely Edwards April 

Pretty Plungers Follies Girls April 

Riders Up Creighton Hale May 

Politics u Slim and Bobby May 

Green Grocers Slim and Bobby May 

A Lofty Marriage Jack Earle May 

VITAGRAPH 

The Leavenworth Case W. Bennett prod Nov. 24 5,400 

The Man From Brodney's Special cast Dec. 8 7,100 

The Ninety and Nine David Smith prod Dec. 23 6,800 

Modern Banking Urban Classic Dec. 22 1,000 

Newsprint Paper Urban Classic Dec. 22 1,000 



2,000 
1,000 
4,913 
5,303 
2,000 
5,149 
1,000 
2,000 
4,904 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 



Horseshoes Larry Semon Dec. 22 2,000 



The Last Stand of Red Man Urban classic Dec. 29. 

Let Not Man Put Asunder Feature cast Jan. 26. , 

My Man Patsy Ruth Miller Feb. 23. 

Virtuous Liars David Powell April 19. 



1,000 
8,000 
. 6.800 
5,650 



Between Friends Blackton prod April 26 6,900 

WARNER BROTHERS 

Lucretia Lombard Irene Rich Dec. 22 7,500 

The Marriage Circle Ernest Lubitsch prod Feb. 16 8,500 

Conductor 1492 Johnny Hines Feb. 23 6,500 

Daddies Belasco play Feb. 23 6,800 

George Washington, Jr Wesley Barry Mar. 22 6,700 

Beau Brummel John Barrymore April 12 10,000 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Rrrlew 



Footage 



APPROVED PICTURES CORP. 



Rough Ridin' Buddy Roosevelt April 26 4,670 

GRAND-ASCHER DISTRIBUTING CORP. 

Lucky Rube Sid Smith Not. 10 2,000 

Mark It Paid Joe Rock Nor. 10 2,000 

The Way Men Love Elliot Dexter Nov. 17 7,541 



A Dark Knight Joe Rock Dec. 1. 

Hollywood Bound Sid Smith Dec. 1. 

Taxi, Please 1 Monty Banks Dec. 1. 

The Satin Girl Mabel Forrest Dec. 8. 

Other Men's Daughters Ben Wilson prod. Jan. 19. 

CHARLES C. BURR 

The Average Woman All star cast Feb. 2. 

Restless Wives Doris Kenyon Feb. 16. 

Three O'CTock in the Morning Constance Binney Feb. 23. 



2.000 
2,000 
2,000 
5,591 
$<XH 



6.000 
6.006 
6.293 



C. B. C. 

Hall room Boys Twice a month 2,000 

The Barefoot Boy Star cast Not. 24 5,800 

Forgive and Forget Estelle Taylor Not. 10 5,800 

The Marriage Market Pauline Garon Dec 29 6.297 

Innocence Anna Q. Nilsson 'Jan. 26 5,923 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 

The Thief of Bagdad Douglas Fairbanks Mar. 29 12,00> 

PHIL GOLDSTONE 

His Last Race "Snowy" Baker Sept. 1 5,000 

Danger Ahead Richard Talmadge Dec. 29 5,000 

The White Panther Rex (Snowy) Baker Feb. 9 4,000 

Marry in Haste William Fairbanks Mar. 8 5,000 

D. W. GRIFFITH, INC. 

America Feature cast Mar. 8 14,000 

INDEPENDENT PICTURES CORP. 

Way of the Transgressor George Larkin Sept. 22 5,000 

In the Spider's Web Alice Dean Sept. 29 

LEE-BRADFORD 

Shattered Reputations Johnnie Walker Oct. 27 5,000 

LOWELL PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

Floodgates John Lowell Mar. 8 7,000 

MONOGRAM PICTURES 

The Mask of Lopez Fred Thompson Nov. 24 4,900 

The Whipping Boss Star cast Dec. 8 5,800 

ROCKETT-LINCOLN CORP. 

Abraham Lincoln • George A. Billings Feb. 2 12,000 

WM. STEINER PROD. 

Surging Seas Charles Hutchinson April 26 4,700 



230 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10. 1924 






IL 



oct ic 




On the Subject of Theatre Reseating 



P 



UTTING yourself in the other man's 
chair is the best way to find out 
whether he is comfortable in it or not. 



A comfortable chair will often dispose a 
patron favorably toward an otherwise only 
moderately interesting exhibition. 

An uncomfortable chair may send your 
patrons to another theatre. 

An audience comfortably seated is half won. 

The logical answer to uncomfortable theatre 
chairs is reseating by the 

American Seating Company 



Plans and Estimates Gladly Submitted 





American Seating Company 



General Offices: 



NEW YORK 
640-119 W. 40th St. 



CHICAGO 
4 East Jackson Blvd. 



BOSTON 
77-A Canal St. 



PHILADELPHIA 
1211-1. Chestnut St. 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



231 















pStSUIftMENT-G 




JTR 


UCT 


ION M 


aintenance] 



ill 



- 11 



Si 

1 



I 
I" 

j 



j I- 1 
i j 



Business Is Good! 

Reports from Supply Dealers in Various Parts of 
Country Show Optimistic Outlook 

Reports from theatre equipment supply dealers in various parts of 
the country indicate that business is good this Spring, and looks better 
than ever for the future. In an endeavor to learn just exactly what 
supply dealers are doing in the way of new business, Moving Picture 
World invited supply dealers to give information as to recent installa- 
tions. Just a few of the many replies received are printed herewith: 



T. H. Toler, of the Yale Theatre Supply 
Co., Kansas City, Mo., writes : 

"It gives us pleasure to be able to report 
to you that we are doing a thriving business 
down in this section, and the Yale Theatre 
Supply organization is coming to the front 
by leaps and bounds. We are enclosing 
herewith a copy of the March issue of the 
Yale Service Bulletin, in which a number 
of very important installations are men- 
tioned." 

Some Installations 

Among the installations were those of two 
Simplex Projectors and a Gardiner Gold 
Fibre Screen for Manager Means, Murray 
Theatre, Kansas City, and Simplex projec- 
tors of the New Memorial Hall, Independ- 
ence, Kansas. The bulletin says that W. T. 
Girardot, of Lucas, Kansas, will have Sim- 
plex-Madza projection; M. G. Kirkman, 
Strand Theatre, Hays, Kansas, will open his 
Rialto Theatre with Simplex-Mazda equip- 
ment; J. T. Salmans, Strand, Arkansas City, 
has a new 12 x 16 Gardiner Screen; E. C. 
Ober, Miltonvale, Kansas, steps into line 



with Simplex-Mazda equipment; M. L. 
Guier, Auditorium, Slater, installs G. E. 
Mazda equipment to replace that recently 
destroyed by fire; O. W. Persons, Gem The- 
atre, Minden, Neb., and L. A. Burson, Sun 
Theatre, Gothenburg, Neb., also installed 
Gardiner Screens. 

New Catalog 

"It might also be interesting to you to 
know that our new catalog is now in the 
hands of the printer. It will consist of 48 
pages, with a two-color cover. 

"We are pushing at the present time the 
Simplex Projector, the Gardiner Gold Fibre 
Screen, the Incandescent lamp equipment, 
American Reflecting Arc and the A. D. C. 
Automatic Curtain Control. The two latter 
commodities have just recently been added 
to our line. 

"It has been our observation in the past 
that the motion picture theatre supply house 
of the average type is always ready to sell 
those commodities which the customer comes 
in and asks for, but it is our belief that the 
(Continued on page 235) 





"THE SIGN OF THE LIPSTICK" 
Recently opened Cosmetic Room 
of the Strand Theatre, New York, 
where milady can beautify herself 
in comfort and privacy. 




PIUDJ ECTION 

EDITED BY F. H. RICHARDSON 



Up to Bob Welsh 

Walter Johnson, Projectionist, Park The- 
atre Champaign, 111., just simply rises on his 
rear legs and hands the Moving Picture 
World one. biff! bang! right square on the 
extreme end of its nose, thus: 

Dear Friend and Brother Richardson: Tou 
have my permission to edit and publish this 
letter, but beyond that you keep your nose 
out of it, as it is none of your (uses a 
naughty word here) business. This letter 
Is to the men who are engaged in motion 
picture projection, and who are not so far 
advanced in the art that they no longer 
bother to read matter pertaining to their 
profession. 

Write 

Tou who have been projecting "Topics of 
the Day" know that for some months past 
it has set forth this legend: "Write your 
Congressman today for tax reduction," which 
is darned good advice, if you ask me. 

For a long while we have both wanted 
and DESERVED more space for the projec- 
tion department. Think of it, men! Two 
pages (he said "measly pages," but I cut 
that, as being rough stuff. — Ed.) for the de- 
partment which tells us how to place the 
product of the whole industry before its 
buyer, the public, and this chap Van, who 
writes "Straight from the Shoulder" is 
boosting for ten pages! 

Van is all right, and I'm for him and his 
department. BUT when it comes to ten 
pages for that dope while we must worry 
along with LESS than two (the lens chart 
ad. reduces even our poor two) it is NOT 
fair. We have a right to more space and 
here is my plan to get it. 

Let each of us write a personal letter to 
Robert E. Welsh, Editor in Chief, telling 
him we want more space, and why we ought 
to have it. I am sure if we all (take notice 
of that ALL. — Ed.) take an interest and 
write Mr. Welsh, he will allot us more space. 

Let our slogan be "Write Editor in Chief 
Welsh for more space for the Projection 
Department," AND, Richardson, I don't want 
to hear you howling about a little extra 
work! We are going to put this thing 
through, whether you like it or not! Come 
on, boys, BOOST THIS THING ALONG. 

You're Full of Prunes! 

You're full of prunes! It would not make 
me more work because as it is I have to 
reply to oodles of letters by mail which I 
could reply to with no more work through 
the department, were there room. We 
really should have three pages. We once 
had four, but three is enough. Friend John- 
son has hit the Hon. nail square on the 
head. Moving Picture World gives space 
aceording to the APPARENT demand for 
matter. Exhibitors are interested in Straight 
from the Shoulder Tips, and they MAKE 
THAT FACT KNOWN. The projectionists, 
or at least the progressive ones, are inter- 
ested in the projection department, BUT 
confine their interest strictly to writing to 
that department once in God knows when. 
Except for the Department, Editor in Chief 
Welsh hardly knows they are living! I shall 
watch the effect of your letter with interest, 
BUT I doubt with a mighty doubt. The 
average man will read it, remark "That's a 
good scheme," and ask his buddy if he's 
going to the dance, as he lights another 
cigarette — not in the projection room, of 
course. 

Not a Slam 

That last was NOT meant as a slam at 
all. mind you. It just represents a general 
condition of apathy which prevails in such 
matters. A more practical way to accom- 



Bluebook School 



Each week, taking them in rotation, I 
am publishing five of the 842 questions 
from the list at the back of the Blue- 
book. In the book itself the number of 
the page or pages where the answer will 
be found is indicated. Five weeks after 
asking the questions, that answer which 
seems to be best will be published, together 
with the names of those sending satis- 
factory answers. Beginning ninety days 
after publication the best reply by a 
projectionist, other than Canadian and 
United States, will be published, together 
with names of projectionists of those 
countries who send good answers. 
WARNING: Don't merely copy you 
answer from Bluebook. Put the matter 
in your own words. I want to know 
whether or no you really understand 
what you have read in the Bluebook. 

This whole plan is calculated to get 
men to really study the Bluebook they 
have bought, and thus get real worth 
out of it. 

Question No. 40: What occasionally 
happens, or may happen, to the cement 
(balsam) between the front factor 
lenses ? 

Question No. 41: Should or should 
not the lenses of projection lenses be 
clamped tightly in their individual 
mounts ? 

Question No. 42: How should Gund- 
Iach-Manhattan projection lenses be re- 
assembled ? 

Question No. 43: Is it possible (and 
practicable) to repair a projection lens 
if one of its lenses be broken ? 

Question No. 44: Should the broken 
lens referred to in question No. 43 be 
sent to the manufacturer? 



plish results would, I believe, be to have 
local unions, as a body, communicate with 
Mr. Welsh, asking for an additional page, 
setting forth, at the same time, the fact that 
such additional page will be for the benefit 
of the industry, in that such information as 
is contained in the projection department 
helps to improve the final display of the 
finished product of the industry before the 
theatre audiences, who are buying it exact- 
ly in proportion to its excellence. Well, 
anyhow, we'll see what we'll see in this 
matter. Unquestionably if you ALL write 
we'll get the page alrighty right I 



Most Excellent 

Chauncey L. Greene, Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, voices his preference for the term, 
"Projection Room," as follows: 

I am most heartily in favor of "PROJEC- 
TION ROOM," and most thoroughly opposed 
to "Projector Room" as applied to the room 
in the theatre from which comes all in the 
world that the theatre has to sell. This 
room was (or if it was not, then it should 
have been) located for, designed for, finished 
for and equipped for one thing, and one 
thing only, and that thine- is PROJECTION. 

On the other hand, the room in which the 
producer views the screening of his produc- 
tions exists for the sole purpose of viewing 
these productions on the screen. The pro- 
jection of the productions is incidental to 
their viewing, but it is not the prime pur- 
pose for which the room was set aside. 

Accepting the self-evident truth that the 



name applied to anything should a« accu- 
rately as possible describe it, it seems indis- 
putable that the projection room of the the- 
atre has first claim on the term "Projection 
Room," and that the producer should adopt 
some other term, and one more accurately 
describing the room he now calls the pro- 
jection room. 

Excellent, though it "might be added that 
there is a projection room in connection 
with every screening room — a room entirely 
separate from the screening room, in which 
the projectors are located. The producer 
therefore really has both a screening room 
and a p'ojection room, hence he has no 
LEGITIMATE reason for objecting to the 
term projection room as indicating the en- 
closure for the projectors — the room from 
which pictures are projected. His. repre- 
sentative (or one of them at least), at the 
Society of Motion Picture Engineers, wants 
to call the whole works — screening AND 
projection room of the producer — the "pro- 
jection room." In fact he says the producer 
now does that, and since an awful, terrible, 
frightful amount of trouble would be caused 
the producer by being obliged to change to 
the extent of calling a thing by its right 
name — well, let's everybody call it something 
absurd and rather ridiculous. 



Good Practice 

In the very nature of things all manu- 
facturers must and do make many experi- 
ments in the endeavor to make improve- 
ments. Some of these experiments can be 
carefully worked out theoretically and all 
difficulties overcome. But in some instances 
an improvement (?) plays horse with every- 
body by passing every factory and other test 
until put into actual use, when it flops with 
a dull and very annoying thud. The engi- 
neer is extremely important in all develop- 
ment work, but it very, very frequently hap- 
pens that the "bug" in a new improvement 
or machine is discovered by the "man at 
the bench" who gives it its first thorough 
practical tryout. 

Non-Oiling Bearing 

In the past considerable trouble has been 
experienced by projectionists by failing to 
properly oil a motor attachment bearing 
which was in a not very convenient location. 
So the Nicholas Power Company, acting on 
what seemed to be very good grounds and 
best authority, adopted and put into use a 
non-oiling bearing of wood; having done 
this, they shouted "Hooray," "Huzzah" and 
"Banzai" (Jap word) and settled down to 
enjoy a life of free from bearing trouble. 
BUT — and there lies the rub — a non-oiling 
bearing which had worked so well in the 
tests, and by which the bearing folk swore 
a big swear, promptly caused the Power 
engineers to swear a big swear AT it, for it 
worked anything but well in actual practice. 
The company, however, without beating 
about the bush, frankly acknowledges that 
a little mistake had been made. 

Power's Letter 

I have before me a copy of a letter sent 
out to Power's distributors by Herbert Grif- 
fin, General Sales Manager of the Nicholas 
Power Company, which is thoroughly in line 
with good business practice. He states that 
inasmuch as the non-oiling bearing has not 
lived up to its reputation, the company will 
discontinue it in favor of a cast iron bear- 
ing having sufficient tolerance (clearance) 
to avoid all possibility of binding up even 



May 10, 1924 

The following sent excellent replies to 
questions Nos. 6 to 9: 

Harry Dobson, Toronto, Ontario, 6, 
6A, 7, 8, 9 and 10. 

Walter E. Lewis, Endicott N. Y., 6, 
6A, 7, 8, 9 and 10. 

N. L. Fell, Collingswood, N. J., 6, 6A, 
7, 8, 9 and 10. 

John Hubert, St. Louis, Mo., 6, 6A 
and 9. 

P. L. Anderson, San Francisco, 6, 6A 
and 8. 

Chas. C. Scribner, Mobile, Ala., 7, 9 
and 10. 

Dobson's answer to No. 6 was best, 
and was as follows: 

"What is meant by the Angle of Pro- 
jection ?" 

"The angle a line through the center of 
the projector optical system will make 
with a line horizontal with the center of 
the screen (not quite correct here — 
"with the center of a PERPENDICULAR 
screen" would be right. They all made 
the same error.) "Put into other words, 
suppose you had a screen setting per- 
fectly level" (Wrong again. What 
brother Dobson MEANS is all right, 
but a screen in the position he has in 
mind 1 would be perfectly perpendicular, 
and not "perfectly level." See how care- 
ful one must be in the matter of words? 
— Ed.), "with the projector up near the 
roof" (Wrong again. The screen 
MIGHT be up there too. I'm NOT crit- 
icising you, friend Dobson, but calling 
the attention of you ALL, through Dob- 
son, whom I know to be good natured, 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



I Bluebook Answers I 

'v 'J 

to the need for careful study of the 
FORM of your answer — of the impor- 
tance of setting your THOUGHT before 
us correctly in all details. "With the 
projector lens high above it" would 
have been technically correct. — Ed.). If 
you stretch a cord through center of op- 
tical system (along axis of projection 
would be better, though yours is cor- 
rect — Ed.) to center of screen, by meas- 
uring the angle this cord makes with 
one stretched perpendicular (at right 
angles to) center of screen we will get 
the "angle of projection." 

Note: Dobson knows. He has the 
right idea, but should be much more 
careful with his words. — Ed. 

No. 7 is answered best by Brother 
Dobson, too. The question is: "What is 
a standard candle?" 

Dobson says: "When measuring things, 
such as weights, measures, time, etc., in- 
cluding light intensity, all countries have 
a "standard" for the purpose, or each 
country adopts a certain, set rule. The 
official standard used in this country and 
England for measuring light is a sperm 
candle which consumes 120 grains of wax 
each sixty minutes. Modern practice has 
largely substituted the electric lamp as a 
standard. It is much more convenient 
and reliable." 



233 

Question No. 8: What is a "foot can- 
dle" or a "candle foot?" 

P. L. Anderson, San Francisco. He is 
the only one of you, except Dobson, who 
did not just about copy the Bluebook 
answer. Anderson says: "Taking the 
Standard candle for example, a certain 
light flux is sent out in every direction. 
This light spreads out and becomes 
weaker in illuminating power as the dis- 
tance^ is increased. The foot candle is 
the light density measured at one foot 
distance from the candle. 

Question No. 9: What is a "candle 
meter?" 

Dobson again: "The same as the Foot 
Candle, except that the distance is meas- 
ured at one meter instead of one foot." 

Question No. 10: What is the "Critical 
Angle?" 

Chas. C. Scribner, Mobile, Ala., says: 
"The critical angle is the angle a ray of 
light makes with the surface of glass 
just when it ceases to be refracted into 
the glass, and is, instead, entirely re- 
flected. In other words, if a ray of light 
strikes polished glass surface at varying 
angles it will be partly refracted into the 
glass and partly reflected back into the 
air. The amount reflected back will de- 
pend upon the polish of the surface and 
the angle of incidence, until the angle 
becomes so heavy that the light is all re- 
flected back into the air. The angle 
where this occurs is known as the "Crit- 
ical Angle" — which is a darned good an- 
swer, if you ask the editor. 



though improperly lubricated by Mr. Bone- 
headdo, the careless. 

The bearing which gives most trouble is 
the one just back of gear 757, figure 242, 
page 641 of Bluebook. The oil-holes are 
large and are countersunk to a great depth. 
Carelessness or laziness is the ONLY reason 
for failure to oil this bearing regularly, and 
if you don't, while it may not bind up, it 
certainly will wear out more rapidly. 

Reason for Heading 

Now here is the reason for the heading 
of this article : Mr. Griffin winds up his 
letter to the dealers with, "Naturally, it 
costs us a good deal of money to make re- 
placements, but it is our endeavor to have 
things as perfect as possible from the stand- 
point of yourselves, the customer, and our- 
selves, therefore, if you will return to us any 
and all motor attachments having wooden 
bearings, we will replace them with the me- 
tallic bearing without cost.'' This is good 
practice because if a thing is wrong and 
bad, it is not the fault of the customer, and 
it is therefore up to every reputable manu- 
facturer to make good. 

Such procedure is thoroughly in line with 
modern business practice and is evidence of 
the honesty of purpose of the manufacturers. 
Projector manufacturers, let me add, give 
you a really marvelous value for the money 
expended. In any line I can think of you 
would pay at least $1,000 for a machine such 
as the modern motion picture projector. And 
in many lines I can think of, once you had 
paid your $1,000 or more for equipment or 
machinery, that would be that, and if you 
want some bum part replaced you would 
dig deep and PAY for it. 



Very Interesting 

Recently I was invited to view a new color 
process demonstration in the screening room 
of the Capitol. Mr. Rothafel himself was 
present and was interested in the matter to 
the extent of making several suggestions and 
pertinent comments. 

The process differs from all other color 
p.rocesses of which I have knowledge, in that 
the whole thing, at least so far as projec- 
tion is concerned, is in the projection lens. 



The lens is divided into four equal com- 
partments running lengthwise of the lens. 
One of them is dead, and in each of the 
others is a colored substance, presumably 
glass. Each frame of the film contains 
three pictures, one-fourth the size of a reg- 
ular film photograph. All three of these are 
projected simultaneously, one through each 
of the colors. Of course each of the three 
images must be exactly superimposed on 
the others, but that is arranged for by a 
screw action attached to the lens. We there- 
fore have three separate and distinct photo- 
graphs, each taken with a separate color 
filter and all projected together, each 
through its own color, so that the result is 
natural colors on the screen, and without 
any possibility of fringing. 

Colors Good 
In the test we saw the colors were good, 



GET IT NOW! 

The Brand New 

Lens Chart 

By 

JOHN GRIFFITHS 

Here is an accurate chart which belongs 
in every projection room where carbon 
arcs are used. It will enable you to get 
maximum screen results with the equip- 
ment you are using. 

The news Lens Chart (size 15" x 20") 
is printed on heavy Ledger Stock paper, 
suitable for framing. 

Price $1.00 

Postpaid 

Chalmers Publishing Co. 

516 Fifth Avenue New York City 



though the reds and greens predominated, 
except in one picture of a plate of fruit in 
which were some ripe peaches. In this Mr. 
Rothafel thought the reds slightly predom- 
inated, but I thought the presentation was 
absolutely perfect, even the fuzz on the 
peaches standing out with all the natural 
delicacy of coloring. In another scene, the 
photograph of a bouquet this time, were 
some pink roses, the hearts of which were 
of deeper coloring. The effect was really 
wonderfully perfect. 

Just to what extent this process will prove 
itself available to motion pictures I do not, 
of course, know, but it certainly looks prom- 
ising. 

Joseph LaRose, formerly with Mr. Roth- 
afel, later production manager Rivoli and 
Rialto theatres, now production manager of 
the Fox Academy of Music, was present at 
the demonstration, as also was Mr. Smith, 
Supervisor of Projection for the Capitol 
Theatre. 

One comment I would make is this: Aside 
from the absorption by the colors, one- 
fourth of the projection lens is blocked off — 
dead, hence there is a total loss of one- 
fourth of the available light, which will be 
a rather serious matter, I am afraid. 



Cleaning Compound 

J. C. Patterson, St. Louis, Missouri, says: 
I have several reels of film I have used 
with a road show — showing small towns and 
for lodges, etc. It is very badly scratched 
and dirty, therefore very rainy. Can you 
advise me as to what I can use to clean this 
film? 

Carbon Tetrachloride will do the trick, 
PROVIDED you get it chemically pure. 
THE COMMERCIAL ARTICLE WON'T 
DO! I happen to know that the Eastman 
Kodak Company is making Carbon Tetra- 
chloride which is chemically pure, and there- 
fore suitable for cleaning your film, but 
whether they will consent to exchange it for 
filthy lucre— whether they have it on sale or 
not, I don't know. You might write George 
Blair, Sales Manager Motion Picture De- 
partment, asking its price and instructions 
for using it. After cleaning with Carbon 
Tetrachloride, film should be wound upon a 
drying drum for a short while. 



234 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



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THE CINEMA 

NEWS AND PROPERTY GAZETTE 

80-82 Wardour St. 
W. I. London, England 

Hast the largest certified circulation of the 
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Washington Houses 
Improve Equipment 

Ed. Dolan, who recently purchased the 
Princess Theatre, Cosmopolis, Wash., is giv- 
ing the house an extensive overhauling. He 
is installing, among other things, a Powers 
6-B Projector, with roller pin intermittent 
movement and Governor speed controls. In- 
stallation will be made by the Theatre Equip- 
ment Co., of Seattle. 

S. R. Stalcup, who is building a Com- 
munity Theatre at South 56th and M Streets, 
Tacoma, Wash., in the Yakima Avenue dis- 
trict, has let complete contracts to the Thea- 
tre Equipment Co., for projection, 457 seats, 
stage scenery, decorating, carpets, drapes, 
etc. The house will cost around $35,000, and 
will have a handsome marquee elaborating 
the front. 

The Cosmopolitan Film Exchange an- 
nounces installation of a projection machine 
in the Laurelhurst school, Portland, Oregon. 



Projector Firm in 
Incorporations List 

Albany — Including one company formed 
to manufacture motion picture projectors, 
ten companies incorporated in the motion 
picture industry in New York state during 
porated under the name of Capitol Machine 
the past week. This company was incor- 
Co., Inc., and is capitalized at $300,000. The 
directors include W. E. Greene, Julius 
Frankenberg, and L. J. Rosett, of New York 
city. Other companies chartered during the 
last few days were : 

Northside Amusement Corporation, capital- 
ized at $6,000, with Harris and Dorothy 
Stravits, Irving Oksenkrug, New York city; 
Mae Marsh Productions, Inc., $5,000, Mae 
Marsh Arms, Flint Ridge, Cal. ; Joseph N. 
Patch, Brooklyn ; Mae W. Marsh, New York 
city; Productions, Inc., $5,000, John Marks, 
K. S. Deitz, New York city; F. E. John- 
son, Brooklyn ; Cameo Theatres Co., Inc., 
$25,000, David and Benjamin Weinstock, New 
York city; Edwin Laitman, New York. 

Dahaus Amusement Co., Brooklyn, $25,000, 
David and Ethel Davis, Meyer Hausner, 
Brooklyn ; Theatre Hammerstein, Inc., $40,- 
000, Theodore Hammerstein, Ardsley; Alonzo 
Price, Henry Redfield, New York city; Gothic 
Pictures Corporation, with Louis Baum, 
New York city; Freda Freeman, I. Levine, 
Brooklyn ; Whitman Bennett Finance Cor- 
poration, Yonkers, Viola McLaughlin, Pearl 
Cohen, Sabra Ellis, New York; Instructive 
Pictures Corporation, R. B. Ittelson, Arthur 
Rosenbaum, New York; Mollie Marmor, 
Brooklyn, the amount of capitalization of the 
last three companies not being stated. 





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May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



235 



Business is Good! 

(Continued from page 231) 

field can be broadened by selling ideas. We 
are therefore pushing to the limit every 
meritorious article of equipment or of a sup- 
ply nature, that will be found useful or 
usable about the motion picture theatre. 

"We maintain two stores, one here in Kan- 
sas City and one in Oklahoma City, and have 
five traveling men on the road in our ter- 
ritory, which consists of Eastern Missouri, 
Kansas, Oklahoma and Northern Arkansas. 

Appreciate Interest 

"We desire to express our appreciation for 
the interest you have taken in the supply 
dealers, and we assure you of our belief 
that your support cannot fail to prove mu- 
tually helpful to all of us." 

The Southern Theatre Equipment Co., 
Oklahoma City, Okla., says : 

"We are pleased to respond to yours re- 
garding news of some of our recent sales and 
installations, one of which we are exceeding- 
ly proud of and that is a pair of Power 
6-B's with G. E. Incandescent equipments 
installed in the new Cozy Theatre in Okmul- 
gee, Okla., using % s ' ze Snaplite Lens — with 
a field and picture as bright as any 50 or 
60-amp. generator ever plastered it up there. 
Also two 6-B type 'E's' installed in the new 
Rialto Theatre, Tulsa; two 6-B's with In- 
candescent equipment in the Rialto, Welling- 
ton, Tex." 

From the Denver Theatre Supply Co., Inc., 
Denver, Colo., we received the following: 

"You might mention the fact that the new 
Sunshine Theatre at Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, owned by Joseph Barnett, of the 



Barnett Amusement Company, will open 
about May 1. Same will be equipped with 
two Power Type E projectors, motor gen- 
erator set, Minusa screen, Andrews opera 
chairs — in fact, the theatre is furnished 
throughout by us. 

New Alcott, Denver 

"The new Alcott Theatre of Denver 
opened with two Power 6B improved pro- 
jectors, motor generator set, Andrews opera 
chairs, Minusa screen; the Riviera Theatre 
of Parco, Wyoming, owned and operated by 
Thomas Love, opened with two Power 6B 
improved projectors, generator set, Andrews 
opera chairs, screen; the Rex Theatre at 
Rock Springs, Wyoming, owned by Sartoris 
and Crocker, opened with two Power 6B im- 
proved projectors, generator set, screen. The 
new Capitol Theatre at Cheyenne, Wyoming, 
has been furnished with two Power 6B type 
E projectors, Minusa screen, generator set.'' 

"Two months ago we made a complete 
Power installation in a high school, which is 
said to be the largest and finest of any high 
school in the United States," writes the 
Standard Theatre Equipment Corp., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 'The estimated cost goes well 
over the four million dollar mark. The 
equipment includes two Power 6B projectors 
equipped with 100 ampere high intensity arc 
lamps, one Power double dissolving stereop- 
ticon, one Power spot lamp and one double 
100 Fort Wayne motor generator set. 

Decorating by Larsen 

"All of the decorating in the entire high 
school, as well as the decorating and drapes 
in the auditorium of the school, was exe- 
cuted by H. A. Larsen, with whom our com- 
pany is affiliated. In fact the two companies 



have now consolidated and our office has 
been moved from 39 Western avenue to 1307 
Hennepin avenue. The space occupied by 
the two concerns includes all of the first 
and second floors and part of the third floor 
of a building having a street frontage of 50 
feet on the first floor and nearly 200 feet 
on the second and third floors." 

From the South 

The Southern Theatre Equipment Co., At- 
lanta, Ga., writes : 

"We are glad fo list the following sales 
and installations : Kettler Theatre, West 
Palm Beach, Fla., two Power 6-B improved 
projectors, type E equipment; E. L. Kuyken- 
dall, New Princess Theatre, Columbus, Miss., 
two Power 6-B improved projectors, type E 
equipment, double 75 ampere transverter, 
Minusa gold fibre screen, display frames, 
ticket selling machine, etc.; Rockwood 
Amusement Co., Rockwood, Tenn., two 
Power improved 6-B projectors, transformer 
and Minusa de luxe screen; J. M. Curtis, 
Marks, Miss., two Power 6-B projectors, 
chairs and other equipment; B. F. Liddon, 
Gem Theatre, Corinth, Miss., two Power 
6-B improved model projectors, transverter, 
ticket selling machine, and other equipment; 
Temple Theatre, Birmingham, Ala., two 
Power 6-B improved model projectors, high 
intensity equipment, transformer, Minusa de 
luxe screen, lobby display frame and other 
equipment." 

Indiana 

The Exhibitors Supply Co. of Indiana, Inc., 
Indianapolis, Ind., reports the sale of low 
intensity lamps to a number of the largest 
and best theatres in their territory. They 
also report the sale of Simplex machines, 
(Continuel on page 236) 




1886 



1924 



JAMES M.SEYMOUR 

LAWRENCE STREET, MECHANIC STREET AND KIRK PLACE 

ERSEY U. S. A. 

Solid Steel Dis c Center 
Hyatt Roller Bearings 
Rigid Square Frames 

Light Weight and 
Light Running 

Send For Bulletin 
No. 159 and Trade 
Discounts 

Why Pay Drug Store Prices for Ventilating and Cooling? 

THIRTY-SIX YEARS' EXPERIENCE in building Air Moving Machinery and installing Venti- 
lating Apparatus is at your disposal for the asking. SEND YOUR PLANS and I will send you 
Specifications for your requirements. I will sell you the BEST FANS Built in the Country at 
Commercial Prices. I will instruct you WH ERE and HOW to BUY the necessary Motors at 
FIRST COST. 

Your local sheet metal worker or carpenter can assemble and erect a cooling system from the plans furnished 
as well as it can he done by men sent hundreds of miles to do this work, whose time and expenses YOU HAVE 
TO PAY, and very often you get an inferior installation for which you pay double. 



NEWARK 




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236 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



Calvin Theatre, Northampton, Mass., 

Features Beautiful Lighting Effects 



The newly-opened Calvin Theatre, North- 
ampton, Mass., owned by Goldstein Brothers, 
is one of the best appointed and most mod- 
ern houses in New England, and when its 
beautiful lighting effects are brought into 
play, especially the crimson-hued lattice- 
work lights, in addition to the purple- 
crimson crystal chandeliers, the effect is one 
of exquisite beauty. The color scheme of 
the theatre is old gold and grey. The 
scenic decorations about the theatre are the 
work of the William Eckart studios of New 
York. The auditorium ceiling, the work of 
Charles Stifter, noted New York sculptor, 
is of ornamental plaster, embellished with 
striking decorative effects. 

The theatre is located in King street at 
Merrick lane and the building opens free on 
all sides. It has a majestic approach and is 
visible for a long distance. 

The foundation of the building is of re- 
inforced concrete; the roof of steel con- 
struction and the walls of brick. 

The entrance to the new Calvin is im- 
posing, and its arch, when illuminated, is 



Business Is Good! 

{Continued from page 235) 
transverter and complete equipment for new 
theatre to be opened about May 1 at Jasper, 
Indiana. Name of theatre will be Tivoli and 
will be managed by Jos. Gutzweiler. 

"Latest type Simplex machines with 
double bearing intermittent movements have 
been sold to Royal Theatre, New Castle, Ind. 
These machines replaced machines that 
were destroyed recently by fire. 

"Grand Theatre, Cambridge City, Ind., has 
reopened after having been closed for some 
time on account of a fire which did consid- 
erable damage to the interior of the theatre. 
Theatre was newly decorated and the latest 
type Simplex machines were installed. 
Keystone, Indianapolis 

"Keystone Theatre, Indianapolis, has been 
leased by Mr. Appel, of Gregory and Appel, 
real estate dealers, Indianapolis. House is 
being thoroughly remodeled and latest type 
Simplex machines and other equipment has 
been installed. 

"Central Amusement Co., Indianapolis, 
Ind., has installed the new Simplex double 
bearing intermittent movements in the ma- 
chines in all their houses. 

"Billy Conners, manager of Lunalite The- 
atre, Marion, Ind., has purchased low inten- 
sity lamps for the Lunalite. 

"We are also glad to report the sale of a 
number of Kolograph semi-portable ma- 
chines for which we are distributors. The 
Kolograph machine is manufactured in In- 
dianapolis by the Kolograph Co." 

Getting Their Share 

"We are certainly getting our share of the 
spring business," says the S. & S. Film & 
Supply Co., Pittsburgh, "and can quote the 
following recent installations and sales we 
have closed in the representative houses of 
our territory. The majority of these thea- 
tres were closed for complete equipments, 
consisting of Power projectors, Westing- 
house motor generator sets, screens, etc. 

"The Grand Theatre, California, Pa.; the 
Ritz Theatre, Indiana, Pa.; the Penn The- 
atre, New Castle, Pa.; Colonial Theatre, 



well silhouetted against the city's night 

skyline. 

There is a marquise of special design with 
electric lights arranged on a flasher motor. 
The outer vestibule is of terrazzo and 
marble and contains poster and photograph 
display frames, especially constructed. The 
box office is in the center of the vestibule 
and is of marble with hand carved wood- 
work. It is equipped with two automatic 
ticket sellers. 

From the vestibule entering the lobby on 
the left side is an additional ticket office, 
which can be used in case of reserved seat 
salts in advance of the shows. 

Mezzanine Floor 

On either side of the rear of the orchestra 
floor are the grand marble staircases lead- 
ing to the mezzanine floor and the balcony. 
From the mezzanine floor there is an easy 
approach to the balcony. 

The mezzanine floor also is of excellent 
construction, being of California gum-wood. 
Here are located the well-appointed women's 



Masontown, W. Va. ; Western Pennsylvania 
Amusement Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.; Indiana 
Theatre, Indiana, Pa.; Richelieu Theatre, 

Blairsville, Pa." 

Salt Lake City 

The Salt Lake Theatre Supply Company, 
132 East Second South street, Salt Lake, is 
Stalling one of the most completely 
equipped and modern projection booths ever 
placed in a theatre west of the Mississippi 
River, in the new Peery Egyptian Theatre, 
in Ogden. This equipment is to consist of 
three of the latest type Simplex motion pic- 
ture projecting machines, fully equipped with 
the latest lighting appliances. Other appli- 
ances and supplemental lighting effects will 
include the General Electric Company's most 
recent contribution to the movie picture 
world, amplifying and giving a tremendously 
wide range to all lighting and projection 
effects. 

From Oklahoma City, Okla., the Yale The- 
atre Supply Company writes: 

Oklahoma City 

"Our office has been extremely busy for the 
past few weeks, and during this time we 
have placed two type S Simplex moving pic- 
ture projectors in the Palace Theatre at 
Duncan, Oklahoma; equipped the American 
Legion at Kingfisher with the Simplex 
Mazda equipment; the Rialto Theatre at 
Hammon with the Simplex Mazda equip- 
ment and we are installing two Simplex 
Mazda equipped machines in the Grand 
Theatre at Kingfisher, Oklahoma. Two reg- 
ular carbon equipped Simplex machines 
have been installed in the Runyon Theatre, 
at Barnsdall, and two Simplex Mazda 
equipped machines are en route to the Pal- 
ace Theatre at Hobart, Oklahoma. 

Hollis, Smith, Morton Co., Inc., Pittsburgh, 
report that they have equipped the follow- 
ing new theatres, which are not yet open, 
but will be within the next month : J. J. 
McFaddon, Renoco, Pa.; W. G. Maute, 
Maute Theatre, Irwin, Pa.; Amusement Hall, 
Carmichaels, Pa. 

This includes Simplex projectors, screens, 
Hertner transverters and Vallen curtain ma- 
chines. 



and men's retiring rooms, private telephone 
booths, check rooms and manager's office. 
The mezzanine lounge has drinking foun- 
tains and writing facilities and a true home- 
like atmosphere prevails there. 

More than 200 tons of steel alone were 
fabricated into the construction of the bal- 
cony. There are no posts and an unobstructed 
view is had of the stage from all seats on 
both floors. 

40-Foot Stage 

The Calvin has a 40-foot stage and pros- 
cenium opening 36 feet in length and 25 feet 
high. The stage is of ampie size to accom- 
modate any sort of road show. 

Many of the leading manufacturers of 
theatrical stage equipment were called upon 
by the Goldstein Brothers to make installa- 
tions on the Calvin's stage. The Worcester 

ectrtc and Manufacturing Company built 
the large stage switchboard, which is of the 
dead front type. 

The scenery for the Calvin was built by 
James Kennedy, who has charge of the Gold- 
stein Brothers' scenic studios in Holyoke. 
Maurice Tuttle, scenic artist for the circuit, 
acted in that capacity for the Calvin and has 
turned out a veritable work of art. The main 
drop curtain has upon it a beautiful Yose- 
mite Valley scene. It was executed from an 
enlarged photograph of an actual scene. 



First in the field, Moving Picture 
World still excels in exhibitor service 
departments. "Straight From the Shoul- 
der Reports," "Newest Reviews," "Ex- 
hibitors' News and Views," "Selling the 
Picture to the Public," "Projection" and 
"Better Equipment" — you can't get their 
like anywhere else. 



THEATRE ORGAN 

Pianino with violin and flute pipes, colt $950 new ; 
cash $550. just like new. 

Style G Wurlitzer Organ, just like new, cost $2200; 
cash $1200, contains violin, flute, pipes, drums and 

mandolin. 

Orcheslrlan, excellent shape, $6000. 

Inquire HAYES MUSIC COMPANY 

422 Superior Street Toledo, Ohio 



The World's Market Place 
FOR SALE 

Advertising under this heading $S 
pmr inch. Minimum ipse* on* inch. 



Motion Picture Cameras and the World's 
largest market of second hand and n»w 
instruments, priced from $50.00 up. 

Send for big catalogue and bargain U*t. 

BASS CAMERA COMPANY 

109 NORTH DEARBORN CHICAGO 



FILMS FOR SALE 

"The Stafford Mystery." featuring Blllle Burke; — 
"Mistaken Identity." featuring Anita King; — "Ad- 
tentures of Jimmy Dale," 32 reels, featuring E. 
Lincoln, — also large selection other Features. Seriate. 
Comedies. Travelogues, etc. Send for our latest 
catalogue. 

GUARANTY PICTURES COMPANY 
126 WEST 46TH STREET NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address: "Qaplctco" 



May 10, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



237 



Cooling your house 
in hot weather 

It's a "cinch" with the 
Typhoon Cooling System. 

You simply snap the switch (lo- 
cated in your office or booth) — 
and instantly your audience feels 
a cool, refreshing breeze stream- 
ing through the house. No drafts 
— no noise. 

Easily and quickly installed. Provides 
perfect ventilation in cool weather. 

Write for Booklet 32. 

TYPHOON FAN COMPANY 

345 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 

Philadelphia Jacksonville New Orleans Dallas Los Angeles 



RAVEN "HAFTONE" SCREENS 

are used by 

FAMOUS PLAYERS 

for the 

"COVERED WAGON" 
"TEN COMMANDMENTS" 

and other 

SUPER PRODUCTIONS 
"They Stay Put" 

RAVEN SCREEN CORPORATION 



345 WEST 39TH STREET 



NEW YORK CITY 



FIRE! 

May result from badly installed electrical equipment «r 
poorly chosen materials. 

Hallberg's Motion 
Picture Electricity 

$2.50 Postpaid 

is a book that is as good as an insurance policy if you heed 
its advice and get the best equipment for your needs, and 
know how to have it properly installed. 

CHALMERS PUBLISHING CO. 



AMERICAN REFLECTING ARC 

LATEST IN PROJECTION EQUIPMENT 
Patents Applied For 




OUR DISTRIBUTORS 



Atlanta, Oa. 
Southern Theatre Equipment Co. 
Boston, Mass. 
Eastern Theatre Equipment Co.. Inc. 
Chicago, III. 
Exhibitors Supply Co.. Ino. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
The Dwyer Bros. & Co. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Exhibitors Supply Co., Ino. 
Dallas, Texas 
Southern Theatre Equipment Co. 
Denver, Colo. 
Exhibitors Supply Co., Ino. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Exhibitors Supply Co. of Indians. Inc. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Tale Theatre Supply Co.. Inc. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
Exhibitors Supply Co., Inc. 

Minneapolis, 
Exhibitors Supply 



New Orleans, La. 
Southern Theatre Equipment Co. 
New York, N. Y. 
Independent Movie Supply Co., Ino. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Southern Theatre Equipment Co. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Exhibitors Supply Co., Ino. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Philadelphia Theatre Supply Co. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Hollls, Smith, Morton Co., Ino. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
Salt Lake Theatre Supply Co. 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Theatre Equipment Supply Co. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Exhibitors Supply Co., Ino. 
Washington, D. 0. 
Washington Theatre Supply Co. 
Minn. 
Co., Inc. 



AMERICAN REFLECTING ARC CORPORATION 

24 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASS, 



516 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 




vie name of 

is synonymous 
"Witfi the best 
in VaudeOille 



Similarly, in the 
equipment of Keith 
Houses nothing is 
omitted that will 
contribute to the 
comfort and con- 
venience of Keith 
patrons. 

And, as a matter 
of course, all of the Keith Houses are liberally equipped with 

DIXIE CUP 

^Penny IfcmdincpVlacfiines 

Silently, throughout performance and intermission alike, these 
machines provide patrons with white, round, unwaxed Dixie 
Cups, delightful to drink from — and SAFE. 

The service maintains itself without cost, and yields a well 
worth-while revenue to the House. 

Write for sample Dixies and details of Dixie Cup Penny Vendor Service. 

{ndividval Drinking (vp (ompany. Jnc- 

Original Makers oftfc Paper Cup 

EASTON, PA. NEW YORK, N. Y. 

With Branch*, at Philadelphia, Chicago, Cleveland, Baltimore, Us Aaftlos. 



238 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 10, 1924 



EASTMAN 
POSITIVE FILM 

Make sure the release print is on Eastman 
Positive Film and you make sure that the 
photographic quality of the negative is car- 
ried through to the screen for your audiences 
to enjoy. 

Look for the identification "Eastman" 
"Kodak" in black letters in the film margin. 



Eastman Film, both regular and 
tinted base, is available in thou- 
sand foot lengths. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Robert-Morton 
Unit OrPan 




Gratifying Evidence 

of 

ROBERT-MORTON 
SUPREMACY 



"The Robert-Morton installed for me 
at the Astor Theatre exceeded even our 
fondest expectations." 

S. L. Rothafel, New York 

"We have fourteen and consider 
Robert-Morton most artistic achieve- 
ment." 

Saenger Amusement Co., 

New Orleans 

"Congratulations on Robert-Morton. 
We are thoroughly convinced of its 
merits." 

Universal Film Co., New York 

F. A. Flader, Gen. Mgr. Theatres 

"Consider Robert-Morton highest class 
organ money can buy." 

California Theatre, Los Angeles 



The Photo Player Co. 



NEW YORK 
148 West 46th St. 



CHICAGO 
845 So. Wabash Ave. 



BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 



Edwin H. Lemare, Dean of 
American Concert Organists, 
seated at the Robert-Morton 
Console, University of 
Southern California. 





NEW 
ROBERT -MORTON 
CO-OPERATIVE 
SELLING 
PLAN 



Robert-Morton Organs arc now 
built in sizes and styles to suit every 
type of theatre — large or small. 
Mail coupon for full details of New 
CO-OPERA TIVE SELLING 
PLAN. 



The Photo Player Co. 

148 West 46th St., New York City 

GENTLEMEN: Please send catalog and full de- 
tails of your new selling plan on Robert-Morton 
I'nit Organs. 

Name of Theatre 

Seating Capacity 

Name 

City State 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



Harold Lloyd 

IN 

"Girl Shy" 



Now on its second big week 
at New York's Strand. Has 
broken every Lloyd record 
for that house. Crowds! 
Crowds! Crowds! 



A Patne Picture 



Moving" Picture 




Vol, 68, No. 3 



May 17, 1924 



PRICE 25 CENTS 



Profit-Makers 




os mop o lit a 



Published h CHALMERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 



«« FIFTH AVE. 
NEW YORK CITY 



Ha-loro* as tesail elaas ■attwr Jaaa 17, ltd, at tka Trmt Oflaa at If ew York, If. Y., nndtr th« act of March J, 1479. Printed waokly. O 00 a j» 



ANNOUNCEMENT 
EXTRAORDINARY 

Be sure you get your copies of the 
Motion Picture News and the 
Universal Weekly — out next week, 
issues dated May 24th— for Univer- 
sale greatest Fall Announcement. 
Beautifully illustrated, two colors. 
If you do not receive your Univer- 
sal Weekly, write the Editor, 1600 
Broadway, IV. Y. 




ENTURY 

COMEDIES 



A/fEET THE FOLKS! Here are the 
stars who uncork the riot of fun 
in which your audience delights! Spice! 
Pep! Variety! Here is the company of 
infinite jest who pack these two-reel 
features with gales of laughter. The 
Century Follies Girls, Pal the Dog, Al 
Alt, Buddy Messinger, Spec O'Donnell, 
Martha Sleeper, Hilliard Karr, Jack 
Earle, Harry McCoy, Harry Sweet, 
Arthur Trimble, Waunda Wilie — and 
now, Bubbles! These are the names 
that make the fans ask for more! And 
in Century Comedies you will find that 
dependable supply of clean, crisp, 
comedy that gets the business! 

"Consistently Good" 
Released One Every Week Thru 

UNIVERSAL 




I 





May 17, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



243 




POLA NEGRI 



IN 



MEN 



DIMITRI BUCHOWETZKI 
Production 

Supported by Robert W. Frazer, 
Robert Edeson and Joseph Swickard 

Story by Dimitri Buchowetzki 
Screen play by Paul Bern 

Presented by Adolph Zukor and Jesse L. Lasky 

THE famous emotional star in a 
Parisian romance produced by 
Europe's foremost director. But 
filmed entirely in Paramount's 
studios with an all-American sup- 
porting cast. 

Easily the greatest Pola Negri 
picture so far. The story of a girl 
who, tricked by men, becomes rich 
and famous and makes men her 
playthings. A happy ending. A 
corking box-office wallop released 
May 26. 



PRODUCED BY 



QaramxMUhb 

SPRING 

AND 

SUMMER 

clean-ups/ 



[FAMOUS PlAYER^lASIOfTORPORAnON J 



Released 

in May 

and June 

No need to play! weak pic- 
tures this Spring and Summer. 

Here are five big- new Para- 
mount gold-getters all released 
in May and June — just when 
you need them most! 

Gripping stories, celebrated 
stars, famous directors, good 
enough to fill any theatre in 
any weather. 

Book every one of them! 

Qaramount pictures 



244 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17, 1924 



Big paramount pictures Now 



- 

a 




A SAM WOOD PRODUCTION 



* 



BLUFF 



// 



WITH 

ACNES ANTONIO 
AYRES MORENO 

From the story by 

RITA WEIMAN and 
JOSEPHINE L. QUIRK 

Scenario by Willis Goldbeck 

Presented by Adolph Zukor and Jesse L. Lasky 

A SPARKLING, fast moving 
comedy-romance produced 
by the man who made "Prodigal 
Daughters" and "Bluebeard's 
8th Wife." 

Two famous stars in the lead- 
ing roles. New York's snappy 
roof gardens and artists' studios 
as the setting. And those star- 
tling gowns! Released May 12. 



CL paramount Qicture 




r 



■ 



; aVICTOR FLEMING production 

*CODE OF 
THE SEA' 

WITH 

ROD LA ROCQUE 
JACQUELINE LOGAN 

Story by Byron Morgan 
Adapted by Bertram Millhauser 

Presented by Adolph Zukor and Jesse L. Lasky 

A ROARING, crashing love- 
melodrama of the sea. Noth- 
ing better for warm weather. 
Written by the author of the 
famous Wallie Reid auto racing 
yarns and produced by the man 
who made "To the Last Man" and 
"The Call of the Canyon." 

A great cast and a big, elabo- 
rate production. Note the release 
date — June 2. 



PRODUCED BY 

FAMI lUs PI.VV frL> l\sio corporation ■ 



cparamourU: 



May 17, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



245 



When you need them most / 




a JOSEPH HENABERY production 

"THE , 

GUILTY ONE 

WITH 

AGNES AYRES 

Supported by Edward Burns, 
Cyril Ring, Craufurd Kent 
and Clarence Burton 

From the play by 
Michael Morton and Peter Traill 
Screen play by Anthony Coldewey 

Presented by Adolph Zukor and Jesse L. Lasky 

A GREAT picturization of the 
sensational Broadway play. 
The story of a young wife daz- 
zled into indiscretion, and how 
she saved herself. Every woman 
will eat it up ! 

Coming to you on June 9. 

d paramount picture 



pictures 




WILLIAM de Ml LIE 

PRODUCTION 

THE BEDROOM 
WINDOW* 

with 

May McAvoy, Malcolm 
MacGregor, Ricardo Cortez, 
Robert Edeson, George 
Fawcett and Ethel Wales 

Story and screen play by 

CLARA BERANGER 

Presented by Adolph Zukor and Jesse L. Lasky 

TIT HAT a title for exploitation! 
* * And what an exciting, baf- 
filing, hilariously funny mystery- 
romance-melodrama the picture 
is! Better even than "Grumpy" 
and the best William de Mille 
picture ever. Released June 16. 

PRODUCED BY 



FAMOUS PLAYERS JASK* CORPORATION 

AOQL'tlXUHOR JISSILLA9KY C iCIl B 0.1*1.0. 



WHA T 

SHALL 



^ Happy With Her 
Husband and Wabe 



Tit 




without warning comes a 
terrible accident As a result her husband, who 
had been loving and devoted, becomes a dif- 
ferent person. He refuses to recognize her as 
his wife. He denies his child. 

She faces the world alone with her baby. Not 
only must she care for herself and the child, 
but the great problem of caring for her little 
one while she works confronts her. 

What Shall She Do? What Would You Do? 

There is one course open to her. Shall SheTake It? 

Here is a story, transferred to the screen by the 
master hand of Frank E. Woods, that strikes at 
the very core of a vital social problem. 

Dorothy MacKaill, who has won her way in 
the hearts of the American public, has never 
been seen in a more appealing role. In her sup- 
port there is a distinguished cast including 
John Harron, William V. Mong and 
Louise Dresser. 

Here is a picture, Mr. Exhibitor, 
that means more money for you and 
more prestige Jor your theatre. 

Released May u, 192.4 

BOOKING RESFR VA TIONS NOW. 




starring 





1 



// 



Dorothy 
Mackaill 



A Frank Wood Production 
with 

JOHN HARRON LOUISE DRESSER 
and WILLIAM V. MONG 



Directed by 
JOHN G. ADOLFI 

Story, supervision and editing by 
FRANK WOODS 




HODKINSON fteIea$e 



James Kirkwood 






(Distributed by HODKINSON 




SUPPORTED By 

MARGARET 
LIVINGSTON 

STORY BY 
C. GARDNER SULLIVAN 

DIRECTED 8y 

WILLIAM BEAUDINB 

PRESENTED By 

REGAL PICTURES 
INCORPORATED- 



FOREIGN DISTRIBUTOR. 
W M VOGEL, DISTRIBUTING 
CORP. 




J. A. Partington, Granada Theatre, 
San Francisco, Calif., Reports — 

San Francisco, Calif., 
May 4, 1924. 

W. W. Hodkinson Corp., 

469 Fifth Avenue, 
New York. 

"Congratulations on 'WANDERING HUS- 
BANDS.' It is hundred percent all-the-year 
picture. Opened at Granada today to capacity 
afternoon and evening and they liked it from 
start to finish. Kirkwood and Lee are at their 
best. Picture is sure-fire audience and hope to 
see more like it, especially this season. Regards." 

J. A. PARTINGTON. 

The Proof of the Picture Is in the Showing 
The Answer Is — Grab it Quick 



Prints in AH Exchanges 




Now Booking 



Season 1924-1925 Onirty First- Run Pictures 



250 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17. 1924 



comes another new red hot box office 
picture backed by showmanship that 
means money to you. Here's a great 
story of hot Gypsy blood, wild 
youth, stern parents, mad adventure, 
— It speeds across the screen with 
action, fine acting and sure fire enter- 
tainment. It's great for the flappers, 
and still greater for mothers and 
fathers. See this picture — 




723 SEVENTH AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 
EXCHANGES EVERYWHERE 

Sales Office United Kingdom: 
R-C Pictures Corp., 26-27 D'Arblay St., 
Wardour St., London W. 1, England 



And LOOK at this Cast! 

Ralph Lewis, Derelys Perdue, Lloyd Hughes, 
Joseph Swickard, Emily Fitzroy 

A Real Audience Picture 

FILM BOOKING OFFICES 

of America, Inc. 



May 17, 1924 MOVING PICTURE WORLD 253 



L285.320U Theatre- 




g 



oeis 



V 



will see this 
advertisement- 

maiiy 0f them 

*°\ live in your city. 
t W«'*fV Will you be ready 

< c A e ^ * t0 casn i n on 




Copvof /IP ^ 
advertisement V>" ^ P lp ^ms* 0 " 

appearing in . an* Me &. in 

Photoplay ~* 
Picture-play ^ «^ ^ 
Classic V* * &j&& c 
Motion Picture o^'co^ 
Magazine ^ H 

Combined cinculcdion ^ Encore 

1,285,320 ^^^^^ picture^ 

Associated Exhibitors 

Physical Distributor Pathe £xehange./nc. Arthur S. Kane, President Foreign Representative Sidney Garrett 



254 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17, 1924 



Announcing 

"PUPPY LOVE STORIES" 

A series of eighteen two reel athletic comedies 

Directed by Robert Eddy 



Clean, Entertaining Feature Comedies Devoid 
of Slap Stick and Burlesque 

COLLEGE TYPES COLLEGE ATMOSPHERE 




The Girl" 



Edna Hanam 

Now in Production at F. B. O. Studios, Hollywood, California 

HOLLYWOOD PHOTOPLAY PRODUCTIONS 

L. S. Ramsdell, President Randall Faye, Supervisor of Productions 



May 17, 1924 

CARLLAEMMLE 

presents 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



255 




These are the logical 
successors to "The 
Leather Pushers" 

because — - 

they have action 

— the thrills of horseracing 
they have romance 

— beautiful love scenes 
they have comedy 

— the kind that made the 
"Leather Pushers" famous 

Play them to win! 



Universal'* Greatest Announce- 
ment, beautifully illustrated in 
two colors, in the M. P. News and 
the Universal Weekly issues of 
May 24th — out next week. Be 
ture you get your copies ! 



Starring 

BILLY 




Ask meabout horses and 
II give v^u The dope— 

I dont get them at al — 




SULLIVAN 



popular star of 
"The Leather Pushers" as 
•THE INFORMATION KID" 

Supported by 
Shannon Day, Duke Lee, 
Caesare Gravina, James 
T. Quinn and others. 

From the world famous 
Red Book Magazine racing 
stories by 
GERALD BEAUMONT 

Directed by 
EDWARD LAEMMLE 



UNIVERSAL JEWEL SERIES 



256 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17, 1924 



^Sweek 

oAt 

GRAU MAN'S RIALTO 
LOS ANGELES 



JO n^v ^ • 

- 0 ,SONED PARAD.SE 

mar Young and Gasnier seem 
truly inspired. Clara Bow, that 
marvelous child, is a ,oy every 

roinute . Carmel Myers srren 



TBD TAYLOR jl 

ko« m a r r antic ^'^o- 

"afty and sympathetic, falling 
■nto new patterns. Interesting' 
at moments fascinating. An ar- 



GUY PRICE in the ^ 

"Filling all expectations, it is a 
picture only too true of the 
comedy, tragedy and drama 
that is to be found in any gamb- 
ling centre. The whole affair 



The wh< 
is excellent and the 
lulls." 



ling centre. 

1 action never 



*W The ca^' E " 
Posed of We i, , a8t ,s c °n>- 

^ *ey Z P ' ayerS 
,°f ">=mselve, Car^ B COUm 

Monte Carlo a Ur ^ch ^ 



Forbidden 
Story of 
Paris and 




is 

PARA 







IS 




GASNIER S Newest Production - Presented by B.P. 5CHULBERG 

Jrom the novel by Robert W.*Serv ice ~ adapted by Waldemar young 
with CLARA BOW- KENNETH HARLAN ~ CARMEl MYERS - RAYMOND GRIFFITH 



Preferred Pictures 

Corporation 

BP5chulbeiri Pres (K\JG.Bachmonn. Oieas 



I6&0 BiOtduj New York 



'/////////////////////////////////////////J tltllttllltlMmillltlHHIIIrMilttltlM 



Foreign Distributors : Export and Import Film Co., Inc. 



May 17, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



257 




FILM BOOKING OFFICES 

OF AMERICA, Inc. 723 Seventh Avenue: New York City 



258 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17, 1924 



EXHIBITORS 

It's How You Show Up At The Show 
Down That Counts* 




When something goes wrong with the projection 
you want help and you want it mighty quick. 

$6:22 WOULD SOUND CHEAP TO YOU THEN. 

DON'T PUT IT OFF. 

The Best Time To Get This Great Book Is NOW! 
Price $6^2 at your dealer or postpaid direct from 

Chalmers Publishing Company 

516 Fifth Avenue 

New York City 



May 17, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



259 



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260 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17. 1924 



It's a grippe*/ Will hold 
any audience in the World/ 



Never has there been a pic- 
ture with so many tense 
moments. Never a picture 
that grips the emotions, hold- 



ing one on the edge of his 
seat from start to finish as 
this one. "Those Who Dance" 
is a wonder. They'll all like it. 




5& 



MoviKg Picture 

WORLD 

Founded jn 1<)07 J>y %J. P. Chalmers 




The Editor's Views 

What Is ''Balance" in a Programme? — The Flapper and the Teacher 
Block Booking Again on Top of the Heap 



ON an occasion in the past, we undertook to 
proclaim the "Chronicles of America" series 
worthy of editorial comment. Here, in our 
estimation, is the ideal opportunity for the exhib- 
itor to tie in concretely and definitely with the most 
critical element in his community. 
Now a new problem has arisen. 
In the case of the "Chronicles," the phrase, ''the 
cooperation of your school and church authorities," 
is not an empty one. Backed by the prestige and 
assurance of Yale University's name, together with 
a really comprehensive campaign of cooperation, 
the showing of the subjects in most cases becomes 
a community event. 

This is where the trouble enters. 
The School Superintendent, who has made a 
vigorous effort to secure the attendance of his 
pupils and teachers at the local showing, comes 
away a bit miffed, when he finds that he has also 
aided the success of a jazz picture of the most hectic 
type. 

He feels that he has been bilked. His enthusiasm 
for cooperation on the later subjects in the series is 
considerably dampened. And one of the most ad- 
mirable opportunities the industry has ever had for 
theatre and community linking is endangered. 



WITH many exhibitors this tying up of the 
"Chronicles" with ill-considered subjects on 
the balance of the program may readily be 
ascribed to thoughtlessness. 

In other cases it is very probable that the exhibitor 
has decided, "Well, I have one high-brow subject 
now, so I'll go to the other extreme for my feature 
and get the proper program balance." 



If this is the thought, we cannot too strongly 
urge the exhibitor that this is one occasion when he 
cannot expect to digest his cake and still find it re- 
posing on the pantry shelf. 

When school officials cooperate on a showing, as 
they can be induced to help on the "Chronicles," 
then it is only the part of wisdom — and fair play, 
too — for the theatre to go the limit on cooperation 
with them. 

Program "balance," secured by pandering to two 

widely separated extremes, may easily defeat its 

purpose by sending both classes away dissatisfied. 
* * * 

THE Fall announcements are under way. We 
have glanced over quite a number of the 
schedules — and finish the task considerably 
encouraged. 

First reactions are generally reliable, and our first 
reaction to the wealth of material offered for the 
coming season is that the theatres of the country 
are going to have a plenitude of satisfying, worth- 
while entertainment to present. 

In good years and lean years — the picture is the 
answer. So there is encouragement for all of us in 
the brightly promising schedules. 

One interesting phase of the forecasts is that we 
are once more to have "Famous Forties," "Dread- 
naught Tens," and so on. A year ago all the talk 
was of "each picture on its own merits," "no block 
booking," "see the picture before you book it." 

The pendulum is swinging again. As might have 
been expected. 

The theory of single picture booking is ideal. 
From both producer's and exhibitor's viewpoint a 
most convincing case can be made out against the 
evils of block booking. 

(Continued on follorving page) 



262 



MOV I A G PICTURE WORLD 



May 17, 1924 



The Editor's Views 

(Continued from preceding page) 

But the theory encounters trouble when it clashes 
with the problem of distribution costs. Which is 
not alone the distributor's worry, for these are costs 
that are shared by production and exhibition alike. 

We have never held with those who feel that the 
small exhibitor spends sleepless nights worrying 
over the dread bugaboo of block booking. Often, 
we believe, the small man closes up too much of his 
time with one or two flourishes of the pen. 

It is in the happy medium that efficient booking, 
efficient selling, and efficient production policies can 
be found. 



3 



A face that you will be meeting 
more and more around the film gath- 
erings in the months to come. Been 
in our midst quite a while, but hover- 
ing in the background. F. C. Munroe 
is the name. Worth watching — worth 
knowing. For his charmingly engag- 
ing personality, for the strides that 
the Hodkinson Corporation is making 
since he stepped to the foreground. 
Have you noticed a week go by re- 
cently that didn't bring the announce- 
ment of some new product — REAL 
product, too — for Hodkinson? 



We Mast Have Oar "Problems" 

ONE trouble about the "Summer picture problem" is 
that for the majority of picture theatres it isn't a 
"Summer problem" at all, but rather a September 
and October worry. Each Fall sees a flood of wonderful 
screen entertainment available for the big first runs. There 
are only four weeks in a month. By the time the first run 
has set in dates and the subsequent houses receive their 
opportunity we are well into November. And the later 
runs have found themselves with nothing but the left-overs 
of the Summer season to offer returning patrons in Sep- 
tember and October. 



Hiram Abrams asks no other title 
than that of Salesman — in the fullest 
sense of the word — but this week we 
will have to label him Showman. For 
"Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall" Hi 
Abrams has turned the exterior of the 
Criterion Theatre into a show that is 
worth the price of admission if you 
never pass the man at the door. We 
won't attempt to describe it, but as 
soon as photos are taken will let you 
see it. It's "stopping them in their 
tracks" on Broadway and holding 
them — and selling Mary Pickford and 
the picture. 





Jack Meador. Gets in our private 
Hall of Fame this week for a claim 
to the "All Around" title. Whether 
it is circus exploitation, dignified big 
picture presentation, week in and week 
out routine star and production pub- 
licity, or Broadway engagement — you 
find that Metro staff measuring up. 
Trade paper ads, press books, mer- 
chandise tie-ups — no matter what the 
need, you find them hitting the mark. 
An achievement. Some men can do it 
on one picture, some on a few a year; 
it takes something to hold to the pace 
fifty-two weeks a year — and for many 
years. 



On To Boston! 

WE have every confidence in the coming M. P. T. 0. 
A. convention at Boston. Possessing that con- 
fidence we cannot let too many weeks pass by 
without urging exhibitors to attend — and we say it in the 
belief that it rests entirely with those who do attend to 
decide what Boston will accomplish. There is an encour- 
aging lack of personal political bickering in the air these 
days, an encouraging undercurrent of thought that we 
will pass our convention season this year without damaging 
mud-slinging. Let's keep it that way. And — if you value 
exhibitor organization — go to Boston and do your share 
to keep it the kind of organization worth valuing. 

* * * 



Al Altman. One of the comparative- 
ly young "comers." Take our word 
for it. Write it down. A personality 
you can't help liking. A sincerity that 
is backed by real selling sense. Al sits 
in New York and watches the con- 
tracts — and brings 'em in — for Louis 
B. Mayer. Got his first sales expe- 
rience on the hard pan of book selling. 
Just now putting full steam behind 
"Why Men Leave Home." We heard 
John Kunsky, Harry Crandall and 
other showmen tell him at New Or- 
leans of the satisfaction it gave their 
box offices. That helps. 



Business Reading for Business Men 

FOR beauty of presentation and efficient strength of 
selling argument the industry has seen few examples 
to equal the booklet now being issued by Famous 
Players on the coming "Famous Forty." And back of the 
sheer excellence of the presentation there is evidence of 
a well-thought-out, carefully balanced program of enter- 
tainment. Here is real business literature. The exhibitor 
grown weary of press agent flub-dubbery will never tire 
of the opportunity to study the concrete, straight-forward, 
detailed presentation of PRODUCT — that on which his 
business fate rests. 




May 17, 1924 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



263 




INVESTORS 
SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT 

Of prime importance to 
every holder of securities 
is the constant supervision 
of his holdings. 

It is not good invest- 
ment practice merely to 
purchase sound securities. 

The cautious and intelli- 
gent investor keeps him- 
self thoroughly posted as 
to earning power, trade 
and general conditions af- 
fecting the bonds or stocks 
in which he is interested. 

Our Investors Service 
Department is prepared to 
aid in keeping you advised 
regarding these factors. 

Inquiries addressed to 
our offices at 1531 Broad- 
way, second floor, Astor 
Theatre Building, will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 



NEWBURGER, 
HENDERSON 
and LOEB 



Members 

New York and Philadelphia 
Stock Exchanges 

100 BROADWAY 



BRANCH OFFICES: 

202 Fifth Avenue 

at 25th Street 

1531 Broadway 

at 45th Street 

511 Fifth Avenue 

at 43rd Street 



PHILADELPHIA: 
1512 Walnut Street 



crista* in tfiG c^e-ec*/ 



Moving" Picture 

WORLD 

ROBERT E. WELSH EDITOR 

Published Weekly by 
CHALMERS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
516 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Member Audit Bureau Circulation 

John F. Chalmers, president; Alfred J. Chalmers, vice-presi- 
dent; James P. Chalmers, Sr., vice-president; Eliza J. Chalmers, 
secretary and treasurer, and Ervin L. Hall, business manager. 

Branch Offices: 28 East Jackson Boulevard, Chicago; W. E. 
Keefe, 1962 Cheromoya Avenue, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Editorial Staff: Ben H. Grimm, Associate Editor; John A. 
Archer, Managing Editor. 

Manager of Circulation : Dennis J. Shea. 

Subscription price : United States and its possessions, Mexico 
and Cuba, $3.00 a year; Canada, $3.50; foreign countries (post- 
paid), $10.00 a year. Copyright, 1924, Chalmers Publishing Co. 
Copyright throughout Great Britain and Colonies, under the 
provisions of the Copyright Act of 1911. (All rights reserved.) 

Other publications: Cine Mundial (Spanish). Technical books. 



VOLUME 68 



NUMBER 



Features 

Editorial 261 

Thumbnail Editorials — F. C. Munroe, Hiram Abrams, 

Jack Meador, Al Altman 262 

Bozo 264 

How One Man Beat Radio , 265 

News of the Week 

Daniel Loeb Speaks on Investment Securities 266 

Western Pennsylvania Exhibitors Hold Fourth Annual 

Convention 267 

M. P. T. O. A. Headquarters Assured of Large Western 

Attendance 269 

Universal Announces Twelve Big Fall Releases 271 

New York Governor Vetoes Murphy Bill 281 

Nebraska Exhibitors Would Tax Gasoline to Fix Roads 

for Picture Fans 303 

Departments 

Exhibitors News and Views 283 

Straight From the Shoulder Reports 290 

Selling the Picture to the Public 308 

Reviews 316 

Pep of the Program 320 

Schedule of Releases 322 

Equipment, Construction and Maintenance 325 

Projection 326 



One of a Series 

The Hamilton 
National Bank 

130 West 42nd Street 

Once upon a time — 

The towering pillars and im- 
posing marble front of a bank 
building reflected the attitude 
that a business man expected 
to find when he entered its 
portals. 

That time has passed. 

And today the business man 
who attempts to carry on 
without availing himself of the 
full cooperation of a helpful 
bank is disregarding a most 
valuable asset. 

Especially — 

When it is possible for you 
to find a bank that under- 
stands YOUR business, and 
looks upon it with sympathy. 

Hamilton National is YOUR 
bank. 

The cozy, cheerful atmos- 
phere of its conveniently lo- 
cated offices are only an index 
to the attitude you will en- 
counter — the sincere counsel, 
the whole-hearted coopera- 
tion. 

You wouldn't attempt to do 
business without satisfying 
yourself on every factor — pro- 
duction, laboratory, distribu- 
tion, etc. 

Then don't omit the bank. 

Get 100% there. 

It means fewer worried hours 
over financial problems, more 
consistent development and 
growth, greater utilization of 
your resources. 

A talk with one of our of- 
ficials will give you new light 
on this important factor in 
every business man's under- 
takings. 



Hamilton National Bank 



130 West 42nd Street 

(Bush Terminal Bldg.) 

New York City 

Open 9 A. If. tilt 10.30 /'. Mj 
Our Deposit Vaults — open at thr 
same hours — are admitted to ^ be 
the best equipped in the cits. 



264 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17, 1924 



Oscar the Operator Raps 

"Bozo" Jones 

Sellum Theatre, SRO, N. J. 

DEAR BOZO — Lend me your ears, Bozo, you aint 
gonna get away with that world's greatest him 
salesman stuff for another issue of the M. P. World. 
I got your No., Bo. I seen you around here off and on 
— mostly off — for the last fifteen years. You never sold 
nothing here but slides. You couldnt peddle an SRO sign 
in this Sinema house. 

"Take 'Em Off" 

I know you, Jonesy. The last time you was in here the 
Big Smoke told Tillie the Ticket Taker to hook you for 
admission if you ever come back. Sell? Huh, you couldnt 
sell the High Mogul a press sheet unless he was lit up. 
You couldnt come in this house and sell a news reel of the 
battle of Marathon. Bozo, you couldnt sell a trailer here 
for three bucks if you gave personal appearance with it 
of Sept. morning. 

The only thing you ever took out of this house was 
laughs. When you come around we know whats a matter 
with the movie business. When you lean up again the pay 
box and smile at the sales lady, I know they aint got all 
the comedians on the screen. Bozo, when you crash this 
burgh people wonder who Will Hays is that the picture 
folk art mindful of him. Laugh that one off. 

You ain't one reason why theys 20,000 movie theatres in 
the U. S. A. Your one reason why they aint more. 

Where did you jump from to the W. g. s.? How many 




Oscar the Operator — Himself in Penon 



"World's Greatest Film Salesman" 



years was you on the ticket chopper or grinding real in the 
old projection room ? 

Read on, Bozo. Maybe I can make a salesman outta you 
even if you haven't had training. Why take orders all 
your life? 

A good pair of legs don't make a salesman. Ed Weston 
never sold filum in his life. A real good salesman dont 
lower themselves to go round the country and swap risque 
yarns with exhibs. Long distance selling is my specialty. 
If I couldnt sell through printers ink I wouldnt call myself 
a salesman. Any bird can carry a suitcase around and sell. 
A bootlegger does that. Who ever invented order sheets 
anyway? My game is silent salesmanship. I sell them 
with advertising and when they dont order by wire the 
order is turned back marked nothing purcolating. 

"You Know Me" 

You seen me in the ads — Oscar the Operator, the Coupon 
Kid himself. I was on the job for Hodkinson a while. I 
wouldn't let the trade papers run me unless it was in paid 
space. Your fooling your time away Bozo on them editorial 
pages. 

I dictated the ads but never read them. Exhibs tied up 
the mails getting in orders. Some bird rote The Mailman 
to get sympathy for the Confederate soldiers in disguise. 
Those ads was so good that I used to go over to our ex- 
change and make bookings myself. The copy I rote had 
everything the advertising writing cor. schools said to put 
in — and more — arouse desire — create action — get the jack 
— read the proofs three times. The trade papers readers 
couldnt wait for this copy. Exhibs wired in for advance- 
proofs and they placed orders before the advertising came 
out. The printers got so interested in the copy they would 
dash out in the middle of the day to see the picture. Finally 
foreign printers who couldnt read English was used to set 
my copy. 
John Flinn Enters 

Then John Flinn came along. He inquired who was 
wagging the tongue that was bringing in more orders than 
a snake has hips. Paul Mooney said it had all the ear- 
marks of being Bozo Jones. 

Then the truth came, as Western Union messengers 
dashed back and forth with booking orders. That was the 
1st time Mr. Flinn heard of me — and that aint all — the last. 
He told Jo Berger, our genial P. a., to take my typewriter 
away sos they could get caught up on orders. 

Kept in "Jail" 

They kept me in the projection room from 9 to 6 and 
kept all writing material away. My finger nails was even 
filed sos I could not scratch copy on the walls. 

When they got caught up with orders I went back to 
Jersey. I claimed all worlds records for sales was broken 
and what more could a bird do? 

"Look Me Up" 

Look me up, Bozo. See the A. A. You. sales records for 
'twenty-three. Dont try to get it over on the public that 
YOU ARE THE W. G. S., and that your arguments is so 
good you believe them yourself. If you cant sell without 
leg work climb down of your high horse and hit it back 
to the great o. s. If you ever come in this house look me 
up and I will show you ads that will make you want to 
see the pictures you sell. What more could mortal sales- 
man do? 

Revengefully yours, 

OSCAR THE OPERATOR. 

From Hodkinson's House Organ, "The Dotted Line." 



May 17, 1924 MOVING PICTURE WORLD 265 

Theatre Broadcasting Station Increases Steady Attendance 



How One 
Man Beat 
Radio — 

When You Say "Radio" 
in Houston, Texas, You 
Mean The Iris Theatre— 

IS Radio Broadcasting Hurting the Movies? 
There is at least one theatre in the United States 
that has taken advantage of Radio and made the ether 
waves serve its own ends. That theatre is the Iris Theatre, 
at Houston, Texas. It owns and operates the radio station 
WEAY. Both station and theatre are owned by Will 
Horwitz, Jr. Both are successful beyond the average and 
one is part of the other, as Mr. Horwitz has proved. 

Because the experience of the Iris Theatre answers the 
question from the viewpoint of experience, and because it 
is one of the romances of business, it is well Avorth the 
telling. 

Mr. Horwitz, like all other successful theatre managers, 
is a believer in advertising. However, he goes beyond the 
average "live wire" in this respect. He sets his own pace 
— is guided entirely by his own conclusions. And he is 
quick to seize upon the things that are occupying the public 
attention and turning those things to his own advantage. 

A "Live Wire" 

This latter trait was directly responsible for the Iris 
Theatre broadcasting station. When radio took the coun - 
try by storm — small though it was in the beginning — Mr. 
Horwitz was busily engaged in exploiting the airplane in 
connection with his theatrical investments. He was main- 
taining a fleet of "ships" and fliers and was "pulling stunts," 
himself as pilot, when he could make the onlookers and 
the people generally talk about the Iris Theatre. 

Then came radio. He got aboard at once. On top of 
his theatre he built a radio shack and employed a semi- 
professional from the Pacific Coast to install a small broad- 
casting set for him. It was small as sets go nowadays, but 
it was a beginning that showed the way to larger things- 
including vastly larger box office receipts. 

Inexpensive Station First 

The initial Iris Theatre radio station was of the twenty- 
watt variety — sufficient in strength to be heard for possibly 
twenty or twenty-five miles. But it was a new thrill for 
the people of Texas. It gave them something to wonder 
at and to talk about — and, of course, to identify it, they had 
to talk about the Iris Theatre. 

Then they had to see it. That brought new patronage to 
the theatre. It did more, for it taught a great many thou- 
sands of persons something they did not know — the where- 
abouts of the Iris Theatre and the character of the pic- 
tures offered by it to the public. 

The small station was continued in operation and the box 
office continued to reflect increased patronage directly 
traceable to the broadcasting. That brought on more talk 



within the organization. If the small station was so good 
a thing — ■ if it succeeded in increasing the receipts so ma- 
terially, wouldn't a more powerful broadcasting plant do 
better? To make the plant more powerful was largely a 
matter of buying vacuum tubes of large capacity and sup- 
plying more electric current to them. This was done and 
the "set" was increased to 100-watts — capable of reaching 
a hundred miles from Houston. 

A careful check of the business was kept. It was soon 
discovered that two very healthy things had happened : 
First, the general attendance had increased perceptibly, 
and, Second, the peak and lean days were disappearing ; the 
attendance day by day was being evened and becoming 
much more substantial. 

The success of the "Hundred-Watter," as the radioists' 
call it, brought forth a complete remodeling of the plant. 
New and more powerful equipment was purchased and 
installed. The range of the broadcast was increased to 
250 watts, sufficient to reach several hundred miles, and 
then to 500 watts, with which the Iris Theatre has been 
heard to the four corners of the North American continent. 

Pictures Never Mentioned 

AlII the while the attendance at the Iris has been on the 
up-go. Broadcasting was begun more than two years ago. 
There has never been a day since when the theatre has not 
been on the air with an entertainment of some kind. Other 
stations came into the territory and the time on the air had 
to be divided, but the Iris is on the air three nights each 
week and four times each week-day, with never a mention 
of the picture being shown on the screen. 

Recently Mr. Horwitz went on the air himself. He told 
his listeners one morning at 11 o'clock that he was think- 
ing of buying a still more powerful broadcasting set. He 
asked them to write him and tell him frankly whether he 
should go ahead or whether he should get out of the air 
entirely and give them opportunity to listen to other and 
more distant stations. Again there was a marvelous re- 
sponse. In consequence a new Western Electric broadcast- 
ing station has been ordered and will be in operation on 
top of Mr. Horwitz's new theatre, the Texan, now in 
course of construction. 

No Additional Cost 

Thus is it proved that in this instance radio is NOT a 
competitor for the movies, but rather an ally, if properly 
used. The box office probably is the proof of the pudding. 
In^ the more than two years the Iris Theatre has been 
using a radio broadcast station as an advertising medium, 
the box office receipts have more than doubled; the lean 
days have been wiped out ; each day's attendance has been 
brought up to a general average — and all without one cent 
additional cost of advertising. 

The latter statement may sound queer, but it is a fact. 
When he had proved that radio was a good advertising 
medium — that it kept the people informed of the existence 
of the Iris Theatre and led them to patronize it — Mr. Hor- 
witz began the elimination of other advertising items, and 
turned the money thus saved to the maintenance of the 
radio department. Soon he had saved the cost of main- 
tenance in its entirety, so that his advertising, with almost 
twice the attendance, is no more costly than it was prior 
to the radio with half the attendance. 

The new Texan Theatre station will be one of the most 
powerful in the South. It will cost close to $25,000, includ- 
ing the new studio with its Carrier ventilating system, the 
new antenna towers and exterior equipment and the extra 
equipment necessary for broadcasting from places other 
than the theatre studio. And yet, Mr. Horwitz considers it 
one of the best investments he can make in putting the 
new theatre on a paying basis quickly. 



266 



MOVING PICTURE WORLD 



May 17, 1924 



Daniel Loeb Speaks on Security of 
Principal in Making Investments 



By DANIEL LOEB 

THE Moving Picture World has sta*ed 
to me that its readers would be glad 
to have before them one or more 
short discussions of securities. They suggest 
that rather than have specific securities 
submitted the men who are associated in 
the great industry of moving pictures would 
appreciate concise statements on securities 
in general. 

The business man who has surplus funds, 
either for temporary or permanent invest- 
ment, is confronted first by the question as 
to which class of securities he should select, 
and second, as to what issue in such class. 
His training, his energies and indeed his 
thoughts are largely centered in the prob- 
lems connected with the development of his 
own business. Such study as he may be 
able to make of the relative value of securi- 
ties is, after all, only casual. 

My first and most emphatic suggestion to 
men of the motion picture industry is that 
they should keep everlastingly before them 
the importance of safety of their principal. 
It is proper and natural to desire the largest 
return on an investment that is consistent 
with safety. Over a period of many years, 
however, I have observed that frequently 
this desire for safety is sacrificed to the 
greater return to be obtained from less well 
secured investments. 



It does not necessarily follow that a se- 
curity yielding 5 l /i per cent, is safer than 
another security yielding 6}A per cent. The 
point I wish to make, however, and to drive 
home to my readers, is that as between a 
Sy 2 per cent, return on a security of un- 
questioned merit, and a return of 6% per 
cent, on an investment that is even to some 
slight degree questionable, there should be 
no hesitation on the part of the investor in 
favor of the first named issue. 

It is the practice of many individuals and 
firms to lay aside in readily marketable se- 
curities such an annual amount as can con- 
veniently and safely be withdrawn from the 
conduct of a business. This policy has many 
advantages. It prevents over-expansion. 
The invested funds yield a worth while re- 
turn in interest. In the event of a need for 
capital, either for the regular business or 
for a new enterprise, the funds are immedi- 
ately available through sale of the securi- 
ties. If the new credit so desired is only 
for a very short period, the alternative ex- 
ists for bank accommodation, through the 
use of the securities as collateral. This sup- 
plies additional and frequently new avenues 
of banking accommodations. 

In my next article I shall discuss in more 
detail the various kinds of security invest- 
ments and the proper methods to be used 
in their selection. 




DANIEL LOEB 
General manager, Newburger, Henderson & 
Loeb. 

Start First in May 

News from the Metro studios in Holly- 
wood report that Robert G. Vignola has al- 
ready taken up his headquarters there and 
is busy with preliminary arrangements pre- 
paratory to starting work on his first special 
production for Metro. Mr. Vignola was ac- 
companied to the coast by Philip Carle, his 
assistant in all his big productions the last 
several years. Production on his first Metro 
picture will begin early in May. 



M. P. T. O. A. Delegation Again 
to Capitol; Oppose Music Tax 



A DELEGATION of motion picture 
theatre exhibitors, under the chair- 
manship of President Sydney Cohen 
of the M. P. T. O. A., returned to Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 6 to further the discussion 
with the House Committee on Patents on 
the Newton bill and the music tax. 

This was the field day for "Tin Pan Alley," 
which is the new slang phrase applied by 
Washington newspaper men to the members 
of the Authors, Composers and Publishers 
Association. About fifty song writers ap- 
peared before the committee to refute the 
claims made against the association by 
broadcasters, exhibitors, hotel managers and 
dancing school teachers. These latter have 
piled up a huge mass of evidence in support 
of the Newton bill to so amend the Patent 
Laws as to prevent this association from 
levying a fee for the use of copyrighted 
music which it controls. 

The music makers made a great plea to 
the committee to disregard the Newton bill. 
Their spokesmen told the congressmen how 
the money raised by this levy is distributed. 
Their president, Gene Buck